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My motto is...


...If you can't beat 'em, might as well look better.

Wasn't a boyscout, and never made one in school, so this was my first time fooling around with a pinewood derby car. So my boy brings one home from church a couple weeks ago, and in true Dailey fassion, we wait til the night before he needs it to start on it. I've got to admit it was cool watching him pick up a block and sandpaper for the first time.
This is what we ended up with. It ain't the fastest, but it took best in show twice this week, and he's stoked...
                                 although he may not look like it!
If anyone out there know's the trick on making it go faster, hit me up. It couldn't weigh in over 5oz, and this one is right on the money. I'm thinking weight placement is the trick?

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Commented on 3-3-2012 At 10:46 pm
 

When I'z in cubscouts my dad carved me a vintage sprintcar looking pinewood derby car, we painted it candyapple red...petroleum jelly on the axels won me a race...true story.

Commented on 3-3-2012 At 11:55 pm
 

The wheels on that one look different than the ones we had but what we did was put graphite powder on the axle then made a hub cap type deal with some of that metal tape and filled that with more graphite. For the weight we drilled holes in the bottom of the car, melted lead fishing weights and poured it in the holes. won a race or two with while my brother went for the looks and made some that looked like la mans cars.

Commented on 3-4-2012 At 01:43 am
 

haha thats cool as! your son will learn a lot from you bro hey so ya into church thats cool too..........

Commented on 3-4-2012 At 10:01 pm
 

just remembered.....we cleaned-up the wheels with fine sandpaper too

Commented on 3-4-2012 At 10:17 pm
 

weight placement, graphite, and solid one piece axles, as opposed to the nail-in axles that came with mine. wedge shaped, and the weight towards the middle-front. carve out a spot in the middle for it to sit flush with the "belly" of the car. thats what mine was. but i had a slingshot dragster look to it with pipes and shit. still got it too lol.check your rules, because some places dont allow the solid axles. just my 0.02 good luck!

Commented on 3-5-2012 At 03:37 pm
 

tight men, thanks for the input!

Commented on 3-5-2012 At 04:35 pm
 

One trick we used to do was take the axles and polish them makes them lighter and move faster

Commented on 5-21-2012 At 10:20 pm
 

the weights in the undercarrige are right on the money, alond with the solid axels, make sure you graphite the shit out of them to reduce the friction... and a nice solid coating right before it goes on the track isn't the worst thing either. you can also tunel the center, and insert a ball bearing. keep in mind the weight. hold a magnet in the back while it's at the top of the track, and when you release, it sounds the baring forward, and almost acts like a turbo. i know, i was a huge nerd. but hey i won. hope it helps out the little booger brah, i can't wait till mines old enough so we can put something together!
GOOD LUCK!!!

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