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  1. #1

    Default Need tips for ironhead transmission removal

    Can someone give me tips on how to remove a ironhead(82) transmission access cover I already lost a good screwdriver trying to pry it open.i took the four bolts off just can't seem to find any wiggle room to pry the side off Click image for larger version. 

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  2. #2
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    Ya could take the chain and sprocket off the mainshaft and get ya a chuck of hard wood and give the shaft a good smack with a hammer ..
    (But ya didn't hear that from me, I use that tool in the photo)
    Last edited by Dragstews; 03-10-2020 at 8:33 PM.

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    Goose, What did the manual say how to remove it???????????

    Just wondering???????

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    I'm not all that sure, but I think the Manual recommends using that tool ... ??

    Pulling the door off those two huge dowel pins can be a booger .. !!
    Their tight as bark on a tree ...

    Even with the tool in use, sometimes a heat gun on the door is needed...
    Last edited by Dragstews; 03-10-2020 at 9:36 PM.

  5. #5

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    It's not much help Click image for larger version. 

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  6. #6

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    I got a small torch can that do it as well ?
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails image.jpg  

  7. #7

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    To take off the sprocket nut I need a torque wrench correct ? And then I can proceed with the job

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    This may be helpful as you proceed:

    THREAD; 1982 Ironhead Transmission Removal (W/ Pics):

    http://xlforum.net/forums/showthread.php?t=2023217

    this may supplement your manual:
    1971 - 1985 Sportster Four-Speed Constant Mesh Wet Clutch Transmission & Specifications
    http://sportsterpedia.com/doku.php/t...h:transfinal03

    and this may help with clutch adjustment after reassembly:

    "Unfortunately, the procedure in the manual proved as useful as all of the guides I found by stumbling around Google. Tinkering around, I came up with my own procedure, modestly named:

    Curtis’ Mega-Awesome Ironhead Clutch Adjustment Technique Extraordinare

    http://odenmotorshop.com/2014/05/dre...ead-nightmare/
    Last edited by TriNortchopz; 03-10-2020 at 10:19 PM. Reason: pedia site

  10. #10

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    I usually loosen the sprocket nut till it's about flush with the end of the shaft and use a fairly heavy plastic dead blow hammer on the end. Leaving the nut on protects the threads and prevents everything flying out the other end.
    You can help it out by heating the trap door around the two dowel pins with just a propane torch.
    If it comes off one but not the other you need to tread lightly. Place the butt of another hammer against the trap door next to the one that came loose to make the force go to the other dowel area.
    People sometimes put rtv on the trap door mistakenly and that can really make it a bitch.

  11. #11

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    Thanks for the share

  12. #12

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    Going to read this after work and get back to it

  13. #13

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    Okay definitely will give this a go to see if I can do that or just order the special tool

  14. #14
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    This may be a reference for you as you build/rebuild your Ironheads:

    How to Build a Sportster
    (from a pile of junk) 7 chapters

    in Chapter 5; a short example of the type of info:

    "And now a training point on tranny trap doors (see the picture). The one on the right is for right side shifts, the one on the left is for left side shifts.
    They are basically the same, except that the one for left side shift has a cut out for the shift lever to pass through on its way out the primary cover.
    You can use the left side shift trap door on a right side shift bike with no changes, It looks to me that you can use the right side shift trap door on a left side shift bike, if you machine out the cut out for the shift lever.
    And a similar training point on the pawl carrier and shifter pawl. Notice the shifter pawl on the right, it is for a right side shift bike. You can tell because the shaft for the shifter cam extends past the top surface of the pawl carrier.
    The pawl carrier on the left is for the left side shift bike, you can tell because the shaft for the shifter cam is flush with the pawl carrier surface. This is so that it will clear the shifter shaft as it crosses back across to the left side of the bike on its way through the primary cover.
    I do believe you can use a left side shift pawl carrier on a right side shift bike.
    You cannot use a right side shift pawl carrier on a left side shift bike because the shifter cam shaft will hit the shifter shaft as it crosses back across to the left side of the bike on its way through the primary cover.

    A final note on the trap doors, when you press the clutch hub bearing in, put the outer snap ring in and press the bearing from the inside of the door to the outside and let it bottom against the snap ring. Why? Because there is some clearance between the bearing and the snap rings. If the bearing is pressed against the inner snap ring and it looses up and moves towards the outer snap ring it will screw up the end play on your main shaft. Which might make for hard shifts or popping out of gear. I've seen it happen.
    With the bearing pressed against the outer snap ring you can never get too much end play because the bearing is already moved as far as it can go...
    The +.020 shifter fork fixed the first/second gear engagement problem. So bolting the tranny in was a no brainer? Wrong. The tranny, which basically shifted OK on the bench didn't shift worth a damn when bolted into the crank case. How could this be? Well, I'll tell you. The end of the shifter shaft was hitting the pawl carrier and binding up. I stuck the shifter shaft on my lathe and made it a few thou shorter. Mind you this was a brand new shifter shaft.
    The moral of the story is that you can never assume that any two given parts will fit together properly. Everything must be checked and double checked. Everything. I bet I had this tranny bolted in 15 times before I was satisfied that it was good to go..."

    https://www.ironheadcycle.com/pages/howto5.html

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