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  1. #1
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    Default What's the deal on deep HOLE SAWS

    Hey guys,

    Wondering if anyone knows a company that makes deep hole saws.

    I mill on a Bridgeport with a 1 7/8 inch hole saw with a diameter of 1 inch

    I need a deeper hole saw because my cuts fill the whole interior of my current saw.

    I've been digging and havn't found anything.

    Can anybody hook me up with a good line on some deep saws?

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    Click image for larger version. 

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    Not sure if this is any better, but since you are running a bridge port you could run a rotabroach bit.


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    How deep do you want to go?

    http://pipemanproducts.com/products....p-BM-Hole-Saws

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    try tricktools.com

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    I love Rotabroaches but they aren't center-cutting like drills or milling cutters, which limits their depth of cut.

    Keep an eye on Ebay for things like large center cut end mills. My machinist bud saves mad cash buying most of his mills and a bunch of other tooling off Ebay. If you want a vendor, Enco are reasonable and have been around a long time. MSC costs more but are the go-to company for rapid shipping.

    1" isn't a large diameter hole so no particular reason you couldn't drill it or mill it depending on your stock. I'd rather use a mill since if you are making parts for a weldment and need to wallow/oval the hole a bit the mill is ideal vs a drill, and a holesaw won't do that at all. Mills can approach at off-angles better than holesaws or drills.

    You can get reduced shank end mills to fit your Bridgeport collets.

    http://www.use-enco.com/CGI/INSRHI?PMSECT=0000000702

    1" taper shank drill bits are a good way to go if drilling holes in plate (you didn't specify your use). They are a cheap way to get a deep hole. If entering the stock at an off angle you can center-drill first to ensure the larger drill tip doesn't "walk". I like to use a center drill for almost every drilled hole, be it with a mill, drill press, or hand drill.

    Here's an example MSC search. If you don't have a PC with an internet connection in your shop, get their free book. It's a very informative read.

    http://www.mscdirect.com/browse/?nav...+1%22+end+mill
    Last edited by farmall; 11-09-2013 at 5:32 PM.

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    Farmall,

    Thanks for the thorough reply. This was very helpful. I think the endmill is the best option for me.

    My application is handlebar and frame construction.

    Mark

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    Quote Originally Posted by farmall View Post
    I love Rotabroaches but they aren't center-cutting like drills or milling cutters, which limits their depth of cut.

    Keep an eye on Ebay for things like large center cut end mills. My machinist bud saves mad cash buying most of his mills and a bunch of other tooling off Ebay. If you want a vendor, Enco are reasonable and have been around a long time. MSC costs more but are the go-to company for rapid shipping.

    1" isn't a large diameter hole so no particular reason you couldn't drill it or mill it depending on your stock. I'd rather use a mill since if you are making parts for a weldment and need to wallow/oval the hole a bit the mill is ideal vs a drill, and a holesaw won't do that at all. Mills can approach at off-angles better than holesaws or drills.

    You can get reduced shank end mills to fit your Bridgeport collets.

    http://www.use-enco.com/CGI/INSRHI?PMSECT=0000000702

    1" taper shank drill bits are a good way to go if drilling holes in plate (you didn't specify your use). They are a cheap way to get a deep hole. If entering the stock at an off angle you can center-drill first to ensure the larger drill tip doesn't "walk". I like to use a center drill for almost every drilled hole, be it with a mill, drill press, or hand drill.

    Here's an example MSC search. If you don't have a PC with an internet connection in your shop, get their free book. It's a very informative read.

    http://www.mscdirect.com/browse/?nav...+1%22+end+mill
    Killer advise man, thanks for the helpful reply.


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    My application is handlebar and frame construction.
    Many tubing notchers use milling cutters. Check out the Practical Machinist forums for beaucoup machining info. Kickass place to lurk, as are the WeldingWeb forums.
    Last edited by farmall; 11-11-2013 at 4:54 PM.

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