CHOP CULT HOME
Email Password
Search
  1. #1
    Junior Member

    Content on this page requires a newer version of Adobe Flash Player.

    Get Adobe Flash player


    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    17

    Default May have destroyed my mags

    I have a set of sealed bearing 13 spoke mags I recently pulled the bearings on to have powder coated. When I dropped them off I asked them not to blast the inner bore of the wheel and to not coat the surfaces where the rotors meet the wheel. They did not coat the surfaces but did not block the innards of the wheel, roughing up the machined surface. Today I pressed in the new bearings. I used the VT102 bearing carrier in my floor press, doing it the correct way. There was no walking or anything. I pulled the bearing again to machine a new inner spacer noticing some aluminum had come off the ID from pressing in the bearing. Upon re installing the bearing it slipped in by hand, not easily, but by mistake. I do not want to machine the wheel for larger bearings for numerous reasons. Are there any products that would be suitable to hold these bearings in place? Sleeve retainer? I'm obviously not a happy camper as these wheels are increasingly difficult to find. Any advice welcome, I'm sure im not the only one to have this predicament.

  2. #2
    Senior Member

    Content on this page requires a newer version of Adobe Flash Player.

    Get Adobe Flash player


    Join Date
    May 2019
    Posts
    1,172

    Default

    I'm new to this, but I'd loctite it if it were mine.

    I sure wouldn't trash a wheel over a slip fit bearing.

  3. #3
    Senior Member

    Content on this page requires a newer version of Adobe Flash Player.

    Get Adobe Flash player


    Join Date
    Mar 2019
    Posts
    219

    Default

    https://www.amazon.com/Loctite-18352...s%2C318&sr=8-6

    680 is made to do exactly what you need. I wouldn't worry to much about it as long as it doesn't have slop in it.

    Jake

  4. #4
    Senior Member

    Content on this page requires a newer version of Adobe Flash Player.

    Get Adobe Flash player


    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    9,687

    Default

    For the outer bearing race there's no reason not to use sleeve retainer. Clean with acetone or similar non-petroleum solvent for best adhesion or use the sleeve retainer mfr recommended adhesion promoter (many people never read the approved procedures) and have at it.

    There are more magic goos than just what auto stores carry. It's worth checking mfrs websites (Hankel, etc) to find the ideal one for your application since they change often. If you ever need to remove the race you can tack weld some bar across it then use that to beat on with some round stock. The welding will thaw the sleeve retainer (which is a plastic).
    --

    I mask my own wheels because Bubba and LaQueefa don't care or know how.

    I use heavy allthread, nuts and large flat washers sealed to the wheel hub with RTV (peels off easily afterwards). I don't have to clean out the hub or even remove the bearings and spacers (which are convenient to leave in place vs. chasing them around the shop). This method survives sand blasting and powder coating without leakage. I use it on steering necks too. Leaving extra allthread is nice for hanging and handling. RTV is great for protecting threaded holes from blasting (peck out with forceps afterward). You can buy Kapton high temp masking tape online to mask other surfaces. If your allthread is the same OD as your axle (varies by motorcycle) or close it's handy as a bearing press. You can weld one end to a hunk of angle for easy securement in your bench vise. Allthread is versatile. Allthread is love.

  5. #5
    Junior Member

    Content on this page requires a newer version of Adobe Flash Player.

    Get Adobe Flash player


    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    17

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by farmall View Post
    For the outer bearing race there's no reason not to use sleeve retainer. Clean with acetone or similar non-petroleum solvent for best adhesion or use the sleeve retainer mfr recommended adhesion promoter (many people never read the approved procedures) and have at it.

    There are more magic goos than just what auto stores carry. It's worth checking mfrs websites (Hankel, etc) to find the ideal one for your application since they change often. If you ever need to remove the race you can tack weld some bar across it then use that to beat on with some round stock. The welding will thaw the sleeve retainer (which is a plastic).
    --

    I mask my own wheels because Bubba and LaQueefa don't care or know how.

    I use heavy allthread, nuts and large flat washers sealed to the wheel hub with RTV (peels off easily afterwards). I don't have to clean out the hub or even remove the bearings and spacers (which are convenient to leave in place vs. chasing them around the shop). This method survives sand blasting and powder coating without leakage. I use it on steering necks too. Leaving extra allthread is nice for hanging and handling. RTV is great for protecting threaded holes from blasting (peck out with forceps afterward). You can buy Kapton high temp masking tape online to mask other surfaces. If your allthread is the same OD as your axle (varies by motorcycle) or close it's handy as a bearing press. You can weld one end to a hunk of angle for easy securement in your bench vise. Allthread is versatile. Allthread is love.
    Sounds like you may have had a similar circumstance a time or two. Will do exactly that next time I have a critical part going to the sand blaster. I'm looking at loctite 641 currently as it is used if disassembly is required. 638 seems a bit much and 680 sounds permanent. These wheels are the sealed cartridge bearings not the timkens.

  6. #6
    Senior Member

    Content on this page requires a newer version of Adobe Flash Player.

    Get Adobe Flash player


    Join Date
    Mar 2019
    Posts
    167

    Default

    I was into rock climbers for a while. Occasionally a diff bearing would get shitty and wobble the race just enough to prevent a tight replacement fit.
    We would "dink' the race pocket with a pointy punch to make tiny craters that in turn would capture the new race. Not sure if the alloy of a rim would work as well as the cast iron of a differential.

  7. #7
    Senior Member

    Content on this page requires a newer version of Adobe Flash Player.

    Get Adobe Flash player


    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Posts
    1,231

    Default

    I doubt using the high strength loctite would be a problem on something you want a press fit with. If the bore is really trashed after this bearing set you could have them overbored with a MM outer diameter, inch ID. FWIW Practical machinist also recommends loctite or peening as methods.
    Last edited by seaking; 04-09-2021 at 6:34 AM.

  8. #8
    Senior Member

    Content on this page requires a newer version of Adobe Flash Player.

    Get Adobe Flash player


    Join Date
    May 2019
    Posts
    1,172

    Default

    IMO, it really depends on how bad it is.

    If we're just talking about a slip fit with no extra slop? I would just wipe some red loctite on it and run it for a week.. Then look at it again.

  9. #9

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Tater66 View Post
    I was into rock climbers for a while. Occasionally a diff bearing would get shitty and wobble the race just enough to prevent a tight replacement fit.
    We would "dink' the race pocket with a pointy punch to make tiny craters that in turn would capture the new race. Not sure if the alloy of a rim would work as well as the cast iron of a differential.

    this is what I've always done when a race or bearing is too loose.

Share This



Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Log in

Log in