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  1. #1
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    Default Swedish Survivor?

    Anyone know anything about this bike?

    Click image for larger version. 

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  2. #2

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    I am not sure about the model and year of this bike but I am sure it is a classic considering its design.

  3. #3
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    Default

    what is it you are looking to find?

  4. #4

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    The chick, Victim 6

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    What do you want to know??? The bike is obviously a 650 Triumph, based on what little I can see its likely a 64-66 based on the kicker cover . Its a twin carb head, but the bottom end could be TR6 or T120 But I cant see close enough to see the cam follower oiler plug so cant say for sure on year, or the style of head (71 earlier or later) and the timing side would be more clues.

    Its obviously got some molding on the frame some tabs cut off,, old school sissy, seat and lights, Its got extended forks but unclear whats the story on rake, its got a early small hub SLS brake, and sliders so indicates again likely 64-66.
    The pipes are after market slash cut TT style pipes, likely Cycle Shack.
    Some moron lost the points cover too,, probably still running points they adjust with a beer can & a rock on the side of the road.
    Typical Hex chromed steel aftermarket oil bag.
    looks like it was ridden hard, put away wet.

    I have no idea the builder, or any history,, its just a random old Triumph 650. The chick looks super cute and reminds me of a friend I have known since 1st grade but the lady I know is now mid 50s and aged well, but that chick looks young. So,,, thats what I know. Does it answer your question?

    What exactly IS your question? Are you hoping its the same bike used in a movie? Celebrity owned? Hot for the chickie? Just like the style? Wondering WHERE you can find a hot chopper chick to pose for pix?
    (Try Model MAYHEM,,, I have used some local models and had good experiences.)

    https://www.modelmayhem.com/

    One of the best did several events for me and did an awesome job. But sadly she moved to Chicago. Miss CJ the Model. We had to tone things down for the Museum events, (Family friendly and some of the board members were pretty conservative, so she wore a 50s outfit, but she also did more risque stuff too.)
    Click image for larger version. 

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    I have another lady,, tatted up local stripper/dancer who rocks the Betty Page look, and a couple more. Really ups your game for events when you have pro models to market your products or gigs.

    A guy up in Seattle, Super cool dude, Seige, the artist. He has a bevy of super hot girl next door types, that are not your typical plastic fake duck lips posers,, But they fit his products and image perfectly.
    See: https://wischt.com/M/siegeshirts-models.htm

    Im a big fan of Irish Ema on the Manx Norton @ the Isle of Man, But lil' Red on the Dick Mann built BSA Goldie is a hot number.

  6. #6

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    What he said, more or less. I’d say the bike was probably chopped in the mid-70s, people didn’t chop new bikes, too expensive. Extended forks, no rake, another common 70s practice.

    I had assumed the photo was recent and it’s a barn find. The girl certainly isn’t dressed for the era.

  7. #7
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    Sorry about the randomness of the question. I believe the shot was taken in Sweden.
    Sweden seems to have a number of untouched survivor bikes, and was way ahead of the curve in terms of build quality when I was younger. Sweden seems to be less overpopulated than the UK. That equals more space to stash things away safely, and lots more nice bikes.
    There are few survivor bikes in the UK, and those left seem to be generally known about. Just wondered. Long shot really. I like the bike.

  8. #8
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    What DTIA said, it was common in ancient times (good for ease of duplication) and the rust shows it sat unloved for a while.

    The look is VERY easy to duplicate. The lack of cheap HDs overseas (and in the US) led to chopping anything with two wheels.

    If you want one find whatever you can register and slap it together. Single carbs are less hassle on any twin and the trivial difference in top end only matters with sporting machines or to autist collectors. Basket case Triumph twins and parts abound. I'd prefer one with a four speed as they were tougher than the fives (and interchange, but do your homework and ask Doug as he'll likely know all the minor differences off the top of his head).

    One of those should be quite inexpensive to build. Harley rear rim kits can be had for near anything and were frequently inflicted on Triumphs. Pullback handlebars are an "acquired taste" I'd promptly throw in the scrap bin. A titled front frame (the frames are two-piece and the front looks to have begun life as a stock part) can be bolt-on or weld-on hardtailed easily enough. Use quality hardware as those fasteners are heavily loaded. The frame is "molded" with filler typical of the era and it does tidy things up nicely. Modern epoxies are tougher than styrene fillers so I'd check out those options if you want molding that's less likely to crack but many jobs survived fine. You can adapt correct-looking 39mm HD forks to British frames if you want modern brakes, alloy triple clamps and sliders (though later TriBSA forks had alloy sliders, those are early steel hence the pitted chrome) and to run HD bars and risers.

    BTW if you do a Triumph replace everything electrical except the handlebar switches if they're still good. All the service manuals and parts books are easily downloaded free and parts are plentiful. For a chopper I'd keep the compression modest as the longest lived Britbikes are gently loaded. They hardly weigh anything so they don't require much HP to be fun.

    Doug might want to weigh in on a "best longevity" 650 build since any will normally need a top end job at least.

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    Are you in the market for one nearly exact as that? Im in the middle of some other projects, But if we could meet at a price we both can live with, I have a bunch of orphan chop baskets in storage,. I have the same sissy bar, tanks, pipes, seat what have you or variations of such. Cash talks,,,, But logistics might kill it,,

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    Shipping to the UK might be expensive but OTOH it's common for buyers to import US machines. Ensure any documentation like title is correct by UK standards.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dougtheinternetannoyance123 View Post
    Are you in the market for one nearly exact as that? Im in the middle of some other projects, But if we could meet at a price we both can live with, I have a bunch of orphan chop baskets in storage,. I have the same sissy bar, tanks, pipes, seat what have you or variations of such. Cash talks,,,, But logistics might kill it,,
    Thanks- if I wasn't 270 lbs i'd love to build/ride another Triumph. Oddly, there are two i'd like, one is the one I built as a 19 year old ( using all nos oem Triumph parts for the mechanicals). It's out there , but I know not where, in the UK so have largely given up. They say 'don't look back, you can never go back' may be i'm best off with the memories.
    The other one is my late buddies Triumph chop, but understandably he left this to his youngest son. I'm almost finished with my Pan, i need to get that off the ramp next!

  12. #12

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    Whatever it is it's a nice one! There were many freaks per capita in sweden in the 70's, and the bikes looked really extreme for the time.

  13. #13
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    The Triumph doesn't care how heavy you are. If you find a stock frame a bit cramped then a mild stretch solves that easily, say 2" on the downtubes and backbone or more if ya like, and say 14" apehangers should put the grips at shoulder height. There were plenty of tastefully stretched twins that look properly proportioned and ya can put the foot controls anywhere you want them easily it. Hardtail stretch can also add legroom.

    Stretch is something of a Swedish style trademark and worth a look for large humans.

  14. #14

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    “Finding bikes too small” is a fairly modern problem, resulting from excessively low seat heights. Back in the day, bikes routinely had bench seats of 30-31”, the oil-in-frame Triumph and BSA frames had 32 1/2” seat height as introduced, later reduced by about 1”. Anyone who thinks a Sportster is small, should try a 1960s style bench seat, or an XR1200 for that matter.

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