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Thread: Rear Brake Help

  1. #1

    Default Rear Brake Help

    1992 Sportster 1200. Installed a banjo brake light switch and wanted to grab some suggestions for a problem i'm having. I'd imagine it's supposed to operate like a car's brake light and when you start pressing the brake lever the light comes on. The issue i'm having is that it only comes on when the brake level is almost completely pressed. How would i get the brake light to come on when the level is initially pressed? Only thing i could think to do would be to keep bleeding the brake? I'd appreciate any help from you guys.

  2. #2
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    Sounds like u got the right idea, brake definitely needs to be completely bled. It's the pressurized fluid that activates the switch.

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    Yep keep pumping.....

  4. #4

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    Saw in a similar post that since my brake caliper bleed nipple is facing the ground on the bottom of the caliper i may need to unbolt the caliper and put a spacer in it and bleed it facing up? Any truth to this?

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    Quote Originally Posted by DRare View Post
    Any truth to this?
    Yep that's very true....... Air rises to the top not the bottom......

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    They're all correct.
    Realize it is a "pressure" switch, so until you feel the pressure resistance pulling the lever, no signal connection will be present to complete the circuit.
    My 2cents...

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    I see there are other styles of non-banjo brake light switches that are low pressure switches...this was automotive based:

    "...The standard brake pressure switch activates the brake lights around 60 pounds of pressure. With my truck that is typically when I'm already stopped. Very scary. The older, higher pressure switches should be banned.
    This Painless 80174 switch however activates at 25 pounds of pressure. Basically the lightest touch of the brakes activates the brake lights. That's exactly how it should be..."

    and,

    Ron Francis Wiring Low-Pressure Hydraulic Brake Switches SW32
    "Get high-quality, low-pressure brake light switches from Ron Francis Wiring. These hydraulic brake light switches offer longer life, silicone fluid compatibility, and they're DOT-compliant. Ron Francis low-pressure switches fit most cars and require only 20-50 lbs. of pressure to come on--much less than stock units need! Make your brake lights quicker and avoid being bumped with low-pressure hydraulic brake light switches from Ron Francis Wiring."
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	rfw-sw32_ml.jpg 
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    https://www.summitracing.com/parts/rfw-sw32


    got me curious, so I sent Goodridge an email asking about low pressure banjo bolt brake light switches.

    https://www.goodridge.co.uk/products...e6c1bf85&_ss=r
    Last edited by TriNortchopz; 05-25-2020 at 8:32 PM.

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    You can bleed a brake system at any joint, not just the nipple, and that's frequently necessary on motorcycles.

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    Goodridge does not mention pressure...maybe give them a call - I see a couple of US phone numbers:

    https://us.goodridge.com/app/goodrid...Guide_2018.pdf

  10. #10

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    thanks for the info guys. I appreciate it. i'm going to attempt to hold the caliper right side up and continue to bleed it tomorrow. Will tune back in.

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    Quote Originally Posted by DRare View Post
    thanks for the info guys. I appreciate it. i'm going to attempt to hold the caliper right side up and continue to bleed it tomorrow. Will tune back in.
    If it were me, I would put something between the pads to eliminate the possibility of popping the piston(s) out.

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    Good thing you mentioned that!

  13. #13

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    So i finally got the brake lever to stiffen up. took more bleeding than i care to admit. Wondering if anyone who's running one of these switches can answer this. Now my lever is decently stiff and the light only comes on about where the lever gets stiff about an inch into pressing the lever. Not sure if this is normal just wanted to check. Ideally i'd like it to come on when i start pressing the pedal at all.
    Last edited by DRare; 05-30-2020 at 8:11 AM.

  14. #14
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    the lever is held back by a spring,
    you first move the lever against the spring THEN it engages the piston & you start to push fluid,
    between the piston and the lever there is an adjuster nut on the push rod,
    slacken it and wind it out untill the rod is starting to contact/push the piston,
    then wind it back off a couple of turns for some slack & make SURE that you are not running with the rod pushing on the piston,
    that way when bled properly you have a small almost of sprung travel before it starts pushing the piston.
    the light will come on IF IT IS BLED PROPERLY,..almost as soon as you press the lever..
    you MUST have a small amount of slack or the brakes can lock up on you,
    (or wear out the pads or disc's early),....
    if you are not sure about this, get someone who does know to walk you through it,
    it sounds like you have a lot of sprung travel before you start pushing fluid,
    simply bleeding the calliper is not the same as setting the pedal although it is a part of it
    setting the pedal up
    Last edited by tzienlee; 05-30-2020 at 10:31 AM.

  15. #15

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    dude you're an absolute life saver. I completely forgot i disconnected that rod when i tore the bike down and when i reinstalled it i meant to adjust it and lo and behold i forgot that too. +1 for you tzienlee. thanks man.

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    No worries fella, glad to help, Just remember, not EVERYTHING simple is a woman !!!......hahaahhaahahahaa

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