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  1. #21
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    coming along nice. I dig swing arm frames. my 64 was one of the most comfortable rides I've owned. good call on getting rid of the rear disk and going with the stock pieces. good luck. your welds look fine. grind and sand grind and sand

  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by dlandberg View Post
    great fabrication on those pipes! Always love bulding exhaust pipes and its cool to se other do to!
    Thanks! It is pretty fun I think... getting the flow just right.

    But... I did hit a snag. Someone pointed out to me that it may be hard to reach my clutch pedal with the pipe as high as it is. It's pretty tight up against the head, but its still adding quite a bit to the overall width at that elevation.

    I hopped on the moto this evening, made vroom-vroom noises and realized that to get to the high pipe is right in the way. Poop. I *really* don't want to scoot the foot controls out at all, and with the removal of the compensator sprocket up on the left and the fwd mounted brake master on the right I am planning on shifting the floorboards at least an inch in from stock. For some reason I really irks my eye to see a killer, narrow chop with pegs that dangle an extra inch or so out (generally because of the peg length PLUS the clevis, hinge, and mount). I'm not going for the classic lanesplitter style here, but still want to weed out all the "Big Dog Chopper" stench where I can.

    So, I'm working on lowering it while still maintaining the overall vibe I want. Gotta do it right or just might as well buy some Paughco's or something... Its a shame because I did like the "scrambler" high pipe vibe the higher pipes were emitting. But the major theme of "left side shotguns" will come through nonetheless.

    Chop chop chop
    Last edited by ericthebeard; 01-20-2016 at 1:18 AM.

  3. #23
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    Also got a round swingarm from a local guy off another board, unfortunately the fine-thread 3/8x24 axle adjuster pots were a little buggared up.

    Found a random 3/8 NF tap to chase the threads, carefully mucked with it for about half an hour trying to get it started in the threads before realizing it was a left-hand tap. WTF. At least I didn't "persuade" it any more than I did.

    Got myself a proper thread chaser and with a lot of lube and washing out got it re-established. In hind sight it would have been really good to grab a rifle bore brush to clean out the cut gunk. May still do that if they continue to feel gritty...

    IMG_3095 by Eric Bott, on Flickr

    IMG_3096 by Eric Bott, on Flickr

    IMG_3097 by Eric Bott, on Flickr

  4. #24
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    Obigitory "vroom vroom" shot, tinkering with foot positioning. Now thinking about ditching the floorboards for pegs off the rear floorboard tabs.

    Then hacking up the Pangea Speed clutch pedal and integrating that with the left mount...

    IMG_3098 by Eric Bott, on Flickr

  5. #25
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    Subscribed! Love all the pics, and I'm in about the same spot with my 56.


    And I will buy all the floorboards and mounting bits if you don't want them.

  6. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by RokDoctor View Post
    Subscribed! Love all the pics, and I'm in about the same spot with my 56.


    And I will buy all the floorboards and mounting bits if you don't want them.
    Rock on man, thanks for the kind words glad you dig it.

    I'm still waffling on the board but leaning toward ditching them and likely will end up doing just that... PM sent.

  7. #27
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    Some progress, exciting parts arrivals, more teardown and attempted arson!

    First off, got the round swingarm in hand and the existing tapered bearings were sad looking... at least that's what I was assuming they looked like under that 7 lbs of grease.

    IMG_3133 by Eric Bott, on Flickr

    The other side was missing the seal flange thing and the bearing cage was spun in the housing. That was easy (ish) to beat out.

    IMG_3134 by Eric Bott, on Flickr

    Then zero progress, lots of pounding with a drift with little effect (and little desire to get tooooo crazy on it). The inner lip of the outter race, still left stubbornly in the housing) is protected by a seat in the housing... so getting a purchase on it for pummeling was slow going. Until someone on here suggested welding a nub on the race to pound against. Damn near lit the whole thing on fire. Turns out grease is flammable.

    SUCCESS.

    IMG_3141 by Eric Bott, on Flickr

    IMG_3140 by Eric Bott, on Flickr

    New bearings are on the way, and I'm going to try to clean this guy up as much as I can (for mockup purposes at least) until then.

    Also got the stock clutch basket pulled off the mainshaft, and the front pulley. Ready to replace with the belt primary.... once I can find a shop to press out the Primo clutch hub out of this old setup and into the new basket.

    IMG_3131 by Eric Bott, on Flickr

    IMG_3132 by Eric Bott, on Flickr

    I also need to just sit and stare at this for a while while I imagine up foot control solutions. I want to keep things open but am too much of a pussy to run with at fully open belt... not for gross bodily harm issues just dont want my pants and shit chewed up in it. Or my foot, that applies too.

    So, the left side puzzle is minimal but good looking belt guard (mostly guarding the upper, rear portion of the front belt... the hungry bit) with the foot peg location with a clutch pedal. All looking sezzy of course.

    And with the tins out of the way I can get at the speedo gear, replacing it with a plug form Baker.

    IMG_3137 by Eric Bott, on Flickr

    Small victories.

  8. #28
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    I think the Japanese kickass builder friend Mr. Daikoube has the right idea for my setup... taking inspiration from his PERFECTLY well executed Knuckle (NOT my pics).











    I like the integration of the foot mount, mounting location, and integrating that with a good looking pulley guard.

    Plus its never a bad time to ogle that bike again.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails tumblr_o1oxupy4cS1t3fonbo6_1280.jpg  

  9. #29
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    New bits! Got a new front wheel/brake combo.

    Its a '68 Bonneville TLS 19" round thing. Very excited how this looks all mocked up.

    IMG_3165 by Eric Bott, on Flickr

    IMG_3166 by Eric Bott, on Flickr

    IMG_3167 by Eric Bott, on Flickr

    The 8" drum is a big boy. Classy stopping.

    IMG_3150 by Eric Bott, on Flickr

    IMG_3151 by Eric Bott, on Flickr

    She should clean up nice...

    IMG_3154 by Eric Bott, on Flickr

  10. #30
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    Now for the question and answer period: Getting the Triumph wheel to the Harley wide glide.

    What I know thus far:
    -Triumph is designed for a 20mm axle.
    -Harley axle is 3/4" (~19mm).
    -Bearings in the Triumph hub are Timken/Fafnir 204k, 20mm bore x 47mm OD x 14mm wide.
    -The backing plate is also sleeved to ride on a 20mm axle.

    My plan was to make a combo axle sleeve/inner spacer like this after putting in new bearings (the 6204-2RS are the sealed 20mm bore replacements for the 204k's) like this (from DBBP.com):



    And then typical 3/4" spacers outside the hub for centering the wheel and side load transfer.

    BUT. That would leave around 0.5mm of meat left on the sleeve between the stock axle and the inner race. Seems not only small but a pain to machine.

    OR the other option is to make a copy of the Harley wide-glide axle with a 20mm center section instead of 3/4". Then in assembly I'll have a set three of 20mm ID spacers to go between the fork leg and bearing, between the bearings, and between the opposite bearing and opposite leg. Same philosophy as before.

    So... which option does ya'll suggest?

    Pics of junk:

    Triumph axle:
    IMG_3159 by Eric Bott, on Flickr

    Triumph left side bearing on the axle:
    IMG_3161 by Eric Bott, on Flickr

    Trans Atlantic axle standoff:
    IMG_3163 by Eric Bott, on Flickr

    IMG_3164 by Eric Bott, on Flickr

    Figurin' the bearing OD:
    IMG_3158 by Eric Bott, on Flickr

    Right side bearing in the hub, the backing plate rides on this inner race:
    IMG_3157 by Eric Bott, on Flickr

  11. #31
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    To some rear swingarm work...

    You may recall that the bike came with a square shovel style swingarm. That wont do. So I got more or less to the end of the swingarm conversion part of the sage (minus re-painting).

    The "new" more-period-correcter swingarm had.... shall we say... "crusty" bearings. Needed replacement.

    IMG_3133 by Eric Bott, on Flickr

    Getting them out was learning experience. Basically lots of pounding (and cleaning overloads of excess grease) yielded this:

    IMG_3140 by Eric Bott, on Flickr

    And that inner race was STUBBORN. Finally got it out by welding a lil goober on it for traction with the drift. Then more hammering.

    IMG_3141 by Eric Bott, on Flickr

    New race going in, with the perfectly sized impact socket to even application of violence.

    IMG_3192 by Eric Bott, on Flickr

    Checking even seating:

    IMG_3193 by Eric Bott, on Flickr

    New tapered roller thingies:

    IMG_3196 by Eric Bott, on Flickr

    Basic assembly:

    IMG_3197 by Eric Bott, on Flickr

    Turns out the stud on the right had pretty jacked up threads. Also turns out that buying a new set of (cheapo) studs is basically the same as getting the 5/8"x18 die with a large die holder. So... re cut the threads, keep the OEM studs and save my bike from another overseas part. Feels good.

    LARO8402 by Eric Bott, on Flickr

    Install swingarm (getting drag roughly set, everything's going to come apart later for refinishing then get all locktite'd and torqued).

    IMG_3199 by Eric Bott, on Flickr

    Still have the 12" shocks... not sure if I am going to keep them for the lower ride or find some 13.5"-ers.

    IMG_3202 by Eric Bott, on Flickr

  12. #32
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    Whats that saying? Knowing just enough to be dangerous?

    IMG_3360 by Eric Bott, on Flickr

    IMG_3368 by Eric Bott, on Flickr

    IMG_3370 by Eric Bott, on Flickr

    More detail later...

    Yes. Teaser

  13. #33
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    Click image for larger version. 

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ID:	67890yer breakin my balls over here!!!!!!!!!!!

    Click image for larger version. 

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    leon

  14. #34
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    Alright, back at it. The most movement and progress has been in the tanks department. I was fairly set about a wassell style tank for the bike, but then the newly released Lowbrow narrowed splits came out. That messed up my plans, in a good way I guess. I've been waffling back and forth between the two for a while... I am about 50/50 between them style wise, but the price difference is pretty significant ($160 vs $400). That got me thinking.. I've been trying to sell the perfectly good shovelhead 5 gal fat bobs that came on the bike to no avail, so how hard is it really to just axe the pair myself?

    So, like any modern material girl, I turned to the internet and asked (warning, the "other" forum link below):
    http://www.jockeyjournal.com/forum/s...58#post1831458

    Then with just enough info and confidence to be dangerous I dove in.

    Lining out the split lines:
    IMG_3360 by Eric Bott, on Flickr

    IMG_3361 by Eric Bott, on Flickr

    IMG_3362 by Eric Bott, on Flickr

    IMG_3363 by Eric Bott, on Flickr

    Then got to cutting (after a bath of hot water and dish soap on the insides to keep my eyebrows and fingers happy).
    IMG_3363 by Eric Bott, on Flickr

    IMG_3365 by Eric Bott, on Flickr

    One down!

    IMG_3367 by Eric Bott, on Flickr

    Now I gotta make the other look the same. It would have been good to mask both off first then cut, but I was too excited.

    IMG_3368 by Eric Bott, on Flickr

    IMG_3370 by Eric Bott, on Flickr

  15. #35
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    Didn't really know what it would take to get the existing tank lining material out of there and was starting to get ready for a big sandblasting bill... but the wire wheel made pretty decent work out of it.

    IMG_3375 by Eric Bott, on Flickr

    May still get them blasted before final assembly, but this took the lion's share away.

    Checking for overall symmetry and flatness.

    IMG_3376 by Eric Bott, on Flickr

    Trimming away lil bits o fat:

    IMG_3378 by Eric Bott, on Flickr

    Mating them up. The plan it to get the top ridge of the two halves lines up then temporarily tack them together. Then fix them to the table to make a new universal flat bottom and "tunnel" notch... Hard to explain, pics will show it when I get there.

    IMG_3379 by Eric Bott, on Flickr

    Checking estimated overall width of the new skinny (minus the eventual gap between them).
    IMG_3381 by Eric Bott, on Flickr

    Rough shape for the "tunnel" notch. I want the two halves to be ~1/4" to 1/2" apart at the top, then flair to a 2" width to make it around the neck castings and top tube and whatnot...

    IMG_3385 by Eric Bott, on Flickr

    Matching up the top seams:

    IMG_3386 by Eric Bott, on Flickr

    IMG_3387 by Eric Bott, on Flickr

    Eyeballing twist in the halves. This is really not too important now because I am going to replace the factory bottom.

    IMG_3388 by Eric Bott, on Flickr

  16. #36
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    Ahhh that looks familiar. Just did the same thing on my build. Its so much more fun doing it yourself ,rather than just buying one. Looking good

  17. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by slinginrods View Post
    Ahhh that looks familiar. Just did the same thing on my build. Its so much more fun doing it yourself ,rather than just buying one. Looking good
    Thanks, thats exactly what I'm going for. Even if its a little fucked up looking and not perfect, I'd rather have my work showing that I can call my own rather than buying it (to a point at least )

  18. #38
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    More work done.

    I realize I am jumping around a lot with bits and bobs on the bike without actually finishing anything fully yet. Part of that is ADD, but the more adult-like reason is that I do want to get a "proof of concept" for each of the parts I have imagined in my mind before I invest lots of time finishing out any one in particular. Make sure all the little pieces and details actually fit together and function right as they're built. So I'm making all the parts in parallel, a little at a time, all at once.

    So, today little bite out of the problem was starting on my mids setup. Again, there is a reasonably complex (to me at least, not to many I'm sure) setup I am imagining for the foot controls involving foot pegs and front pulley cover al la Daikoue (the awesome Japanese builder).

    First off, pulley cover. Take one compensating sprocket outter primary tin:
    IMG_3308 by Eric Bott, on Flickr

    A little laser surgery:
    IMG_3310 by Eric Bott, on Flickr

    IMG_3311 by Eric Bott, on Flickr

    IMG_3312 by Eric Bott, on Flickr

    IMG_3313 by Eric Bott, on Flickr

    And some aw-sheet metal patching:
    IMG_3334 by Eric Bott, on Flickr

    IMG_3335 by Eric Bott, on Flickr

    Now. This is my very first foray into sheet metal work... LOTS of welding and grinding and welding and shaping and fucking about. You can see lots of voids and junk in the "final" product that'll be bondo'd. If nothing else it taught me lots.

    Here's the general idea for its placement and use:
    IMG_3340 by Eric Bott, on Flickr

    IMG_3342 by Eric Bott, on Flickr

  19. #39
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    The next part was/is the piece to tie this into the frame and give a good support mount for the footpeg.

    Some jib-jabs for Lowbrow and 1" stock:
    IMG_3490 by Eric Bott, on Flickr

    IMG_3492 by Eric Bott, on Flickr

    A little "damn I wish I had a milling machine"
    IMG_3493 by Eric Bott, on Flickr

    IMG_3496 by Eric Bott, on Flickr

    Then to something I've been hemming and hawing over... brazing. Basically, from my "research" it's generally held that brazing is a cancer on modern "choppers". But, on the negative side, 1) I don't have a TIG, 2) I'll likely not get one soon as the cash I'd spend on that I'd rather put elsewhere (like a mill?) 3) I'm fine paying a pro to do the more complex metal gluing like aluminum work and TIGing up the gas tank halves.

    On the pro side, 1) I know how to braze and think I'm pretty decent enough at it and can make pretty fillets, I learned from bicycle frame builders, 2) I have a good setup for it, not a MAP torch and flux-cored turd maker 3) I enjoy it (which makes me want to get a TIG setup).

    Anyhow, fuck it I'm going to braze these bits and probably others.

    Slather it in brazers snot after a good cleaning:
    IMG_3497 by Eric Bott, on Flickr

    The drill bit is there to show me the bung orientation as I'm working, keeping it aligned.

    Some preheat and flux sizzle:
    IMG_3498 by Eric Bott, on Flickr

    Aaaaand BRAZING IT ALL ITS GLORY:
    IMG_3502 by Eric Bott, on Flickr

    No touchy yet.

    Now touchy:
    IMG_3503 by Eric Bott, on Flickr

    And touchy lots. I did a lot of cleanup mostly to see what works best and practice shaping things. After wire wheeling off the leftover flux post bath:
    IMG_3504 by Eric Bott, on Flickr

    IMG_3505 by Eric Bott, on Flickr

    Hand file work:
    IMG_3507 by Eric Bott, on Flickr

    IMG_3509 by Eric Bott, on Flickr

    It's not to final shape yet but I'm just playing around, slowly approaching the method I want to use for the rest of the bits.

    General fitment. Still needs to be bent vertical around the pulley.
    IMG_3520 by Eric Bott, on Flickr

    And how it'll work with the pulley cover. Basically tucking in behind it and running high enough for the foot peg to attach to in the middle of the cover.

    IMG_3523 by Eric Bott, on Flickr

    I realize I devoted a LONG post to just this little part. Can't really tell (through my excitement and passionate moto fab lust) if that's a good thing or bad thing.

  20. #40
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    Brazing done right can take abuse. I used to braze "steel rule dies" for fabric cutting. Think of a cookie cutter in a large mechanical press. They cut multiple layers of synthetic fabric and that shit ain't delicate.

    SInce you like brazing consider practicing gas welding since you already own all the equipment.

    https://www.tinmantech.com/gallery-of-metalwork/ has some inspirational welding and fab porn.

    You want this book. The newer versions tend to have less quality content. It's an unsurpassed classic from when gas was the main welding process. BTW many of the torches you see are still in production or were until recently. I rebuild and collect torches and have much love for Oxweld/Purox/Linde gear. The advert isn't mine but this printing is a good one:

    http://www.ebay.com/itm/1937-THE-OXW...YAAOSwq7dXFV4R

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