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  1. #1

    Default will wheel set up work?

    hey guys trying to get my first bike setup and needed some help. just got this frame and wheel that i got, my question is will this wheel work in a rigid frame 4 speed panhead setup? if so what sprocket will i need/brake setup or sprockter? Any help would be great guys
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  2. #2
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    Start by centering the wheel to the backbone of the frame. Then, clamp a straightedge, yardstick or something, to the sprocket on the trans. This will tell you if you need a flat or dished sprocket. If it's set up for a dished sprocket and you've really got your heart set on a sproter brake set up (I think that's what you were trying to say) you can just space it out. I'm not a big fan of those, hard to keep the chain lubed without contaminating the brake pads.

    Is there a flange to bolt stuff to on the other side? If so, it's a lot easier to use some kind of disc brake setup on the right side. There are many to chose from. If it's not, check the bolt size on the left side. If that's a 5/16 thread, you have a front wheel.

  3. #3

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    yes the other side has a flange to bolt to. so if its 5/16 thread than the rim is unusable as a rear wheel?

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    Most alloy Harley dual disk front hubs have 5/16 on both sides
    Rear alloy hubs have 7/16 sprocket/pulley side, 3/8 disk side.
    Disc and sprocket bolt patterns are the same all 'round.
    To use a front hub on the rear simply drill and tap disc holes to accept the larger bolts.

    Like MOTher said, Center rim to backbone and decide if the hub will work or not.
    Remember to keep axle adjusters even while centering.
    And if the frame ain't straight, now is the time to remedy!
    Some people are ok with up to an inch off center
    The bike will still ride straight, but lean/turn dynamics will be uneven.


    Narrow frame + wide hub = fitment issues
    None insurmountable, some not worth the effort. You decide

    here are some tricks 'n' tips

    Threaded holes can be made smaller too, with inserts. Like helicoils or timesheets.
    Bolt holes in disks can be drilled out for bigger bolts.
    Or chamfered to take countersunk bolts.
    Small ID flange hole discs can be machined to fit larger flanged hubs.
    Sprockets and disks can be shimmed.
    Offset rear sprockets can be flipped for chain alignment (watch for chain rub at frame and tire).
    Hubs can be milled to an extent.
    Bearing swaps and/or axle adapters help when swapping Axle sizes (inner spacer length is critical)
    Don't use stainless fasteners, grade 8 , and do use locktite.
    Make sure the caliper runs centered on disk (shim and/or machine as necessary) brake drag is a real drag.
    Spoked rims can be tweaked left or right (via spokes) to compensate for off center hubs. But not by much without custom length spokes.
    Keep fender, chain/belt guard, and fender mounts in mind.
    Remember the wheel needs to move fore and aft in the Axle slots. Fender clearance and brake anchors that hinder chain adjustment are no bueno.

    At least you don't have to worry about a swingarm's arc of travel to spring rates or damping lol
    Oh yeah. Run an inner tube and air that back tire low, like 18-25 psi. Your back will thank you later.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sky View Post
    Oh yeah. Run an inner tube and air that back tire low, like 18-25 psi. Your back will thank you later.
    I run 15psi in the rear of all of my rigid bikes......... They don't weigh much so it's not a problem......... 28 psi in the front........ Especially if it's a narrow tire.........

    But to each his own...........

  6. #6

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    One learning experience I had, found a dual flange hub at a local swap meet and laced a 4 inch rear rim to it. Took it to Don's Custom to have the wheel limed up and asked for a take off disc brake rotor and was told that this is a front hub, stood there for a second and came up with this idea " you got a front rotor??", seems to have worked ok for the last 2500 miles.

  7. #7

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    There should be no issues with that wheel and hub.

    Just remember, one side is specific for the sprocket side. You can tell by the bolt size on which side is the sprocket side and which is the rotor side. (I cant remember which side has smaller bolts and which side the smaller bolt side goes to)

    Whats cool though is that the rear wheels on hds pretty much from when disc brakes were first used and up to and including 1999 will work with your project, whether the hub originally ran a pulley or sprocket

    Once you center the wheel, you then need to ensure the sprocket on the hub aligns with the tranny sprocket. This is the simplest/hardest part of the alignment. Not a hard job at all, it can be just a tad frustrating:

    Ok, center the wheel...I would do it with a tire mounted to ensure your chain will not interfere with the sidewall once you get it all GTG.

    Also keep in mind that the rear fender should NOT be used as a guide to center the wheel. Use the frame as a centering guide.

    You might want to mount the rear fender as well before you go further, again to make sure the tire and rear fedner do not make contact with the chain

    Then line up the sprockets. If they wont align without moving the rear wheel one way or the other (Left or right), consider the rear sprocket you are using. They make rear sprockets flat or slightly dished out. Use the one you need

    If you use your chain to align the sprockets, dont be tempted to cut the chain to fit IF TOO LOOSE at this point: Use a string instead, or a laser pointer, or other techniques I am sure others will share

    If you cut the chain to align at this point, dont be surprised that once the drive train is fully installed that you might be too short, and I would not run two master links

    GOOD LUCK, KEEP POSTING

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