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  1. #1
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    Default '60 Pan Chop Rebuild

    It's been quite a few years since I was posting on this site. 2 kids, no time for builds, etc. I've done some small rebuilds of bikes that don't belong on this site (currently in the middle of a complete re-seal on a '77 BMW for instance). I've been wanting a pan for as long as I've been riding but haven't managed to find one in my price range with good numbers (a must in my book). A couple weeks ago the stars aligned for me and I picked this up from a friend-of-a-friend. Good numbers and matching bellies and the engine top-end was done not too many miles (but 15+ years) ago with new standard-bore cylinders and forged pistons. Not sure the compression ratio but not significantly higher than stock. Engine is/was a '60 FL, frame is supposedly a '57 although as far as I can tell all the casting numbers are molded over.

    Hasn't been on the road for 8-10 years. I like the overall bike, but it needs a lot of little things to fit my tastes/needs. First off it needs the usual to be on the road again; carb rebuild, go through the oil pump to fix the sumping (note the PO "fix" oil valve on the feed line), fix some wiring, figure out why the kicker is so loose on the shaft, etc. I also need to update it to my tastes; it needs some kind of unobtrusive front brake setup, better seat, fork stops, etc.

    Not exactly a build, not exactly a rebuild, but I find that posting helps keep me motivated in between my ~2 hours of shop time I get a week

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  2. #2
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    Looks like a hell of a start. Wish my stars would line up

  3. #3
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    Oh ya baby, now that is a sharp sled. Document the heck out of your rebuild, I live for that stuff.

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ID:	107675 haha that is cool.... as long as you don't forget to open it before you ride, can't leak if you wont let it

  5. #5
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    so nice. love the long CCW girder:
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    it needs some kind of unobtrusive front brake setup
    what are you thinking...one that actually works, or just unobtrusive?

    perhaps this small drum from K-Tech?

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    or something like this 7-1/2" disc unit by fabKevin?

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    Can get 6" diameter x 0.187" discs from Airheart (formerly Hurst/Airheart:

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    http://www.airheart-brakes.com/disc-chart.html
    Last edited by TriNortchopz; 12-14-2020 at 9:50 PM.

  6. #6
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    No, I want a front brake I can use. Not just a hill holder. I'm thinking a 21" laced to a star hub with an adapter to run a 7-8" rotor. Probably a rear rotor off something modern like this:

    https://www.ebay.com/i/283293471875

    Not sure what caliper yet. I actually have a couple H/A setups but I don't know if they're worth rebuilding and running. They were junk when they were new, I doubt they've improved with age I like the FabKevin setup but it's outta my price range for sure.

    Anyone know anything good or bad about the quality of the CCI star-hub repops? I've heard bad things about the V-Twin MFG ones. Are the CCI the same wheels just under a different badge? I've had generally ok luck with CCI products in the past.

    CCI P/N 18541:
    http://www.customchrome.com/dcm/cc/_...5_WHEEL_DL.pdf

    What I really wanted was a narrow Paughco star hub, but apparently they were discontinued a few years ago and no one's got any leftovers.

  7. #7
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    found this on JJ:

    Speaking of springer disc brake setups....

    " used a 2 piston Brembo caliper that was originally on the back of a Ducati Monster. Nice thing about this caliper, is the fact that the banjo bolt and the bleeder are the same thread, so you can switch them in the ports, so you can run them on either the R/H or L/H side of your wheel. I'm running mine on the R/H side. The caliper body clears the spokes by about a 1/4".

    I had Fab Kevin cut me one of his stainless floating brackets, and used an old 11 1/2" GMA iron floating rotor with an aluminum carrier I found at the swap meet, that I vented....

    Also, I don't know if everybody knows this, but Paughco has an aluminum adapter flange now that bolts to your '36-'66 star hub, in place of the drum, and allows you to bolt any 2000-up 11 1/2" disc directly to it. Paughco's part number for it is 236BRS."
    Irish Rich

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    https://www.jockeyjournal.com/forum/...d.php?t=201394

  8. #8
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    Early Sportster Drum Brake might net a old look .. ??

  9. #9
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    Not sure if this would be kosher:

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    Only thing that bugs me is thanks to the rake the scoop points at an upward angle. Not sure I can live with that lol. I'm also thinking I could keep the Evo front wheel that's on it and make room for a brake if I offset the rim about 1/4" and shift the hub entirely to the left side. I've got a small springer brake caliper. Gotta see if there's enough clearance to the spokes to get away with that. I could also machine the hub down where the rotor goes, but I'd have to unlace it entirely to do that.

  10. #10
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    For that '71-'72 Triumph dual-leading shoe, could you rotate it so the stud fits between the girder legs, while still having clearance for the rear brake arm? may need to modify the stud (3/8Whit/UNF x 1-13/16) a bit.

  11. #11
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    When I put this Triumph wheel on this stock rake girder I had to build a bracket to put the stud behind the girder. Looks to me like at your rake it will need to be in front. When you build it be sure its hell for stout. I can tell you for sure that you don't want one to break.

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    Dusty

  12. #12
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    That's a nice looking bike Dave. Unfortunately I can't rotate the wheel far enough to get it level without one of the brake arms hitting the girder leg. This is as close as it gets with ~1/4" clearance to the arm:

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    I've also got an extra star hub wheel that came with the bike. I'm currently snowed-in away from my "good" tools including a 7/16" allen wrench I need to get the brake off. Assuming the internals are in good shape and I have enough room to get a caliper mounted this would probably look the best on the front of the bike.

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  13. #13
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    I think that I would get that 1/4" down to 1/8" or slightly less and call it good. It's one of the best drum brakes I have ever had. It works way better than the Jap duel leading shoe I put on my 50. You could correct the angle of the front of the scoop with a grinder or saw.
    Dave
    Last edited by DustyDave; 12-16-2020 at 10:20 PM.

  14. #14
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    Dave, how does this Triumph wheel come apart? I unscrewed the big nut and took the brake plate off but the axle only moves a little in either direction. Before I hit it any harder is there something I'm missing? Also curious how you made your custom axle?

  15. #15
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    You just pull the snap rings and drive or push it apart.
    Maybe this will help
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    I chucked the Triumph axle up, center drilled it then parted it to length. Then spun an axle and spacers to fit the Indian girder. It was in 2010 or 11 so the details have slipped away.
    Dusty

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    I see now, it has a shoulder on the axle instead of a crush tube between the bearings. Any reason I could just make a straight axle with a crush tube inside the bearings and spacers outside instead of trying to mimic the shoulder on the stock axle?

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    Quote Originally Posted by JLeather View Post
    I see now, it has a shoulder on the axle instead of a crush tube between the bearings. Any reason I could just make a straight axle with a crush tube inside the bearings and spacers outside instead of trying to mimic the shoulder on the stock axle?

    Sure you could, but why reinvent the wheel. You already got all that machining in that axle in your hand. Most any machine shop could center drill that axle to the size the girder needs. I did it on a worn out Atlas Craftsman in an hour or so.
    Dusty

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    Valve could have been there to make oil changes easier. Too much braking on a front end with no real shock absorber can cause it to dive too hard and lose control. Airhard brakes were used in racing smaller bikes but they do have different compound pads to help them stop better . Shave off 2 feet off the sissybar and ride it. Get used to it before you make any changes. Could save you time and money.
    Cool bike.

  19. #19
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    @Dusty got the hub apart. I guess this one has never been apart before. What was giving me fits was the thin grease covers outside the bearings got wedged in the hub and I wasn't sure how hard I was allowed to hit it. Since it needs bearings anyway, and I wanna run sealed units, I ordered a set of 6204 conversion bearings (p/n 6204-5/8) that let you run a 5/8" axle directly in a 6204 bearing bore (47mm). I'll be able to run the Triumph wheel directly on the existing axle with a crush tube and a couple spacers. I figured for the reaction arm I'll drill out the whitworth threads and add a second hole to the brake plate and make a little steel triangle to mate up to the tab on the girder.

  20. #20
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    Sounds like a plan. If you can figure a way to keep the spacer centered or close to centered it will make your life much simpler if you ever end up installing the wheel on the side of the road. I own a Yamaha that the spacer falls so far to the bottom of the bore that keeping it centered enough to get the axle in is a nightmare to say the least. I assume that you are going to pilot the backing plate a ledge in the spacer on that side instead of bolting it to the axle.
    Dusty

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