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  1. #1
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    Default Tools to get started

    What are some starter tools to get started to jump right in I know a basic socket kit what else

  2. #2
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    And is it ok to go cheap

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    Quote Originally Posted by biker85 View Post
    And is it ok to go cheap
    NO unless you don't plan on working on things very long..... I've got tools that I bought 45 years ago... Take care of your tools and you will have them until the day you die............

    Cheap tools are just that, CHEAP I don't know about you but my knuckles are worth more than a few high dollar meals......
    Last edited by Tattooo; 10-23-2017 at 4:44 PM.

  4. #4

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    Bench grinder with wire wheel on one side. drill press (could be bench model) Angle grinder 2 cents

  5. #5
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    I just figured I start out with cheap tools in order to just jump in and start tinkering and things like that I understand where you are coming from and agree with you a 100% but I have to start somewhere because I am way behind that's why I just have a small socket set that I use for working on my car plus I'm not ready yet figure I pick some brains

  6. #6
    rokytnji
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    Good large c-clamp for removing valves in heads. You figure out what size you need since no bike is mentioned.
    Leather Pants Belt for locking up primary chain for removal of Clutch Basket and Compensating sprocket. For locking up gears. Whatever.
    Propane bottle with tip for heating stuff.
    Solder with flux in it.
    A bottle of uppers to keep you going . Coffee pot and coffee a good substitute if no uppers.
    A beer fridge for break time when done.
    A FSM of some sort.
    Rags.
    Brain optional. Having seen some FU strange fixes in my time.

    Like a 2x4 with a sledge hammer to pound out a welded piston. Then ball honed all night. Only used a quart of oil every 150 miles. Add a quart at every fill up.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by rokytnji View Post
    Good large c-clamp for removing valves in heads.
    Not sure if you're serious or not but that's a good way to damage your heads. A valve spring compressor is designed the way it is to only apply pressure to the valve and springs, not the surrounding areas. A c-clamp can slip off under pressure and gouge your compression chamber, grenade valve keepers and is just a pain in the ass to try and get to the point where you can even compress the springs.

    How do I know all of this? Because I've done it and got smoked by the valve keepers shooting off at Mach 3.

    For basic tools I'd start with some simple wrenches, both in metric and standard, socket set and GOOD socket wrench, screw drivers of all shapes and sizes, some basic electrical tools, allen key socket set and a nice torque wrench. That should get you through damn near everything you need to do.

  8. #8
    rokytnji
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    How do I know all of this? Because I've done it and got smoked by the valve keepers shooting off at Mach 3.
    My Bad. Assuming folks were skilled as me using tools. Never mind.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by rokytnji View Post
    My Bad. Assuming folks were skilled as me using tools. Never mind.
    It's ok it took me a few years on forums to figure that out too..... Most are new to this stuff.........

  10. #10
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    get nice hand tools. screwdrivers, sockets, pliers. get a good drill. some harbor freight stuff is just fine. i have one of their lifts. it works good enough. i have a electric impact driver i got there that's been really good. angle grinders aren't bad. check out pawn shops/ebay for power tools.

    watch every video this guy has.


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    My personal baseline is craftsman. If it's been good enough for two generations of my family, it's good enough for me. Then step up to used snap on, Matco type stuff if you're wearing stuff out. Don't ever buy a cheap fuckin hammer, and don't ever buy a cheap fuckin anything you'd ever hit a hammer with. Don't substitute flat blade screwdrivers for chisels, none of that shit. Get the right tool for the job and you'll always be happy. For power tools, buy a cheap Grinder if you must, but for the love of GOD KEEP THE GUARD ON IT until you are familliar with what cutoff wheels break apart and what ones don't. (Ask the 6 inch scar in my stomach how I know, or the thumb that'll never be straight again.) if you're hitting it with a hammer, or it's spinning real real fast, or you could get your body parts caught in it and severely injure yourself spend a few bucks. If it's a wrench, Rachet, or pair of channel locks feel free to go Moderately cheap.... just remember you get what you pay for..... and your body can heal, but the hospital bill is more expensive than the tool ever would have been..

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    buy things as you need them. tools you will only use 1 time are better if you can borrow it. but I do have shit used once DOH!
    i'm just saying if you buy half the shit people are going to recommend you'll end up with that much needed mule and some other well intentioned bits you might never use.

  13. #13

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    Forgot, basic, VICE, hacksaw big hammer

  14. #14
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    Since we're in the American bike thread I'm gonna assume you will need:
    SAE wrench set
    SAE socket set w/ratchet (3/8" would be best)
    quality screwdriver set
    SAE allen wrenches
    quality adj. wrench
    pliers(reg.& needlenose)
    rubber mallet

    Like JFuller said, if you get into power tools it's "Safety First" and wear your eye protection too.

  15. #15
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    Get your ass out and buy a new tool, even if it's just a cheap one every pay period, and hit up pawn shops. The nastier the shop the better--and know your prices a little bit, some charge more than HF for new unopened HF tools. You can find USA most of the time over cheap foreign crap this way for less, and it'll last far longer than new. Ace still sells craftsman tools, their screwdrivers are still USA made but those assholes have been slowly packing up and selling out to Taiwan. Wolverine tool sources most of their items, you might be able to find their stuff online.
    Hit up lots of garage sales, ask around at places, I've bought a sportster, some nice williams and craftsman tools, and a nice kennedy box all from the lady at the bakery.
    Get an impact driver, the HF 1/2" and a small cordless 20v impact have done me wonders and are great for pulling a primary apart.
    If you need to pull a motor apart or put it back together hose clamps make great piston ring compressors.
    Sometimes it helps to shadow someone that knows a little about this stuff but watch a bunch of those tatro machine videos to know what you'll need.

    Armstrong Tools 20-972 1/2" Drive Black Oxide Teardrop Ratchet Polished Handle Part# CT-20-972

    ^^^I like that 1/2" ratchet and would consider getting an American drive/socket set over anything chinese. There are still a few tool shops that sell American Williams sockets and honestly their prices are comparable. Just a year or two ago Craftsman started sourcing their sockets from overseas, that really bothered me because you cannot wear the USA sets out.
    I'd say buy American at a minimum for 1/2 and 3/8s drive sets, you'll use those every time you get your tools out.

  16. #16
    rokytnji
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    Quote Originally Posted by seaking View Post
    Get your ass out and buy a new tool, even if it's just a cheap one every pay period, and hit up pawn shops. The nastier the shop the better--and know your prices a little bit, some charge more than HF for new unopened HF tools. You can find USA most of the time over cheap foreign crap this way for less, and it'll last far longer than new. Ace still sells craftsman tools, their screwdrivers are still USA made but those assholes have been slowly packing up and selling out to Taiwan. Wolverine tool sources most of their items, you might be able to find their stuff online.
    Hit up lots of garage sales, ask around at places, I've bought a sportster, some nice williams and craftsman tools, and a nice kennedy box all from the lady at the bakery.
    Get an impact driver, the HF 1/2" and a small cordless 20v impact have done me wonders and are great for pulling a primary apart.
    If you need to pull a motor apart or put it back together hose clamps make great piston ring compressors.
    Sometimes it helps to shadow someone that knows a little about this stuff but watch a bunch of those tatro machine videos to know what you'll need.

    Armstrong Tools 20-972 1/2" Drive Black Oxide Teardrop Ratchet Polished Handle Part# CT-20-972

    ^^^I like that 1/2" ratchet and would consider getting an American drive/socket set over anything chinese. There are still a few tool shops that sell American Williams sockets and honestly their prices are comparable. Just a year or two ago Craftsman started sourcing their sockets from overseas, that really bothered me because you cannot wear the USA sets out.
    I'd say buy American at a minimum for 1/2 and 3/8s drive sets, you'll use those every time you get your tools out.
    I like how you roll also. If this shit was easy. Everybody would be doing it.



    Ediot: I make my polishing compound. Why buy that? Look up on line. I am now gun shy recommending stuff. Don't want to recommend anyone screwing up their bike. Huh?
    Last edited by rokytnji; 10-24-2017 at 6:31 AM.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jfuller View Post
    My personal baseline is craftsman.
    Those are GREAT tools.... That's some of what I've have for 45 years..... Some are worn the fuck out but they are still great tools...

  18. #18
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    Craftsman are good, especially wrenches and sockets. Their ratchets and screwdrivers are not that great. I would recommend skipping craftsman screwdrivers and going for Mac, Matco or a used Snap-on set, as they tend to grab screws much better, and have better grips. If you can find a Craftsman hundreds of pieces mechanic set on sale, that is a really good, affordable start. Gear wrenches are handy too, and if you look out you can get them cheap on sale. I have quite an assortment of brands, but avoid the super cheap shit unless it's a one use or I'm in a pinch (i.e.. big ass socket from auto zone).
    Buy what you need as you need it or when you find it on sale.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by rokytnji View Post
    My Bad. Assuming folks were skilled as me using tools. Never mind.
    Not everybody is going to be jesus with a torque wrench bud. That's why they make valve spring compressors, so we don't have to use tools not designed for the task. You can build a house with a hammer, but its a lot easier with a nail gun.

  20. #20
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    What about lathe ewheel phammer and other fabrication tools thank you all for you're time and advice how long has everyone been working on motorcycles

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