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  1. #1
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    Default Who works with Brass?

    My neighbor dropped off an antique brass wood bucket. The bottom had been crimped onto the sides but over time it has let go. I was thinking I could solder it with a torch and solder. Will this work and what do I need to know before I start?

    Thanks,
    -DB

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    It's probably corroded within the crimp, so getting it clean enough to solder might be tough. If you can manage that, I would use silver with a suitable flux for strength.

    Jim

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    To get a decent joint the crimp will have to come apart, so you can clean it to bare metal. Unless you want to carry lead any good plumbing solder and flux should be fine. It will be just like sweating a copper pipe put the heat where you want the solder to go.
    Dusty

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    Thanks Gents,

    Going to take a bit of work to get it straight enough to solder, but should last them another 50 years when done.

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    I do all the repairs at the chrome shop and lots of car parts are made of brass, it's easy to work with and you don't need alot of heat, lightly sand blast, wire wheel, sandpaper to clean, use flux and I use 50/50 lead solder. Yesterday the copper buff wheel grabbed a Jag 1/4 side window frame outta my hands and came around in the blink of the eye and wacked my wrist , broke both bones, one was shattered. ahhh some days off. Lol.Click image for larger version. 

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    Oh damn Sam!

    I have shot pieces of trim across the room, but been lucky enough not to have one come back onto me. Sorry for the pain dude, hope it heals quick.

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    Quote Originally Posted by DoomBuggy View Post
    Oh damn Sam!

    I have shot pieces of trim across the room, but been lucky enough not to have one come back onto me. Sorry for the pain dude, hope it heals quick.
    thanks Doom, Yes most parts hit the floor or back wall, I always tell new guys learning to never put your hand thru any openings, and if it snags just let it go, it can always be fixed, headlight rings,luggage racks etc. are bad ones especially when copper buffing with the large 4"W x 17" cotton airwave buff wheel, 20yrs on and off polishing and it's my first bad one. good luck with your project. Potmetal and brass are my favorite metals to work with.Click image for larger version. 

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