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  1. #1
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    Default Kick only 12v battery for horseshoe tank

    I’ve probably been through 2-3 batteries in the past year due to charging issues. I finally figured out my stator’s wire had been pinched in the case and the wire became exposed and shorting to case. Fixed that, put a new battery in and she’s been running great the past 5ish times I’ve ridden until now. My battery is fried again and now I’m wondering if I had enough juice in the first place.

    I had a oreillys agm super start 12v 5ah for my shovel kickstart. All I have is a running/brake light and a regular halogen headlight. Ignition is the electronic dynatech S system.

    I’m thinking maybe my batteries Ah isn’t high enough for the output of the headlight? Only thing that makes sense to me.
    Last edited by firstripholdmybeer; 08-04-2021 at 2:50 PM.

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    maybe something here:

    Thread: Smallest battery on cone shovelhead?

    http://www.chopcult.com/forum/showthread.php?t=49602

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    Back then I was recommending the UB1245 But now the UB1250 has pretty well replaced it. 5 extra amp hours can't hurt. They are 3.54" long 2.76" wide and 3.98" high, a friend carries a spare in his saddle bag but hasn't ever needed it. At less than $29.00 they are hard to beat.
    Dusty

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    Quote Originally Posted by DustyDave View Post
    Back then I was recommending the UB1245 But now the UB1250 has pretty well replaced it. 5 extra amp hours can't hurt. They are 3.54" long 2.76" wide and 3.98" high, a friend carries a spare in his saddle bag but hasn't ever needed it. At less than $29.00 they are hard to beat.
    Dusty
    I used a 12v small sealed battery used for spotlights when the power goes off (You see them in hallways) Cheap, small and will power what you have (Kick only) It used it n a rigid that had THOUSANDS of miles on it, in very hot/cold weather. I couldnt beleive how long it lasted (easily 6-7 years), and still did when I sold it. I got it at Battery Plus Sorry, Dont have the model number About 25 bucks, but that was a long time ago

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    Quote Originally Posted by docmel View Post
    I used a 12v small sealed battery used for spotlights when the power goes off (You see them in hallways) Cheap, small and will power what you have (Kick only) It used it n a rigid that had THOUSANDS of miles on it, in very hot/cold weather. I couldnt beleive how long it lasted (easily 6-7 years), and still did when I sold it. I got it at Battery Plus Sorry, Dont have the model number About 25 bucks, but that was a long time ago
    You can find them at a Home Depot or Loews in the lighting section by the emergency light display.
    Only problem is they use spade terminal tops.

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    The small 12V battery that I have used is the RTX7L-BS size, because it is available as an AGM style. And it fits the FX battery box as well. BUT, I don't get much life out of the brand I have tried (Parts Unltd).

    Jim

  7. #7

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    If you are frying batterys it could be that you have the wrong voltage regulator. You need a low amp regulator for small batteries.if you have a regulator that is used for electric start big batteries you will keep frying the small batteries

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    Quote Originally Posted by Whoremonger View Post
    If you are frying batterys it could be that you have the wrong voltage regulator. You need a low amp regulator for small batteries.if you have a regulator that is used for electric start big batteries you will keep frying the small batteries
    The low output regulators are not low Amp, they are low voltage. An alternator system will only supply the amps needed, up to its limit of output. Operating a battery system at lower voltage is what saves the batteries.

    Jim

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    Amps are a component of voltage. Lower amps = lower voltage and vice-versa

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    These are great, thanks for all the responses and help folks. I ended up being able to swap out my dead battery for for the same one at oreillys but I may just try to sell or get refunded in order to get one of what’s been suggested here. The headlight I have is a 60/55w bulb so I think that’s pretty standard and battery should be fine I would think.

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    About that regulator ...

    Just for shits & giggles why don't ya have a chat with Carl ..
    (937-884-7300)

    Last edited by Dragstews; 08-05-2021 at 3:43 PM.

  12. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by Whoremonger View Post
    Amps are a component of voltage. Lower amps = lower voltage and vice-versa
    Amps have a relationship with volts, they are not a component of voltage. Amps= Volts/ Resistance. See Ohm's Law

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    Quote Originally Posted by docmel View Post
    I used a 12v small sealed battery used for spotlights when the power goes off (You see them in hallways) Cheap, small and will power what you have (Kick only) It used it n a rigid that had THOUSANDS of miles on it, in very hot/cold weather. I couldnt beleive how long it lasted (easily 6-7 years), and still did when I sold it. I got it at Battery Plus Sorry, Dont have the model number About 25 bucks, but that was a long time ago
    That sounds like the ub1250 They come in UPS, alarms, emergency lights and etc
    Dusty

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    Quote Originally Posted by DustyDave View Post
    That sounds like the ub1250 They come in UPS, alarms, emergency lights and etc
    Dusty
    I use something similar, Used to buy them from a commercial trailer and equipment shop locally but prices kept climbing, so last few bought online. These are small 6v and 12v sealed batteries and not just emergency lighting in buildings or other uses, but commonly used in "Break away trailers" as well as road side construction barricades.
    Break away trailers are either commercial truck-trailers, or smaller trailers where a driver unhooks and hooks multiple trailers and leaves them with the hazards flashing. Or those construction barricades that have the flashing Yellow lights left out at night.

    The nice thing about them, is they dont sulfate over when discharged. They can get knocked into a ditch for a month, you charge them up and they function perfectly. Do that to your normal wet battery in your car or bike it wont work. I have one in a BSA from 10 years ago in storage, My nephew turned the key and the lights came on,, he was shocked. You DO have to be careful to not subject them to high voltage/amps, and they dont like excessive vibration. Being I use them on British bikes mostly,,, no worries about excessive overcharging. For vibration I wrap them in soft foam rubber.

    The only bad thing is they have small spade terminals so I use high quality spade terminals with dialectric grease and large dia copper wire so no voltage drop, make a short pig tail so you connect-disconnect the pig tail terminals, not on-off the battery.

    Ah is everything. Ampheres per Hour. The more the Better. I use the biggest I can fit in the space,, they come in all ranges from 2.5 to 12ah. On most British I generally use a 7ah to sometimes more if theres room. Basically this is a equation of how long it can hang,,,

    So, heres an example. On my 66 T120C it came with a ET ignition-charging system Junk! No Battery so riding it, the lights faded out to nothing at Idle,,, out in the hills where I live,, going down a steep curvy mtn road, You gotta keep revving it to see at night. (Deer, Elk, even Bear in the road) So, output of the charging system is 3 settings. Off-Dim-Flicker. At low RPMs, a typical 55/65W bulb can easily exceed the charging system, so the more Ah you have, the longer you have lights that are reasonably bright. Until that is,,, the revs increase then it all evens out. So Ah gives you a big cushion,, you are running off the battery and charging is not keeping up,, this can help you ALSO in avoiding being a hood ornament like I once was.

    *Honest Officer! I didnt see him!*

    Now, with modern LED lighting,, I know some guys who run total loss setups and run off a battery with no charging system. Racers and show bikes.. If you have minimal power consumption,, you can run all day without a charging system. But more importantly,,, lets say your charging system goes up in Smoke. If your ignition needs power, depending on consumption, You can disconnect your lighting and run home just on the battery. And again., the more Ah you have, the longer you can go.

    As well, when shopping for comparable batteries, CCA and Ah are 2 specs you want to look at. The more the better.

    As to Volts, thats like a creek-stream or river.. 12 volts might be the creek out back or the Missippi,, its about flow.

    Amps is like torque...low amperage wont turn over a starter, High amps will rip your nuts off.

    Ohms is about resistance. You can run 12v thru small gauge wires but it wont turn over a starter,, and Ohms is a measure for that.

    " George Ohm was a German physicist who studied the flow of charge through different resistors and was able to determine a mathematical relationship that we know today as Ohm's Law. Power - the rate at which energy is transformed, i.e. the change in energy per second. ..."

    Power in electronics is the rate of doing work. Resistance is the opposition offered against the flow of electrons. The relation between power and resistance is proportional.
    The relationship between voltage, current, and resistance is described by Ohm's law. This equation, i = v/r, tells us that the current, i, flowing through a circuit is directly proportional to the voltage, v, and inversely proportional to the resistance, r.

    https://study.com/academy/lesson/ohm...esistance.html

    (not just a good idea, Its actually a law!)

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