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  1. #1

    Join Date
    Dec 2019
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    4

    Default 82’ FXB total electrical power loss

    Hey ya’ll

    I need your help. I recently got my (new to me) 82 FXB Sturgis up and running. Last week I took it for a ride and about 10 mins in she started to stumble and completely shut off as I coasted into the driveway. Zero electrical power across all systems. 2 month old battery reads 11.58v. All circuit breakers are good to go. I replaced the ignition switch ‘cause it didn’t come with a key and it’s def wired correctly. When I turn it to the 1st position, the oil and gen lights come on but their weak. About a minute later they go fully bright but still no headlight/ running lights. Push any button and the oil/ gen lights go off, then come back on (sometimes) fully after a minute or two. Turning the ignition switch to the start position makes all the power go off again. Is it possible the starter relay is bad and this is why I’m having this prob? Any help is greatly appreciated.

  2. #2
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    Your battery is all but dead, Take it out of the bike and fully charge it....... I don't care how old it is...... Then when you get it running again see if the bike is charging........... I bet it isn't.........

    Also check battery terminals...... Both ends........

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    Look at your battery cables. Are they tightly connected at both ends, and are any of the cable terminals cracked? I have seen ground cable terminals crack almost through, and so pass just enough current to light the dash lamps, nothing else. And, a typical AGM battery at 11.5V is about 1/4 charged only, so your alternator may not be charging, or the battery itself is bad. Alternator output with a fully charged battery should be 14.2V, it will show lower with a discharged battery.

    Jim

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tattooo View Post
    Your battery is all but dead, Take it out of the bike and fully charge it....... I don't care how old it is...... Then when you get it running again see if the bike is charging........... I bet it isn't.........

    Also check battery terminals...... Both ends........
    We are typing simultaneously. And that is scary.

    Jim

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    Quote Originally Posted by JBinNC View Post
    We are typing simultaneously. And that is scary.

    Jim
    LOL Yea and said all but the same thing....... LOL

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    Your ignition switch is grounding out.

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    Shucks, I've I'd been online earlier it would have been triplicate posts.

    http://cycleelectricinc.com/Diagnosi...%20Battery.htm

    Remember 1982 was nearly forty years ago and alternators are consumable items. Ya either ride until they fail or get in front of the problem but this time it looks about like usual.

    When I get a new-to-me HD whose history I don't know it gets a complete charging system, stator (because magnet glue lets go though they USUALLY don't get tossed into the stator with results you can imagine), rotor and regulator. I've used Cycle Electric since the 1980s.

    Another useful trick is I buy a complete engine gasket and seal set then use what I need and replace it. That way I always have gaskets and seals.

    To pull the alternator you'll need to remove the compensator and clutch. This is a good time to inspect the clutch plates and general area, and do replace the battery cables if you haven't already.

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by farmall View Post
    Shucks, I've I'd been online earlier it would have been triplicate posts.

    http://cycleelectricinc.com/Diagnosi...%20Battery.htm

    Remember 1982 was nearly forty years ago and alternators are consumable items. Ya either ride until they fail or get in front of the problem but this time it looks about like usual.

    When I get a new-to-me HD whose history I don't know it gets a complete charging system, stator (because magnet glue lets go though they USUALLY don't get tossed into the stator with results you can imagine), rotor and regulator. I've used Cycle Electric since the 1980s.

    Another useful trick is I buy a complete engine gasket and seal set then use what I need and replace it. That way I always have gaskets and seals.

    To pull the alternator you'll need to remove the compensator and clutch. This is a good time to inspect the clutch plates and general area, and do replace the battery cables if you haven't already.
    You are making it sound to easy to pull the stator,(alternator) there is a little more to it then just pulling the compensator and clutch.

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    There isn't MUCH more though, and it is easy work. Anyone attempting it should be using the FSM and parts catalog and not one post to do it, and they'll need to get used to stuff like inner primary pulls when replacing trans sprockets.

    HDs are a breeze to work on compared to other complex makes (and effortless compared to cars or trucks owners wrench all the time).

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