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  1. #1
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    Default My 1963 BSA A10 Super Rocket

    David Bird tail piece, Bob Newby Racing belt drive primary, 39mm Sportster front end, Kustomtech hand controls, custom, oil tank, battery box, paint, etc.

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  2. #2

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    That's pretty tight.
    Great work.

  3. #3
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    very nice, love the LH pipes and belt drive.

    1963 BSA A10 SUPER ROCKET
    "The Super Rocket was launched in 1957 with the introduction of a new alloy cylinder head and the addition of an Amal TT carburetor. In 1961 a new "357" high-lift racing cam was added.
    1963 was the final year (a partial year) of A10 production as they ramped up production of the new unit-construction 650 A65, which started in late 1962, with over a year of overlapping production. With both bikes sitting side-by-side in the showroom, the old and the new, it must have been disheartening when BSA realized that the old bikes were selling better than the new ones.
    The 1963 BSA A10 Super Rocket was the last of the A10s, and represents the pinnacle of BSA's pre-unit bikes."

    https://www.classic-british-motorcyc...3-bsa-a10.html

  4. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by TriNortchopz View Post
    very nice, love the LH pipes and belt drive.

    1963 BSA A10 SUPER ROCKET
    "The Super Rocket was launched in 1957 with the introduction of a new alloy cylinder head and the addition of an Amal TT carburetor. In 1961 a new "357" high-lift racing cam was added.
    1963 was the final year (a partial year) of A10 production as they ramped up production of the new unit-construction 650 A65, which started in late 1962, with over a year of overlapping production. With both bikes sitting side-by-side in the showroom, the old and the new, it must have been disheartening when BSA realized that the old bikes were selling better than the new ones.
    The 1963 BSA A10 Super Rocket was the last of the A10s, and represents the pinnacle of BSA's pre-unit bikes."

    https://www.classic-british-motorcyc...3-bsa-a10.html
    Having had both, I’d say the A10 was better all round than the A65. Kawasaki based their Commander on the A7 and it was a great bike, too

  5. #5
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    Smoking!

  6. #6

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    Very nice.
    On the right side behind gearbox, appears to be an arm/pivot mounted in frame, what is that?

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by johno View Post
    Very nice.
    On the right side behind gearbox, appears to be an arm/pivot mounted in frame, what is that?
    My guess is the old swingarm mounts were used for the rear brake light switch, super neat!��

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by johno View Post
    Very nice.
    On the right side behind gearbox, appears to be an arm/pivot mounted in frame, what is that?
    On certain late preunit A10s, and continuing to 1965 on SOME unit A65s they ran a cross shaft for a brake on the opposite side. This bike is not running those wheels, but some BSAs used a big moon shaped drum wheel with the brake on the right side, the wheels front and rear are matching and I have a A10 and a A65 that run them. The same wheel was shared with some of the Ariel models.

    The chain sprocket is a 4 bolt and plain looking, but distinctive. Most of the "Sports" models ran the tradition drum/sprocket rear wheel, So it was the grey porridge such as the Golden flash or Star twins.

    You can see it in the blue bike here,, https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/F...te_BSA_A10.jpg

    Or better photos showing both sides on this site. (The Blue 'un)
    See: https://british-classic-motorcycles....x.php/bsa-a10/

    On the chopper-bobber above, not clear they didnt use the swing arm boss, Id have to research it on my own frames, But the point is, SOME BSA's ran a cross over shaft for a different style of wheel and brake.
    But here it appears he is using it to actuate the brake light switch,

    The bike here looks good, but in the pictures the rear brake lever is sitting awful low, looks like you might stub your toe when cornering and using the brake, maybe its just the photo, but the way it looks it seems cornering is limited.

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dougtheinternetannoyance123 View Post
    On certain late preunit A10s, and continuing to 1965 on SOME unit A65s they ran a cross shaft for a brake on the opposite side. This bike is not running those wheels, but some BSAs used a big moon shaped drum wheel with the brake on the right side, the wheels front and rear are matching and I have a A10 and a A65 that run them. The same wheel was shared with some of the Ariel models.

    The chain sprocket is a 4 bolt and plain looking, but distinctive. Most of the "Sports" models ran the tradition drum/sprocket rear wheel, So it was the grey porridge such as the Golden flash or Star twins.

    You can see it in the blue bike here,, https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/F...te_BSA_A10.jpg

    Or better photos showing both sides on this site. (The Blue 'un)
    See: https://british-classic-motorcycles....x.php/bsa-a10/

    On the chopper-bobber above, not clear they didnt use the swing arm boss, Id have to research it on my own frames, But the point is, SOME BSA's ran a cross over shaft for a different style of wheel and brake.
    But here it appears he is using it to actuate the brake light switch,

    The bike here looks good, but in the pictures the rear brake lever is sitting awful low, looks like you might stub your toe when cornering and using the brake, maybe its just the photo, but the way it looks it seems cornering is limited.
    Thanks. I thought it might be some sort of cross over, but with the different wheels on the bike, it didn't make any sense. Now it does.

  10. #10

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    Very nice I like the style.

  11. #11
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    Since the original QD hub actuates on the right side of the bike and the conical hub I had actuates on the left, had to use a pull rod from the newer bike to run the drum. Luckily the rod fit into the brake lever. However, didn't want to run the brake light switch on the rod, just didn't like that look so got the original A10 brake set up with the crossover rod which has the lever for the drum on the right side of the bike. Fitted a universal switch to the front of the battery box and used the original crossover arm operate the switch.

    Front half of bike is original frame, rear brake pedal sits right up under the original front foot peg like it should...might look low because of angle?

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by inflaymes View Post
    Since the original QD hub actuates on the right side of the bike and the conical hub I had actuates on the left, had to use a pull rod from the newer bike to run the drum. Luckily the rod fit into the brake lever. However, didn't want to run the brake light switch on the rod, just didn't like that look so got the original A10 brake set up with the crossover rod which has the lever for the drum on the right side of the bike. Fitted a universal switch to the front of the battery box and used the original crossover arm operate the switch.

    Front half of bike is original frame, rear brake pedal sits right up under the original front foot peg like it should...might look low because of angle?
    Good to hear the details, seems I guessed right, The picture DOES make it look like the bike is really low and looks like cornering hard leaned over it would scrape or rub, But I guess just the pictures.
    (Was not critisizing, just an observation)

    That Bob Newby belt set up is sweet. I heard they stopped making them? I hope not, as I hear good things about them.

  13. #13
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    I'm not sure if they quit making them? Can still buy them at lowbrow customs.


    Quote Originally Posted by Dougtheinternetannoyance123 View Post

    That Bob Newby belt set up is sweet. I heard they stopped making them? I hope not, as I hear good things about them.

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