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  1. #1

    Default Help! New to me 1400 Intruder. Jacked the threads on upper fork tube.

    Hey guys. Hoping for some advice here as I'm just hitting a wall thinking of a fix. So, I recently got back into the motorcycle world after a 15 year break and bought a 96 intruder that was needing to be saved from it's neglectful PO. Not overly pretty with all the pitting on the chrome, sagging signal lights, etc, but I was able to see some serious potential in this old girl. I have some grand plans including stretching the backbone and more but for now I'd really like to just enjoy getting to know her before the Pacific Northwest rain season makes its return appearance. After a few rides it became clear that the fork oil situation needed addressed because the front end dive was far too excessive. I set about doing a fluid change and seal replacement, and all was going smooth until I went to reassemble the top end of the left fork tube. It seems that when putting that goofy plug/bolt/spring retainer dude in I cross threaded it. By the time I realised it it was too late. I ended up buying a bent fork from a bonyard to aquire another of the bolt/plug whatever it is since the only other option I found was to wait forever and pay through the nose for shipping from Japan. Well, I went about reassembly round two today. The new plug bolt won't thread into the tube. Upon closer inspection, the threads in the tube are slightly buggered. I tried searching out a tap but apparently no one makes a 37x1.5, even the tap and die sizing charts don't list such a thing. I got creative and used the extra cap I now have and cut in 4 slices on the threads to make a sort of shade tree thread chaser, and although it did seem to do a little judging by the shavings after I ran it in and out a few times, that dam plug bolt still doesn't seem to want to run in. I'm trying to be careful not to damage this one since getting another has proved to be a pain in the arse. Anybody have any suggestions on what to do here?

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by BackInTheSaddle View Post
    Anybody have any suggestions on what to do here?
    Yea post some pics of what your working with......... And do some paragraph breaks it's hard to read without them..........

  3. #3

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    If it was me I would slather up the slotted cap with coarse valve lapping compound and rum it in and out quite a few times. Clean really good and see if the new one starts to thread in. If it does start in slather it in coarse lapping compound and work it in and out Make sure you clean the threads really good.

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    could use a thread file to clean up the internal threads

    Click image for larger version. 

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    and, if you haven't already, shape your cut in the thread cap to have a sharp face at 90 degrees to the thread centerline, so there is a sharp face 'cutting' the threads...think like how a tap cuts the thread with a sharp face.

  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tattooo View Post
    Yea post some pics of what your working with......... And do some paragraph breaks it's hard to read without them..........
    You've surely got a point. I just re-read myself and rambling to say the least. I'll try and clean up my post and get pics tomorrow morning before I head off to work.

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by flatman View Post
    If it was me I would slather up the slotted cap with coarse valve lapping compound and rum it in and out quite a few times. Clean really good and see if the new one starts to thread in. If it does start in slather it in coarse lapping compound and work it in and out Make sure you clean the threads really good.
    I hadn't thought about lapping compound. That just might work. I'll give it a try. Thanks.

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by TriNortchopz View Post
    could use a thread file to clean up the internal threads

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	thread-file.jpg 
Views:	24 
Size:	9.8 KB 
ID:	105891

    and, if you haven't already, shape your cut in the thread cap to have a sharp face at 90 degrees to the thread centerline, so there is a sharp face 'cutting' the threads...think like how a tap cuts the thread with a sharp face.
    I've got a thread file and have ran it on the externals on the cap and the bolt. Not sure exactly how to use one do clean up the internal threads of the tube though.

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    I was a bit quick on that one...the pic shows just the external thread file;

    The files without the nipple are for external thread repair only. The cut nipple added on the end allows the one tool to repair both the internal and external thread.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    http://www.warrensvillefile.com/inde...ring-file.html

    another option is this style:

    Internal Thread Restorers
    Click image for larger version. 

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ID:	105905
    Model TF-50M: includes the toolholder and 3 sets of cutting blades for restoring internal metric thread pitches of 1.25, 1.5, and 1.75.
    https://www.victornet.com/subdepartm...pair/1420.html

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    I just looked at the parts image for your bike; I see what you mean when you say "goofy plug/bolt/spring retainer dude"...the spring stopper below the cap nut...is it steel or aluminum?

    BOLT, FORK INNER
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	a215d7f87cc507b5848e9956bb95ded6--oem-parts-forks.jpg 
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    https://www.partzilla.com/catalog/su...glp/front-fork
    Last edited by TriNortchopz; 08-24-2020 at 7:24 AM. Reason: image has diff ref #

  10. #10

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    [QUOTE=TriNortchopz;851652]I just looked at the parts image for your bike; I see what you mean when you say "goofy plug/bolt/spring retainer dude"...the spring stopper below the cap nut...is it steel or aluminum?

    Aluminum. I'm guessing that was to prevent stripping the forks in the tube itself as that is steel.

  11. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by flatman View Post
    If it was me I would slather up the slotted cap with coarse valve lapping compound and rum it in and out quite a few times. Clean really good and see if the new one starts to thread in. If it does start in slather it in coarse lapping compound and work it in and out Make sure you clean the threads really good.
    Thank you kindly for this tip flatman. Finally had a day off and a chance to work on the bike today. Did just as you instructed and low and behold threads on all now look brand new again. I will surely be adding this to the bag o tricks.

    Thanks again

  12. #12

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by TriNortchopz View Post
    I was a bit quick on that one...the pic shows just the external thread file;

    The files without the nipple are for external thread repair only. The cut nipple added on the end allows the one tool to repair both the internal and external thread.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	thread_restoring.jpg 
Views:	0 
Size:	37.9 KB 
ID:	105904
    http://www.warrensvillefile.com/inde...ring-file.html

    another option is this style:

    Internal Thread Restorers
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	500.jpg 
Views:	20 
Size:	19.6 KB 
ID:	105905
    Model TF-50M: includes the toolholder and 3 sets of cutting blades for restoring internal metric thread pitches of 1.25, 1.5, and 1.75.
    https://www.victornet.com/subdepartm...pair/1420.html
    I do intend to purchase on those restorer tools. I actually had never seen such a thing, but after looking at it there was about a million occasions that popped to mind that one of those would've saved the day.

  13. #13

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    glad it worked out for you

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