CHOP CULT HOME
GALLERY   FEATURES   FORUM   EVENTS   CLASSIFIEDS   BLOGDUMP   COMMUNITY   MEMBERS   STORE  


























New Header for March

Featuring Josh's totally rad Neighborhood Ironhead. I do believe there might be a full feature on this baby coming soon to issue #119 possibly? I think every part on the bike came from within a 25 mile radius of his house or something crazy like that. He told me the whole story while we were on the ferry for the Revenge Run, but the details are a bit hazy at this point... The full-on proper feature should be a real doozie! Happy March (7 days late) and welcome home spring!

Comment with Facebook


 
 

Comment with Chopcult (0)

Please Login to Comment





Recent Blogs

April Fuels is cancelled



From our friends at April Fuels - 'We are cancelling the ride on these dates. We planned this ride for folks to have a good time, not to ride two days in the solid rain and huddle under a tarp.  We are very sorry to anyone this negatively effects. We would wait longer but we want to gove people a chance. Please keep following www.instagram.com/aprilfuels as we will repost a new date." -Cooker

New Feature: The VNM



Richard Minino and Yardley came together many years ago to form The VNM. The VNM is a one-stop shop for designs, artwork, and paint. Richard and Yardley both have major roles in the company, but both agree one the #1 Goal: Have a Good Time! I'm sure if you open your closet you can find a few designs created by them, for brands like Biltwell, Chemical Candy Customs, Southbound and Down, and so much more. ChopCult currently has three designs in stock that Yardley created, and I'm sure you will see more down the road. The thing I love most about these guys is that they are super easy to work with and have a fast turnaround. So let's open a cold one and get to know the guys behind The VNM. Enjoy!

New EXFIL-80 Bag from Biltwell Inc.


Built to hold all your gear, this robust moto-ruck will easily swallow everything you need to travel and camp from your motorcycle for days on end. Adding functionality, the large external tool compartment is padded on the outside so you can lean back on it. This section easily unzips to put your tools and smaller items right at your fingertips without unstrapping the bag from your bike. The EXFIL-80 UV-treated and water resistant, but when you need 100% waterproofing, just open the zipper just under the tool compartment and pull out the attached waterproof sleeve and slide it over the entire system.



Construction:

- Roll-top closure with velcro and side release buckles

- PVC backed for increased water resistance

- UV-Treated 1680 ballistic polyester

- Hi-vis orange interior liner

- Three removable, 1.5 inch mounting straps with reflective stitching

- Velcro-mounted, removable tool pouch



- Tool Compartment holds: 9 deep sockets, seven combination wrenches, includes mesh pocket and flat document pocket

- Waterproof sleeve in zippered compartment at base of bag

- Four rows of MOLLE webbing for modular customization

- SBS zippers

- Shoulder strap included

- Holds up to 80 - 12oz cans

Overall Dimensions (when full and closed):14' wide x 12' deep x 20' tall



Available in Black and OD Green.
Retails for $199.95

Watch the Main Forum and our Instagram account as we'll be giving one of these away soon, thanks to Biltwell's kind donation. Sign up here and take advantage of our FREE membership.

Save

Cole Rogers - 138 Cycle Fabrication

While walking through the motorcycle section of the Piston Power Show two years ago, I stumbled upon this insane looking Sportster. My eyes were locked onto it from across the walk way and I couldn't stop myself from walking towards it if I tried. The front end was like nothing I had ever seen before and the stance was so low. Right beside it was another one with a similar style but an Ironhead. With all the normalcy that show gives, there where these two diamonds hiding in the rough. As I finally fought my eyes to look away, I saw Cole standing there by his table. I immediately walked over to shake his hand and tell him how amazing the bikes were and how much I enjoyed every detail. The dude couldn't of been any nicer, humble and very knowledgable, it was an instant bond made and I'm glad to call him a friend today. With so much talent and beautifully built machines it was a no brainer to ask Cole to bring one of his bikes to show at Fuel Cleveland on July 29th.

I sat down the other day with Cole and asked him a handful of questions to try and get to know the man behind the brilliance even more, here is what came of it. Enjoy.


-Mikey Revolt


photo by: Michael Lichter

Tell us a little about yourself...


C: My name is Cole Rogers and I started my own shop called 138 Cycle Fabrication in 2007 after building bikes at home and working at other shops. In 2001, I started working full-time in motorcycle shops. Before that I was a tool maker, welder, general fabricator, and electronics tech. I took every art class in school and still dabble a little with painting and drawing. I skateboarded a lot as a kid and listened to the Punk that goes hand in hand with it.




What does the 138 stand for in 138 Cycle Fabrication?



C: It is a song called "We Are 138" by my favorite band, The Misfits. It's a song that can be interpreted many ways but it's basically about non-conformity.

What got you into motorcycles?

C: When I was a kid, we lived 2 houses in from a main road that was used by bikers to get to a place called Gilberts Party Barn. This was the mid 80's so the Harley craze had not taken off yet. I would hear the bikes coming and I would run to stand as close to road as I could to watch what seemed like thousands of bikes go by. I would always look for the choppers. For some reason, I thought they were the coolest things in the world. Fast forward to 16 years old. My older brother had a BSA. When it quit running he told me if I could fix it I could ride it. I rode my skateboard to the library to check out a service manual. I got it running and I was hooked.




What was your very first build? What was the experience like, and the challenges you faced?
Anything you would do differently now that you know more on that first build?


C: I graduated from high school and one of the first things I did was start looking for a project. I bought a 1970 triumph engine, an old Columbus Customs Springer, and the front half of a frame from a guy named Limey R.I.P. Finding the rest of the parts was frustrating. That's when I realized to build the bike I wanted I was going to have to make some parts and learn to weld. I worked at a tool shop so I asked one of the welders to teach me how to weld. I was able to finish the bike and it was an amazing feeling to ride something I had built. I learned a lot from that first build. The most important thing I learned is RED LOCTITE! The only thing I would do differently on that first build knowing what I know now would be weld on the hardtail instead of bolting it on.

Photo by: Michael Lichter



What is your all time favorite build you have ever done?


C: My favorite build, is a bike I named "Salvador". It's a 1975 Sportster with the transmission cut off. I had seen it done before and had always wanted to do it my way. The ones I had seen always looked cool but they did not look right fitted to a big twin frame. This bike was for me so I could do anything I wanted with it. I had just sold my '58 XLH to a guy in Australia. It wasn't for sale but he threw out a number I could not turn down. This is the bike I will be bringing to the show.

Can you talk a little about your signature front end design and how that came about?

C: I'm not sure where the idea came from. Maybe old bicycles or other builders attempts at building something similar but I had a plan. I measured a ton of springers and stock front ends just to get some general dimensions. I drew up all of the drawings for every part and then took the design to my dad to look it over. My dad is literally a rocket scientist. He worked in solid rocket propulsion at Wright Patterson Air Force base for 32 years. He took a look at my design, made a few small changes and told me to get busy. I built the first one with low expectations but it turned out amazing. It rides like a new narrow glide. I call it the Bullet Girder but it is really a knee action front end. I got a patent on it in 2010 and it is the favorite of my customers.



What is your ultimate dream machine that you wish you could own one day or do you already own it?

C: I already have my dream car. I have a 1959 Corvette that my Grandfather bought new, then it was my Dad's and now it's mine. It has never been "restored". We only fix or replace things that wear out. My Dad says it runs and rides the same as it did when it was new. My dream motorcycle would be to build a bike with an Ariel square four engine.



Is there a certain style you look for when building or does it change build to build?


C: I don't try to fit into a certain style. I just build what I think looks cool. I guess I have my own style. A lot of my bikes have a similar look because I'm always trying to build what I think is perfect for each customer..




Who or what inspires you?

C: I think a lot of my inspiration comes from early race bikes. They were small and stripped down and there is just something about them that kind of calls to me. The craftsmanship of street rods inspires me to really focus on the fit and finish of my bikes. And of course old punk rock inspires me to just forge ahead. Fuck what's happened in the past. Let's live now.



What is the process like for you when building a bike? How long does it usually take?


C: My building process starts with the frame. I think about what I want the overall stance of the bike to be and then I set the jig up where I think it will best match the stance I want. After the frame is done I put the drive train in, the back wheel on and set the ride height. I really don't have a plan further than that. The bike then kind of builds itself after that. My builds usually take 3 to 4 months.

What is one of the biggest highlights, awards or things you done in your career that you are proud of?


C: The biggest highlight of my career was winning the International Master Bike Builders Association national championship.










Are you a movie on the couch or going to the theater type guy? 

C: I'm a movie on the couch guy unless it's a Syfy movie like Star Wars. I have to see those in the theater.

Name one band that is always on repeat in your garage.

C: The Misfits

Any life mottos or words of wisdom that you live by?


C:You only live once. Live in the now!

Is there anyone you would like to give a shout out to or thank?
 

C: I would like to thank my wife. Without her I would be nothing. My daughter for being my BFF and my dad for always saying "just do it yourself".




Make sure to check out Cole's bike "Salvador" and his booth at Fuel Cleveland on July 29th and be prepared to be blown away by the craftsmanship of his work!





DUMPTRUCK and KIT pull together a ROLLER DERBY Night of Thrills and Spills!


* ROLLER DERBY *

Dumptruck and Wussarmy Kit have been talking for a about a year now trying to arrange / set up a Kit's Kulture Ride to a Roller Derby and they finally made it happen! I'll tell you what, we got to eat some chicken, take a ride across town and see the Beach Cities Roller Derby v. the Los Angeles Flakers and it was awesome!!! Love the vibe, the coed-intensity and the endless action! Huge thanks to Dumptruck for pulling this together. We'll definitely be doing it again (soon) and we'll have a better advanced notice (two week minimum) for those of you who wanted to attended but got trapped into prior engagements. Sorry... your loss.











Greatest announcer ever, yep, that's Dumptruck up there (purposefully) mispronouncing names and throwing game facts right at yah'


...and then someone says "you didn't take pictures of any motorcycles?" ok, sorry, we were too busy partying... next time. Be there!

Make Friends Not Fans
pics by Lady_Alizon

TACOS DON'T CONTAIN ANY ....ORPHAN TEARS? pt.2 BERTH 55


Taco Moto Tuesday at (a place I've never been before) Berth 55 "thanks for all the fish!" Location was loved by everyone & great atmosphere! ...and after party at the V Room













Future dates and locations at:
@TacoMotoTuesday on the IG

Finishing the Speed Dealers Customs Switchbox installation

It's time to make the connections on these switchboxes.


Yes, I am always doing things the hard way and learning what would be easier next time. So I bought 16 gauge wire and should have done 20 gauge. I'm trying to do the solder connections on the bike by myself. I'm doing a mechanical connection and solder connection with one wire that is too big. Next time, do the connections on the bench with smaller wire and better holding tools or some help.

Be sure to put the shrink wrap on the wire before soldering the joint.(That's an old lesson.)


Man this was tough and slow.


Pull the shrink wrap down.


It's always a good idea to do a buzz box continuity check on a switch once you've finished soldering the wires.


 Next lesson, don't make straight joints, I really don't like the way those will rub inside the bars. ugh.


Tried to save this switch, but getting the solder flowing and the mechanical joint apart by myself just wasn't happening. Luckily, I picked up spares of all the switches when the local Radio Shack closed up and had everything on clearance.


Fresh switch soldered up.


Shrink wrapped.


Bad picture, but I used liquid tape to cover anything the shrink wrap didn't.


The brake light connections should be easier using the Kawasaki master cylinder and switch.


Simple, like crimp and solder.


Shrink wrap.


More shrink wrap to make it less orange.


Well, this wasn't exactly thought out all the way. So I am using the Kawasaki Vulcan controls. I am a tad concerned that the customization on the clutch lever might fail. I had thought no big deal, just carry a stock style shovelhead lever with the rest of the spares. Well, the Kawasaki clutch perch is a one piece clamp and the flush mount switch boxes don't really lend themselves to quick road side swap. A roadside rig up is still possible though.


Luckily for me, Lummy showed up to help and educate me on doing the left side switches. He said don't worry about threading the wire through the hole on the tabs. Thin the wire as I had done on the right side.


Tin the wires.


So you get something like this.


Tin the terminals.


Something like this.


Now just heat the wire and terminal and everything will stick.


Cut off the extra wire. This is not as mechanically strong, but you shouldn't be yanking on the wires for the most part.


Slide up the shrinkwrap, and paint everything with the liquid tape. (Lummy doesn't slow down for pictures.)


Same process for the horn button.


Left side switches good to go. About a hour for all this work with Lummy compared to like 3 hrs for my solo work on the right side switch.


Continuity checks for all the switches in every position.

Blue loctite on all the little nuts.


Add some extension to the voltmeter wires.


I got the headlight connected to the switch. The new set up means a mess of wire connections around the top tree instead of between the tanks. I'm going to have to clean that up a bit. Then I ran out of spade terminals before I could finish up the wires, so moved on to work on the front brake and fender.


Share This



         
CHOP CULT HOME

 

ADVERTISE    |    CONTACT    |    ©2009 - 2017 ChopCult    |    REPORT ABUSE    |    CONDUCT


Chopcult on Instagram Chopcult on Pinterest Chopcult on Tumblr Chopcult on Facebook Chopcult on Twitter