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  1. #1

    Join Date
    Apr 2014
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    7

    Default honda cb400 hardtail

    I've looked in the forums and googled with no results. I'm picking up a 1980 honda cb400 this weekend for a project with my son. My first build I want to build a stretched lowered hardtail "bobber" style bike. Seems everyone makes hardtail sections for cb650 and 750's but can't find anything for a 400. Does anyone know of a place to get hardtail section or can I use one made for the 650 or 750 thanks for any help

  2. #2
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    smaller Honda twins were a popular chop:

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    this 400 was built with a custom frame:
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    These guys say they can hardtail most makes and models, just send them your frame:
    https://www.thefactorymetalworks.com...ions/hardtails

    maybe just get a universal kit:

    Universal Weld-On Hardtail Frame Kit
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    http://www.tcbroschoppers.com/univer...dtail-kit.html


    2013 Thread: Cb400
    http://www.chopcult.com/forum/showthread.php?t=32677
    Last edited by TriNortchopz; 05-24-2020 at 12:47 AM. Reason: cb400

  3. #3
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    inspiration:

    Attachment 103725

    Attachment 103726

    Attachment 103727

  4. #4

    Join Date
    Apr 2014
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    Click image for larger version. 

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    Picked it up yesterday runs good and all the lights work. First step is to get it licensed then save up for parts. Handlebars have alot of play forward and back so its squirrely but should be easy enough to fix.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails 20200524_163250.jpg  

  5. #5
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    The stock frame is butt ugly and uses the motor as a stressed member. It does not lend itself well for a hardtail conversion and if you do one, it will still have the ugly front portion of the frame. If it was mine, I would think about cleaning it up and selling/trading it for a better candidate. A full custom frame is also an option. Notice the blue bike in the picture above. It has a custom frame. Johnnycakes' 450A also used a custom frame and it looks great. Do a search for CM450A and you will find a picture of his bike.

  6. #6

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    Apr 2014
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    I agree about the frame being ugly. I am leaning towards fixing it up some and selling it. I'm painting the tank and side cover next week. I work in a body shop and we're super slow right now and the boss is going to let me spray it for "practice" then I may try to sell it. Just yesterday a guy called me with what I think ia a yamaha xs400 that doesn't run for 250 with a title. Might be worth looking at

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by 555 View Post
    The stock frame is butt ugly and uses the motor as a stressed member. It does not lend itself well for a hardtail conversion and if you do one, it will still have the ugly front portion of the frame. If it was mine, I would think about cleaning it up and selling/trading it for a better candidate. A full custom frame is also an option. Notice the blue bike in the picture above. It has a custom frame. Johnnycakes' 450A also used a custom frame and it looks great. Do a search for CM450A and you will find a picture of his bike.

    No joke... it would look better with struts on it. This is my CB400 with struts on it and I think it looks pretty good for what it is.
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  8. #8
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    Click image for larger version. 

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    CM450A built a few years back
    Last edited by Jonnycakes; 05-28-2020 at 6:59 PM.

  9. #9
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    Make it sexy since you can get it painted, flip it, and repeat! With the economy in the shitter you could turn that into Evo Sportster money and you could have something worth keeping for a longer time yet an excellent starter bike. Entry level bikes that look good can sell to the many people who can't afford more money but want a nice starter bike. Rather high new and used prices for small bikes that run can work to your advantage.

    Flipping small bikes can be profitable because so many of them just need carb cleaning and minor work to run. Paint can make 'em quite attractive.

    When you have a set of sheet metal to shoot you can wait until a car or truck comes in with a color you like and shoot or get shot both at once for an even smaller investment and little or no need to buy paint. Your son can get in on all the work and learn even more. Teaching him the proper way to inspect used bikes is hugely beneficial! Very few kids learn that way.

    BTW I put a compression tester on every used bike I consider so you can instantly weed out those needing top end jobs (not worth it on cheap bikes) or drive the price down on something desirable. If you don't have a jump pack you can jump 'em off a (non-running!) car or truck. Since bike battery cables are small you can carry suitable cables or adapters. Normal bike battery bolt hole size is ~1/4".

    If you run into true junkers or organ donors for next to nothing, getting one for him to properly tear down with no intention to repair it is valuable training and prepares it for parting out on Ebay if there's anything worth selling. He might get in on that too. Learning early is awesome and good on you for teaching him!

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