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  1. #1

    Default A65 BSA old show bike wiring question

    I have an old A65 show bike that runs no accessories, no headlight, no tail light. I'm looking for a simple wiring diagram for a capacitor with no battery, running factory points, factory Zener diode, and factory rectifier. I don't need any accessories at all, just enough to make the bike run. Any guidance would be appreciated.

  2. #2
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    Here you go. This one has a regulator rather than Zener but would be advised anyway.
    Gonna need to see a photo of the custom BSA

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    Click image for larger version. 

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    lol
    positive ground!!??
    lol
    what were they thinking?

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    REWIRING YOUR BRITBIKE (2-WIRE ALTERNATOR) - Positive Ground

    "... Possibly the main reason for slagging Joe Lucas, ("prince of darkness," etc.) is because of superstitions over Positive Ground systems. Joe had a point, believe it or not. It seems that using Positive for the "hot" side of a DC system results in terminal sulphation - that green stuff that grows on your battery terminals in your (non-Brit) car, for instance. Joe discovered that reversing the polarity eliminates the problem, and hence Positive Ground systems. The others, notably the Americans, didn't have this figured, and set up the convention of grounding the Negative instead, and thus the war began...

    This article applies to Positive Ground Systems only.

    Learning Experience 1: Build A Schematic
    You should have a schematic diagram, both to aid in your primary construction, and also for reference in the future. In addition, it's an easy way to do a "dry run" on the project, before you actually change anything. So, I recommend that you read this article over from start to finish, and construct a schematic diagram of your new wiring harness as you go.

    The word "schematic" means that basic symbols are used - rather than in the "pictorial" fashion, in which a close-to-photographic rendition is attempted. So, for example, a circle with an A in it can represent your ammeter, a rectangle with a (+) and a (-) your battery, etc. Furthermore, less attention need be paid to actual placement of the components' representations, although it's best to have the headlight at one end, the taillight at the other, etc.

    Start by making symbols on a blank sheet of paper for all your components. The ammeter, the head and tail lights, the ignition coil(s), the horn, (if applicable), the battery, the alternator and rectifier/regulator, and the switches. Once this is done, you may continue reading the article, joining the components with lines to represent the wires you will soon be connecting for real. Indicate chassis grounds with a short line terminating in small decreasing perpendicular lines. It will help to refer to a schematic in your manual for ideas for symbology. Mark the "conductors" (lines) with colour labels, or, better still, use coloured pen or pencil..."

    https://www.angelfire.com/biz/snwvlly/bikes/poswire.htm

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by TriNortchopz View Post
    REWIRING YOUR BRITBIKE (2-WIRE ALTERNATOR) - Positive Ground

    "... Possibly the main reason for slagging Joe Lucas, ("prince of darkness," etc.) is because of superstitions over Positive Ground systems. Joe had a point, believe it or not. It seems that using Positive for the "hot" side of a DC system results in terminal sulphation - that green stuff that grows on your battery terminals in your (non-Brit) car, for instance. Joe discovered that reversing the polarity eliminates the problem, and hence Positive Ground systems. The others, notably the Americans, didn't have this figured, and set up the convention of grounding the Negative instead, and thus the war began...

    This article applies to Positive Ground Systems only.

    Learning Experience 1: Build A Schematic
    You should have a schematic diagram, both to aid in your primary construction, and also for reference in the future. In addition, it's an easy way to do a "dry run" on the project, before you actually change anything. So, I recommend that you read this article over from start to finish, and construct a schematic diagram of your new wiring harness as you go.

    The word "schematic" means that basic symbols are used - rather than in the "pictorial" fashion, in which a close-to-photographic rendition is attempted. So, for example, a circle with an A in it can represent your ammeter, a rectangle with a (+) and a (-) your battery, etc. Furthermore, less attention need be paid to actual placement of the components' representations, although it's best to have the headlight at one end, the taillight at the other, etc.

    Start by making symbols on a blank sheet of paper for all your components. The ammeter, the head and tail lights, the ignition coil(s), the horn, (if applicable), the battery, the alternator and rectifier/regulator, and the switches. Once this is done, you may continue reading the article, joining the components with lines to represent the wires you will soon be connecting for real. Indicate chassis grounds with a short line terminating in small decreasing perpendicular lines. It will help to refer to a schematic in your manual for ideas for symbology. Mark the "conductors" (lines) with colour labels, or, better still, use coloured pen or pencil..."

    https://www.angelfire.com/biz/snwvlly/bikes/poswire.htm
    lol
    positive ground!!??
    what were they thinking!!??
    lol

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    Lots of old cars were positive ground, too, including Fords if my memory serves. As noted above, it is to cut down on corrosion of the battery terminals, mainly, and that is more important on 6 volt systems.

    Jim

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    Does this mean that reversing polarity would fix the problem of corrosion on the terminal of flashlights and all sorts of battery powered stuff?
    Pretty crazy if so.

    Suggest if you are going to run a bike with no battery you be sure to have clean, secure electrical connections. A good idea anytime of course. A battery can be thought of as low voltage insurance.
    Last edited by Nanonevol; 06-11-2022 at 6:08 PM.

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