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Anthony Hicks










Roaming through the social media channels a little over a year ago, I randomly stumbled upon some beautiful art of a hotrod and an old truck racing down a dirt road. I immediately clicked on the profile of Anthony Hicks to check out more. As I dug deeper and deeper into his profile, I fell absolutely in love with getting lost within the images that were in front of my eyes. It felt almost as David Mann was resurrected and making new imagery again but with bolder and edgier beauty. With bitchin' choppers, amazing cars, naked babes, and beautiful sceneries all packed into intricately detailed pieces of work; it makes you wish you were right there in the moment. Anthony really knows how to put the soul of motorcycles, hot rods, and life into a canvas. When I asked Anthony to showcase some of his work at this year's Fuel Cleveland, he immediately got back to me with the most humble yes. Not only is the dude extremely talented but he's down to earth and real as they come...

The other night I got a chance to ask Anthony a handful of questions and this is what came of it, enjoy.


-Mikey Revolt


Tell us a little about yourself.

A: Shit... this is the part where I'm suppose to make myself sound fucking radder than I really am. Some would say I'm a artist, but I hate that fucking word (artist). That term use to mean something back in the day and now it just means your unemployed or something. But anyway, I have a love hate relationship with painting hot rods, motorcycles and naked chicks. Ever since I was a kid I've been fascinated by machines with wheels and I guess I never really out grew that state of mind. I build mainly traditional styled hot rods and customs and the occasional chopper in my spare time. But the main thing I do that people know is my paintings. I'm a country boy who lives out in the middle of no where with my fine as fuck wife, who's way outta my league, and my pit bull named Demon.   


What was your favorite thing to do when you were a teenager?

A: Well my favorite thing to do when I was a teenager was ride my BMX bike and steal Deftones albums from the record stores. Everything else I'll plead the 5th on. 



Who or what got you into painting?

A: I've always been into art but I didn't really get serious about it till I saw some of Tom Fritz paintings and David Mann paintings. Then shortly after that I saw Keith Weesners paintings and my fucking head about blew off my shoulders cause it was so cool. So I figured I could try and ride all these dudes coat tails and paint the things I love like cars and bikes like they did. But as years went past my shit started taking a life of its own because i stopped painting things I thought people would love and buy, and focused on painting the things I really loved and thought was cool with a fuck everyone else attitude. Then when I did that the shit blew up in my face cause more people ended up liking the raw raunchy paintings that I was into and not the safe match the couch shit I thought I should be painting.




When did you get hooked into the custom car and motorcycle scene?

A: Man I got hooked on custom cars and bikes the first time I saw Jesse James's 54 Chevy way back in the day as a kid! Then I saw his first motorcycle mania shows on discovery channel and was like "that mother fuckers speakin' my language with hot rods and bikes and strippers and shit"! Some guys my age will play that fucking cool card and give you some sexy answer and pretend Jesse James didn't fuck peoples world up but I'm a no body with nothing to gain, and no one to lie to, nor impress. And after that, I dove head first into the scene learning as much as I could from my grandpa and all the old timers that hung around his shop.




Do you stick to painting or are there other mediums of art that you dabble in?

A: Not really man, I kinda just stick to whats most comfortable that I know I can do pretty well which is painting. I cant sculpt bikes and cars and chicks getting banged all in one scene. And truth be told, If it ain't got tits or tires on it then I ain't interested in it.



Your stuff is so intricate and detailed, where do you find the patience and time to complete a piece, and how long does it usually take to complete a piece?

A: This is where the love hate relationship thing kicks in on these paintings...
So I've said many times to people that my favorite part of painting is starting the mother fucker and finishing the mother fucker, all that shit in between is an all out war. Where do I find the patience? I honestly don't know. I think it maybe the personal challenge of cramming in as much information as I can from my thought process and the thought of trying to one up other painters. I think the truth lies somewhere between those two things. It usually takes me about 3 months or so to complete a painting largely due to the fact I have to much shit going on at one time, like chopping tops on cars or pinstriping someones chopper tank or just feeling lazy and unmotivated to do anything creative. These paintings drain the shit out of me so sometimes I have to get my motivation back either through movies or looking at other art or when people say nice things about my shit. All of those are what keeps me coming back for more.  




What are your favorite subjects to focus on?

A: I wish I had a sexy answer for this question to but I don't. I just like to paint old cars and old bikes with some cool dudes doing some cool shit. Then I like to sprinkle in some hot chicks doing nasty shit for flavor. Thats really the recipe. Nothing ground breaking and thought provoking... just the same shit the cave men painted on walls since the dawn of man but adding gasoline and tires to it. 
But now that I think about it I really enjoy doing the landscapes behind the scenes. I guess there's something just calming about it to me.

Do you work of off pictures or things you see in your mind?

A: Yeah, I use a lot of reference material like most artist do. I don't know how to paint Panheads from the top of my head or remember exactly every line on a '32 for coupe or anything so I definitely have to use pictures and stuff for that. I can paint asses from my head though! 




What other hobbies or things your are into that some people may not know about you?

A: As a kid I was really into flatland BMX. And I still love it today even though I don't hardly ride anymore. Other than that I think I'm a pretty easy read cause I flaunt everything I'm into on social media.

Who or what inspires you and your work?

A: Besides the artist I've mentioned before my friends really inspire me. I have a great group of dudes that are funny as hell and live life not giving a fuck. 

If you could only have one motorcycle for the rest of your life what would it be?

A: I'm really into early board track racers so if I could have one bike it would be a 1915 Flying Merkel twin.

Is there a place in the world you have to see before you die?

A: There's tons of places I'd like to go and see but I don"t think I can narrow down a single place cause they all have there own pieces of coolness. But if I had to pic I would wanna go to Hawaii with my wife and tour that place for a few weeks.  

What is your all time favorite artist?

A: Constable.

Are you a Super Nintendo or Sega Genesis kinda guy?

A: I've never been a video game guy. I can't sit still that long. I grew up in the country so I come from the bicycle, skateboard, and tree fort era. 




Do you live by any codes or life mottos?

A: Yep. I always tell people that I live my life like a car crossing the finish line upside down, on fire, in reverse.

Anyone you would like to give a shout out to or thank?

A: Yeah, I'd like to give a shout out to my wife for having my back no matter if I'm wrong or not and all my friends and family for supporting everything I've done and always being my first customers to buy my shit. And thank you to all the people who have bought my prints and shirts over the years. Ya'll are the biggest reason I do this and continue to sit down in front of my paintings. Thank you! 




Make sure to check out Anthony's work on display at this year's Fuel Cleveland on July 29th, and if you see him roaming around the show, be sure to say hi. 

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Cole Rogers - 138 Cycle Fabrication

While walking through the motorcycle section of the Piston Power Show two years ago, I stumbled upon this insane looking Sportster. My eyes were locked onto it from across the walk way and I couldn't stop myself from walking towards it if I tried. The front end was like nothing I had ever seen before and the stance was so low. Right beside it was another one with a similar style but an Ironhead. With all the normalcy that show gives, there where these two diamonds hiding in the rough. As I finally fought my eyes to look away, I saw Cole standing there by his table. I immediately walked over to shake his hand and tell him how amazing the bikes were and how much I enjoyed every detail. The dude couldn't of been any nicer, humble and very knowledgable, it was an instant bond made and I'm glad to call him a friend today. With so much talent and beautifully built machines it was a no brainer to ask Cole to bring one of his bikes to show at Fuel Cleveland on July 29th.

I sat down the other day with Cole and asked him a handful of questions to try and get to know the man behind the brilliance even more, here is what came of it. Enjoy.


-Mikey Revolt


photo by: Michael Lichter

Tell us a little about yourself...


C: My name is Cole Rogers and I started my own shop called 138 Cycle Fabrication in 2007 after building bikes at home and working at other shops. In 2001, I started working full-time in motorcycle shops. Before that I was a tool maker, welder, general fabricator, and electronics tech. I took every art class in school and still dabble a little with painting and drawing. I skateboarded a lot as a kid and listened to the Punk that goes hand in hand with it.




What does the 138 stand for in 138 Cycle Fabrication?



C: It is a song called "We Are 138" by my favorite band, The Misfits. It's a song that can be interpreted many ways but it's basically about non-conformity.

What got you into motorcycles?

C: When I was a kid, we lived 2 houses in from a main road that was used by bikers to get to a place called Gilberts Party Barn. This was the mid 80's so the Harley craze had not taken off yet. I would hear the bikes coming and I would run to stand as close to road as I could to watch what seemed like thousands of bikes go by. I would always look for the choppers. For some reason, I thought they were the coolest things in the world. Fast forward to 16 years old. My older brother had a BSA. When it quit running he told me if I could fix it I could ride it. I rode my skateboard to the library to check out a service manual. I got it running and I was hooked.




What was your very first build? What was the experience like, and the challenges you faced?
Anything you would do differently now that you know more on that first build?


C: I graduated from high school and one of the first things I did was start looking for a project. I bought a 1970 triumph engine, an old Columbus Customs Springer, and the front half of a frame from a guy named Limey R.I.P. Finding the rest of the parts was frustrating. That's when I realized to build the bike I wanted I was going to have to make some parts and learn to weld. I worked at a tool shop so I asked one of the welders to teach me how to weld. I was able to finish the bike and it was an amazing feeling to ride something I had built. I learned a lot from that first build. The most important thing I learned is RED LOCTITE! The only thing I would do differently on that first build knowing what I know now would be weld on the hardtail instead of bolting it on.

Photo by: Michael Lichter



What is your all time favorite build you have ever done?


C: My favorite build, is a bike I named "Salvador". It's a 1975 Sportster with the transmission cut off. I had seen it done before and had always wanted to do it my way. The ones I had seen always looked cool but they did not look right fitted to a big twin frame. This bike was for me so I could do anything I wanted with it. I had just sold my '58 XLH to a guy in Australia. It wasn't for sale but he threw out a number I could not turn down. This is the bike I will be bringing to the show.

Can you talk a little about your signature front end design and how that came about?

C: I'm not sure where the idea came from. Maybe old bicycles or other builders attempts at building something similar but I had a plan. I measured a ton of springers and stock front ends just to get some general dimensions. I drew up all of the drawings for every part and then took the design to my dad to look it over. My dad is literally a rocket scientist. He worked in solid rocket propulsion at Wright Patterson Air Force base for 32 years. He took a look at my design, made a few small changes and told me to get busy. I built the first one with low expectations but it turned out amazing. It rides like a new narrow glide. I call it the Bullet Girder but it is really a knee action front end. I got a patent on it in 2010 and it is the favorite of my customers.



What is your ultimate dream machine that you wish you could own one day or do you already own it?

C: I already have my dream car. I have a 1959 Corvette that my Grandfather bought new, then it was my Dad's and now it's mine. It has never been "restored". We only fix or replace things that wear out. My Dad says it runs and rides the same as it did when it was new. My dream motorcycle would be to build a bike with an Ariel square four engine.



Is there a certain style you look for when building or does it change build to build?


C: I don't try to fit into a certain style. I just build what I think looks cool. I guess I have my own style. A lot of my bikes have a similar look because I'm always trying to build what I think is perfect for each customer..




Who or what inspires you?

C: I think a lot of my inspiration comes from early race bikes. They were small and stripped down and there is just something about them that kind of calls to me. The craftsmanship of street rods inspires me to really focus on the fit and finish of my bikes. And of course old punk rock inspires me to just forge ahead. Fuck what's happened in the past. Let's live now.



What is the process like for you when building a bike? How long does it usually take?


C: My building process starts with the frame. I think about what I want the overall stance of the bike to be and then I set the jig up where I think it will best match the stance I want. After the frame is done I put the drive train in, the back wheel on and set the ride height. I really don't have a plan further than that. The bike then kind of builds itself after that. My builds usually take 3 to 4 months.

What is one of the biggest highlights, awards or things you done in your career that you are proud of?


C: The biggest highlight of my career was winning the International Master Bike Builders Association national championship.










Are you a movie on the couch or going to the theater type guy? 

C: I'm a movie on the couch guy unless it's a Syfy movie like Star Wars. I have to see those in the theater.

Name one band that is always on repeat in your garage.

C: The Misfits

Any life mottos or words of wisdom that you live by?


C:You only live once. Live in the now!

Is there anyone you would like to give a shout out to or thank?
 

C: I would like to thank my wife. Without her I would be nothing. My daughter for being my BFF and my dad for always saying "just do it yourself".




Make sure to check out Cole's bike "Salvador" and his booth at Fuel Cleveland on July 29th and be prepared to be blown away by the craftsmanship of his work!





DUMPTRUCK and KIT pull together a ROLLER DERBY Night of Thrills and Spills!


* ROLLER DERBY *

Dumptruck and Wussarmy Kit have been talking for a about a year now trying to arrange / set up a Kit's Kulture Ride to a Roller Derby and they finally made it happen! I'll tell you what, we got to eat some chicken, take a ride across town and see the Beach Cities Roller Derby v. the Los Angeles Flakers and it was awesome!!! Love the vibe, the coed-intensity and the endless action! Huge thanks to Dumptruck for pulling this together. We'll definitely be doing it again (soon) and we'll have a better advanced notice (two week minimum) for those of you who wanted to attended but got trapped into prior engagements. Sorry... your loss.











Greatest announcer ever, yep, that's Dumptruck up there (purposefully) mispronouncing names and throwing game facts right at yah'


...and then someone says "you didn't take pictures of any motorcycles?" ok, sorry, we were too busy partying... next time. Be there!

Make Friends Not Fans
pics by Lady_Alizon

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