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Fuel Cleveland 2018 Builder Series: Brian Petronchak - Revelry Custom Cycles


Fuel Cleveland 2018 Builder Series Profile:

Name: Brian Pentronchak
Shop: Reverly Custom Cycles
Location: Pittsburgh, PA
Build: 1970 Triumph TR6c

11.21.17 - Intro


We met Brian Spentronchak at Fuel Cleveland 2017, he brought with him to the show a beautiful 1966 pearly white Triumph TR6 that he had finished up a few months prior to the show. He randomly reached out to us via email with some great pics of the bike and we couldn't say no to him because the bike was done so well. Also, let's not forget to mention Brian is probably one of the nicest guys you will ever meet. A couple months ago Todd at Lowbrow Customs was selling a pretty beat up Triumph chopper for really cheap. Brian swung by and swooped it up before anyone even had a chance to look at it and told us he wanted to build it for Fuel. With us knowing what Brian brings to the table with his talents, we happily extended the invite again to Brian for a "Triumphant" return and for him to unveil this build on July 28th, 2018 at Fuel Cleveland.  


Words from Brian:
I've been riding dirt bikes since I was 7 years old, which led to racing motocross up until I was about 18. After riding and racing for all those years naturally I wanted a street bike. I bought my first crotch rocket when I was 19 and had a blast riding with friends doing stupid shit like riding 90mph wheelies on the highway and ripping the amazing twisty back roads here in Western Pennsylvania. After literally breaking my neck a year after buying my first street bike I decided to take a break from riding for a few years.
Brian's first Harley - 2008 Street Bob he modified.
I eventually picked up a Triumph speed triple and got back into riding and fell in love with motorcycles all over again. At this point most of my buddies rode modern Harleys and I was curious to see what they were all about so I picked up a 2008 Street Bob. I really fell in love with the laid back riding and just enjoying having the wind in your face and without having to be riding balls to the wall. I've worked in a custom car shop for 15 years as a installer/fabricator so fabrication and designing parts is something I'm familiar with just in a different way. I built some custom parts for my Dyna such as handlebars, exhaust, and a few other things but never did a full build. I started building bikes after visiting a friend in Florida for Biketoberfest about 3 years ago. I had never really been exposed to the vintage chopper scene until then and after going to a few shows and seeing how much soul these old bikes have I immediately fell in love. 
1966 Triumph TR6 Brian Built and showcased at Fuel Cleveland 2017 - Photo by: David Carlo

When I got home from that trip I started trolling Craigslist for something to build and found a bunch of Ironheads and Shovelheads but I've always had a love for the vintage Triumphs. I eventually found a 1966 Triumph TR6 so my wife and I drove across the state to Harrisburg and picked it up. It was my first full bike build and I was a little intimidated at first but after I got the ball rolling it all just kinda came together. Places like Lowbrow Customs made it very easy to build when it came to getting parts such as weld on tabs, threaded bungs, and all the other pieces it took to build. When the bike was finished I returned to Florida to visit my buddy for bike week very proud of the bike I built but had no idea how many other people were going to love to. It won a few awards and even got a full feature in Cycle Source magazine. 
When I got home from that trip I found myself constantly working on my friends bikes building exhausts and doing other modifications and even making custom parts for people who had seen my work and that's when Revelry Custom Cycles started. It's not a full time thing mostly just my friends and I drinking beer, getting loud, and building motorcycles which is where the name Revelry came from. Although things have dramatically calmed down around here since my wife and I welcomed our first child into the world this past summer. 
The TR6c purchased from Todd was beat.

 

I've never been good at putting my ideas on paper so for me building a bike is a trial and error process just trying different things until I find something I'm happy with. My plan for the bike I'm currently building is more of a lane splitter style trying to keep everything real tight and skinny. I enjoy bikes that are over the top but that's not really my style, I'm more of a “less is more” kinda guy. I love clean and classy with details you really have to look for spread throughout the bike. 
So far I have mocked up a Lowbrow Customs tank, fender, and bolt-on hard tail. The frame has been cleaned up and the motor is getting ready to be rebuilt. I've built a custom exhaust using 2 of the Biltwell build your own kits. I bent up a small sissy bar and I am now in the process of building some handlers and getting the spring seat mounts done. I still need to do all the final welding because everything is just tacked on for now and then I will be sending the tins over to Steve Hennis for paint.



Make sure to follow along with Brian and his every move with this build via his Instagram page @revelrycustomcycles. We will also post updates through out the months leading up to the show of his progress on this thread. We eagerly can't wait for the unveiling of this 1970 Triumph TR6c at Fuel Cleveland on July 28th, 2018!

Stripped down and cleaned up the frame, also used a Lowbrow Customs Bolt-on hard tail kit.
Motor out getting ready to get rebuilt.
Vertical oil bag.

 

Mock up is getting closer to being complete. I have to finish all my welds to get ready for paint & chrome.

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