CHOP CULT HOME
Email Password
Search
  1. #1

    Default Diesel mechanics first bike build

    You will love it or hate it but here it is. I did another chinese clone conversion for the phenomenal fuel mileage but I gave mine some style. The donor bike (Suzuki gn400) did not have enough space for the engine and I had to also make it into a hardtail. I still have some obvious things to do like foot pegs, longer throttle cable, speedometer, and wire the lights but it's almost done. Click image for larger version. 

Name:	20201214_130648.jpg 
Views:	24 
Size:	321.7 KB 
ID:	107768

  2. #2

    Join Date
    Apr 2020
    Posts
    28

    Default

    Cool as shit with a diesel bike. What engine is it?

  3. #3

    Default

    It's a chinese clone of a yanmar L100. Reviews on them are somewhat mixed but if I blow it the actual yanmar is only a few hundred more and fairly easily obtained from a generator. Max RPM is only 3600 and it's comfortable at 3000 for long durations. If I did my math right the top speed will only be around 75 to 80 mph. I primarily want it for work and back or in town use though, so I really only need it to do 55. In the picture the clutches are on backwards and I had to flip them over for the rear one to engage correctly. I still need to come up with a way to lock the back brake while parked as it is essentially in neutral when the clutches are not engaged and I don't trust just leaving it sit on the kickstand. I should be able to take it for a test drive this weekend if the snow holds off and will have a better idea of speeds and what else needs modifying to work reliably. Others here may see things I missed in my build and I would appreciate your input as I have never built a bike before this one.

  4. #4
    Senior Member

    Content on this page requires a newer version of Adobe Flash Player.

    Get Adobe Flash player


    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    9,641

    Default

    Nicely proportioned! You've the proper eye for building motorcycles. It's clean and not gaudy or crude.

    I like the diesel idea and one would also be really cool in a dual-purpose bike also geared for around town as you could climb anything and diesels operate at any reasonable angle of attack.

    A slick and chopulent way to hold the rear brake would be a plate behind the brake pedal with a bushing welded to it to prevent the aircraft ball lock safety pin you use from tipping under load so your pedal is just where you want it. You can play with where that is and if the grip when depressed to the applied position begins to slip ya know it's time to adjust the rear brake. Get one with a fabric Remove Before Flight streamer as the plastic ones look cheap. I would do what I do and wear a paracord loop slling on my belt with a brass leash clip to make sure I never lose keys. When riding it will hold your ball lock pin by the stout keyring which holds the streamer plus every time ya remove your keys ya know to pull the pin. (I hate losing keys and live by paracord loops and brass clips which also control multi-tools nicely.)

    Diesel conversions and factory diesel bikes can be found around India. The Lombardini may be the version used in military light carts and civilian gensets.

    https://www.drivespark.com/two-wheel...ls-025157.html
    Last edited by farmall; 12-17-2020 at 4:35 PM.

  5. #5

    Default

    Good idea but I converted the rear brake to use a pull action from what used to be the clutch lever. I will probably end up hiding a small lever under the seat to put tension on the cable while parked. Click image for larger version. 

Name:	rear brake.jpg 
Views:	3 
Size:	312.9 KB 
ID:	107797

  6. #6
    Senior Member

    Content on this page requires a newer version of Adobe Flash Player.

    Get Adobe Flash player


    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Posts
    1,846

    Default

    Having both brakes on the handlebars will mess you up for crawling on anything else. I owned a 741 that had a sucacide clutch pedal and both brakes on the handlebars. But it did keep anyone else from riding it.
    Dusty

  7. #7

    Default

    I thought about that as well but figure that if I build another one I will most likely use another diesel motor that uses a similar setup. Because of the width of the engine and clutches my pegs will have to be rather far forward as well and a brake pedal hanging out in front of everything would have looked rather odd. If the brake was behind the peg for heel control it would have been very close to the shroud for the flywheel. I just felt it would be safer to have easy access and reliable control. Until now, minibikes with auto shifting jacks have been the closest I have been to riding a motorcycle so it isn't like I have to unlearn anything.

  8. #8
    Senior Member

    Content on this page requires a newer version of Adobe Flash Player.

    Get Adobe Flash player


    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    9,641

    Default

    If ya just want it not to roll a semi-hidden small valve to use as a line lock on the front hydraulic line would work fine while confusing the fuck out of potential thieves. Bike brake pressures are supposedly (I never had reason to put a gauge on one) only a few hundred psi max so something like this and perhaps with a kool vintage knob might be the ticket and would be easy to plumb.

    https://maxtonvalve.com/products/ind...product_id=166

  9. #9
    Senior Member

    Content on this page requires a newer version of Adobe Flash Player.

    Get Adobe Flash player


    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Posts
    1,846

    Default

    How about a tapered shim that slides between the lever and the lever pivot housing? Simple enough?
    Dusty

  10. #10
    Senior Member

    Content on this page requires a newer version of Adobe Flash Player.

    Get Adobe Flash player


    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Posts
    1,134

    Default

    I like it, looks light, simple, and agile compared to the beast I built, if I built another it would be much like yours, nice build. The bike I built is here if you search, "Turbo diesel Harley was it a good idea", if you wanna have a look. Also check out dethmachinefab he has built some rockin fast bikes. Here's the video that got me started.
    Last edited by klondikekid64; 12-19-2020 at 10:20 PM.

  11. #11

    Default

    I like the line lock idea. For that matter a thick rubber band over the brake lever would probably work but would look pretty tacky. I took it for a short ride yesterday and it feels great. The balance is perfect and it's a lot more responsive than I thought it would be. I finished up running the wires and just have to put the switches for the lights in the electrics can and hook them up.Click image for larger version. 

Name:	copy1.jpg 
Views:	3 
Size:	309.0 KB 
ID:	107821Click image for larger version. 

Name:	copy2.jpg 
Views:	4 
Size:	322.3 KB 
ID:	107822That turbo diesel sounds a lot more like a diesel than mine. Mine just sounds like an average thumper with some knocks and ticks. With a little rev the black smoke appears and they get a clue. https://youtu.be/OMMD6IA_Enc
    Last edited by ToroTuner; 12-21-2020 at 2:43 PM.

  12. #12
    Senior Member

    Content on this page requires a newer version of Adobe Flash Player.

    Get Adobe Flash player


    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Posts
    1,846

    Default

    I was a heavy equipment mechanic for 45 years and I got 'a disagree, it sounds just like a small na diesel.
    Dusty

  13. #13

    Default

    When I am sitting on it under power all I hear is the thump, thump, thump. At idle sure, but when I am riding it the thump drowns out the diesel noise. While there is no muffler there are baffles welded into the tail pipe for a small amount of back pressure. The baffles seem to deepen the tone and even out the rpm's compared to when it was free flowing. It's a lot more responsive than I was expecting and I am very pleased with how well it handles and gets up to speed. I haven't taken it very far yet and speeds have been 50mph or less but it seems to be just what I was after. I don't really care about over 50mph and at that speed it's happily chugging without over revving. When weather improves I will try some higher speeds just to see what it's max comfortable speed is but I primarily want it for in town, and the occasional ride through the rural areas or mountains outside of town. The way things are set up now it should be very comfortable and fuel efficient for it's intended purpose.

Share This



Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Log in

Log in