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  1. #1
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    Default '69 ironhead tranny problem

    I am still on the hunt for my project chop. I found what i think is a decent deal . Just need some info before i dive in. Guy says it needs a mainshaft bearing and race. Also said there is no damage to the case. How big of a project is this? (only slightly mechanically inclined). He is asking $1600. What do you guys think?


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    anyone?

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    The way I see it,
    A titled pre 71 ironhead engine should fetch easily $1k even needing work.
    That front end should bring you another $500 at least.

    That being said it seems like a good deal (with a title), but then again its your money.

    Just consider how much work you can do on your own and how much will require you to pay someone else( mechanic, machine work, etc). Because you can find a road ready early sporty for $3-4k all day long.

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    I think thats a good start to quite a bike. $1600 is a good price if the bike runs. Ironheads had alot of transmission problems so theres parts available, and alot of information.

    However, if you don't want to wrench, dont buy an ironhead. Take your dough and pick up an evo.

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    At 1600 your not getting screwed. Tell him you looked into getting the tranny parts and they're at least $200. So offer $1400

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    Quote Originally Posted by RetroRob View Post
    At 1600 your not getting screwed. Tell him you looked into getting the tranny parts and they're at least $200. So offer $1400

    Exactly how I would go about it. Like stated though, even at 16 it's probably not bad. If you've never owned an old harley just be ready for any kind of surprises though. Good luck!

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    Quote Originally Posted by RetroRob View Post
    At 1600 your not getting screwed. Tell him you looked into getting the tranny parts and they're at least $200. So offer $1400
    To keep from giving you an entire page rant, I'd offer him $900 and tread carefully. This could either be a minor issue or could grow exponentially until you're putting big twin money into an ironhead. My reasoning (and I'd tell him this) is that since it has a transmission problem, you need leeway to cover parts and other potential problems you encounter when you pull the motor apart. IF you end up in a worst case scenario, you can still part it out or sell it whole and break even.

    I'm not a mechanic either but I'd check all mounts, busted case bolts, busted primary/cam cover bolts, busted fins, case welds, leaks, cracks, does it have the original case seal? Check plugs, primary oil (glitter), check compression, and check oil level.
    Does it hold charge? How's the wiring look? How's the battery? Keep in mind, minor stuff adds up. Buy a factory manual, don't even look at the Haynes. It's not worth a shit.

    I'd assume full top end rebuild (guides/seals), brake pads, wheel bearings, and even if the tread is good, the tires are likely too old and lost their grip. Be careful with any case bolts, hit them with penetrant first.

    Really the only reason I'd consider this project is because it's stock from the front back. I suggest you go the stock route with this bike, that's where the resale value is w/ ironheads and you're all ready pretty damn close. I know this is chop cult but I'd pull the rake and find a stock front end, then flip it. good luck. Lemme know if you pass.

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    Not a big job. Pull the primary cover, remove clutch basket. Undo trap door bolts, withdraw transmission (after removing sprocket). Inspect mainshaft (could be screwed up from the bearing going out). Knock out race. Install new race. Grease race and install needle bearings. Be very careful putting transmission in so you don't knock loose any needle bearings. Check endplay, if ok button it up.

  9. #9

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    I usually slap my tranny when she gives me problems! Lol

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    Due to my experience with an Ironhead I am always gun shy, even running ironheads can be a whole host of problems. I bought on and had nothing but bad shit. Previous owners ten to fuck them up cause they're a cheap way to get into riding Harleys, I would prefer to buy one apart in boxes as opposed to a complete one so at least I could look at the parts, take some measurements and know what I'm getting myself into.

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