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  1. #1
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    Default torquing head bolts on Pans

    So everyone's got their favorite way, but I want to hear YOUR genius way that has to be 100x easier and more accurate then the way I do it. So what have you found is the easiest and most accurate way to torque head bolts (and cylinder base bolts while we're at it), especially thinking about the inside bolts that are hard to get to? Thanks!

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    Quote Originally Posted by mikewerx View Post
    So everyone's got their favorite way, but I want to hear YOUR genius way that has to be 100x easier and more accurate then the way I do it. So what have you found is the easiest and most accurate way to torque head bolts (and cylinder base bolts while we're at it), especially thinking about the inside bolts that are hard to get to? Thanks!
    I have rebuilt at least 3-4 pans in the last 10 years, and I feel your pain. There really is no accurate way to get the torque readings for those damn tight confines area head bolts, so.......

    Whether right or wrong, I used plain jane "S" closed end wrench, tightened each slightly in a criss cross star pattern, until they were all fairly tight. Then I tapped each on the end of the wrench a few times with hammer after that. Not slamming with a hammer, but a few taps

    Yep, not accurate within fact torque specs by any means, but I have never run into any issues doing it that way

    Recheck for tightness after about a 100 miles.

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    When the guy was rebuilding my shovel, he used a box wrench on the head bolts.....I asked him "what's the torque on the head bolts?" He laughed and said "good and tight"

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    Could use .......

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    Factory specks 55 to 75 ft-lbs on the headbolts, 32 to 40 on the jug base nuts...
    (Or Non-factory specks, Two Grunts and a Fart) ...
    On occasion might soil your nickers on the headbolts....



    If so... You over torqued .. !!! ....

    Note:
    It's a good idea to use Anti-Seize on the headbolts and Blue (222) Loctite on the base nuts....
    Last edited by Dragstews; 05-25-2016 at 1:07 PM.

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    Another thing that helps is know your own strength..... If your strong use a shorter wrench that's what I do... If your weak get a longer wrench.... Have an idea how hard your pulling the wrench don't jerk it or put your foot on it.... Common since goes a long way when your torquing something.... Take your time.....

    Hell if your torquing something and it's 35lbs and it starts getting easy at 25lbs stop your fixing to strip it out.....

    I seen a guy take a impact screwdriver to a cam cover... The kind you hit with a hammer......WHY I asked??? He said he didn't want it to leak even though he was breaking the lips on the cover..... I just tighten them with a screw driver with my hands and I have never had one leak of break..... I don't torque them at all.....

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    I use the same setup as Drag, may have to shave one side on a beltsander on some torque adapters, I need to buy a new torque wrench, honestly you can tell when there tight after a while but a hammer no fakkin way................

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tattooo View Post
    Another thing that helps is know your own strength..... If your strong use a shorter wrench that's what I do... If your weak get a longer wrench.... Have an idea how hard your pulling the wrench don't jerk it or put your foot on it.... Common since goes a long way when your torquing something.... Take your time.....

    Hell if your torquing something and it's 35lbs and it starts getting easy at 25lbs stop your fixing to strip it out.....

    I seen a guy take a impact screwdriver to a cam cover... The kind you hit with a hammer......WHY I asked??? He said he didn't want it to leak even though he was breaking the lips on the cover..... I just tighten them with a screw driver with my hands and I have never had one leak of break..... I don't torque them at all.....
    ya using blue with those right....
    i do that allso but some times on a bike you know I take pliers and hold scewdriver and turn alittle after hand tight not much , just that seat feeling never had a problem

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dragstews View Post
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    Those torque adapters will make your life easier. They're perfect for getting into all of the hard to reach areas.

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    Hand impact drivers are for screw REMOVAL and idiot using them to tighten cover screws was a fucking mong.

    You could, if you really want to, make a torque adapter out of the usual C-shaped "starter wrench" or the other "usual" 3/8" extension with a 90-degree bend at the end (try not to overheat your socket retention ball spring when using a torch to make the bend) by welding a socket on the same plane as the fastener you are tightening.

    You don't have to figure adapter torque tables if the torque wrench is 90-degrees out from the adapter. It neither leads nor lags, just pull slowly.

    I just do Pan and Shovel heads by feel. No blown gaskets yet. Using a torque wrench often also teaches feel.

    See List of Illustrations for torque adapter examples. There's some useful info here: http://www.robins.af.mil/shared/medi...091006-042.pdf
    Last edited by farmall; 05-26-2016 at 1:37 PM.

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    Thanks for all your good words guys. I got myself some curvy wrenches, and we'll give that a shot. The torque adapters seem like a huge math problem, but I could give that a go if the prior doesn't work. Thanks for the diagram Farmall.. Cheers all

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    Quote Originally Posted by mikewerx View Post
    Thanks for all your good words guys. I got myself some curvy wrenches, and we'll give that a shot. The torque adapters seem like a huge math problem, but I could give that a go if the prior doesn't work. Thanks for the diagram Farmall.. Cheers all
    As farmall stated, so long as you keep the adapter at 90 degrees you don't need to use the formula to adjust your torque value (the values aren't a big deal, there are online calculators you can use).

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    Don't get confused by adapter shape either, since the position of the fastener relative to torque wrench head is all that matters.

    If you have an inline ratchet it makes positioning the torque wrench easier.

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