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  1. #1

    Default Welder choice final two

    Hey guys I need an opinion on these two welder. One is a Mig hobart handler 140 and the other is a tig everlast POWERARC 161STH.

    It's my first welder. I'm going to be learning how to weld with this machine and work my way up to fabricating my own parts like oil tanks and battery boxes to handlebars and sissy bars.

    I understand they are two different styles of welding but if given the choice between the two machines which one would be the most versatile and able for me to grow into.

    Here are links of both their specs.
    https://www.everlastgenerators.com/p...SABEgJWZfD_BwE

    https://m.northerntool.com/shop/tool...SABEgLS3vD_BwE

  2. #2
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    If those are the only choices, I would have to pick the TIG with stick. Just way more versatile for a small shop, that does lots of different stuffand Everlast has reputation as the best of the Chinesey imports. Hobart isn't really Hobart anymore and a wire only is kinda limited.
    Dusty

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    Are you proficient in both TIG and mig? I’d opt for the TIG rig if so.

  4. #4

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    +1 for Everlast.

  5. #5

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    The Everlast has the option of using 240v and if it's used can deliver higher output amps. When I learned to weld I did it a little differently than most people; I worked in a factory where we TIG welded SS, incoloy and inconel and that's all I did for years. Later on I started stick welding and learned MIG last. I think stick welding was the hardest for me to get good at which was kinda weird since I was certified on SS and incoloy with the TIG at the time. The Everlast is more versatile and if you get it I'd recommend the foot pedal for the TIG welding, it makes a world of difference.

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    240 is vital. 120V welders are feeble and generally a waste of money. Get the TIG pedal.

    No contest, get the Everlast and PRACTICE on properly cleaned scrap. Even new steel is cheap, filler is cheap and argon is reasonable. Remember the machine doesn't supply the skill to use it but practice does.

    Visit weldingweb and the Miller forums. Ensure you can see clearly at working distance. Learn about "cheater" lenses. They save far more in supplies than they cost.

    Buy plenty of consumables. Waiting to buy a few at a time is not economical and like buying asswipe buy the sheet/

  7. #7

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    I am leaning more to the TIG. Does anyone have any other suggestions of TIG machines I should look into for 500 or less?

  8. #8

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    I've been running an AHP alphatig for about 3 years. Think I paid $700 and that's a crazy budget machine. If you're looking for a $500 tig welder, get the Everlast. Although it'll have its limitations. Pretty sure those are DC only so you're not doing aluminum. Not entirely sure of your needs for it. I've heard of some people tig welding aluminum on DC using helium but if you're looking for a good entry level Tig welder to practice on, you're in good shape. If you do decide to go with the tig welder I'm pretty sure they don't come with a foot pedal. Shoot me a message if you need a foot pedal, you're more than welcome to have the one that came with my tig machine. It's nothing special but will get you in some practice using one.
    Last edited by DRare; 04-14-2020 at 6:19 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Fxenewbie View Post
    I am leaning more to the TIG. Does anyone have any other suggestions of TIG machines I should look into for 500 or less?
    Check welding forums like Weldingweb. Their users have a wide variety of machines. Everlast has a sponsored forum so you can find out more about their gear.

  10. #10

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    I've looked at the alpha tig and read some reviews on it and it seems like the way to go over the everlast. It seems like more of a machine that I can grow into. I've read too many times about people buying machines and growing out of them only to buy the machine they deemed "too pricey".

    Anyone else have experience with this machine?

    Farmal I'll be hitting up weldingweb as well.

    https://ahpwelds.com/catalog/tig

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    100% go TIG.

    Do yourself a favor and buy something that you will grow into. Welding is addictive...as you get better, you'll only want to do more complicated shit and experiment with other materials.

    You will grow out of a 110 MIG machine quick. IMO, they are pretty useless aside from random odd jobs, sheet metal work, and tacking things. Mine has basically turned into the world's most expensive clamping tool. You won't be able to do anything structural with it, penetration won't be great, and the duty cycles are low. MIG really needs 220 to be useful. I wouldn't even weld up a set of bars with one.

    It's tempting to just buy a cheap machine to get started, but trust me...don't. Also, factor in the cost of a tank/gas, cart, helmet, consumables, etc. Those cheaper 110 MIGs will still cost you a good bit to setup after you add up all the extra shit you need to actually weld. It sucks sinking in all that $$$ into a setup, only to regret it in a few months when you find out how limiting it is. I did. It sucked.

    IMO, even MIGs in general (and this is highly debated/opinionated) are not the best for hobbyist welders like us. Great for a welding shop, because you can turn out lots of parts with good quality welds quickly. Not so great for someone who just wants to build shit at home, where efficiency isn't really much of a factor.

    Advantages of TIG:
    -Quickly, easily, and cheaply weld different materials. All you need is different filler rod, tungsten, and some settings to do so. You can only setup your MIG for one material at a time, and it's a colossal/expensive PITA to change over.
    -Get a watertight weld, which will lead to gas tanks, exhausts, etc.
    -Weld "more" with less amps, so even if you're stuck with 110, you can do more with it than you would with a MIG.
    -Plug a stick into it, and then you can pretty much weld 2 moving garbage trucks together in a hailstorm.
    -Many others, but I'll stop there. Yes, they are pretty, but that depends on the welder. A talented welder can make fluxcore beads look amazing.

    I just pulled the trigger on a new TIG machine myself for my home shop. I went with an Eastwood, they are local and I heard good things about this particular machine. Obviously not as good as a big-name brand, but for my purposes, it should be just fine. TIG 200 AC/DC: https://www.eastwood.com/tig200acdc.html

    Things I nailed in as a must have (that the eastwood all has) when I was shopping machines:
    -High-freq start/footpedal. Scratch start blows when you're learning. You'll blow through tungsten, and guaranteed you'll forget the torch is hot and accidentally start an arc from it sitting on a table and touching metal. Super annoying to have to keep turning the machine on/off. The footpedal is key.
    -AC/DC. To echo on the addicting thing, if you have a TIG...you'll eventually want to weld aluminum.
    -110/220, in case I need to take it somewhere or move it to an odd job with no access to 220.

    Grease from the Low life podcast has been doing some excellent write ups on TIG welding on his site too, this is a great one: https://www.ferrofabrication.com/pos...rst-tig-welder

  12. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by marianospeedcycle View Post
    100% go TIG.

    Do yourself a favor and buy something that you will grow into. Welding is addictive...as you get better, you'll only want to do more complicated shit and experiment with other materials.

    You will grow out of a 110 MIG machine quick. IMO, they are pretty useless aside from random odd jobs, sheet metal work, and tacking things. Mine has basically turned into the world's most expensive clamping tool. You won't be able to do anything structural with it, penetration won't be great, and the duty cycles are low. MIG really needs 220 to be useful. I wouldn't even weld up a set of bars with one.

    It's tempting to just buy a cheap machine to get started, but trust me...don't. Also, factor in the cost of a tank/gas, cart, helmet, consumables, etc. Those cheaper 110 MIGs will still cost you a good bit to setup after you add up all the extra shit you need to actually weld. It sucks sinking in all that $$$ into a setup, only to regret it in a few months when you find out how limiting it is. I did. It sucked.

    IMO, even MIGs in general (and this is highly debated/opinionated) are not the best for hobbyist welders like us. Great for a welding shop, because you can turn out lots of parts with good quality welds quickly. Not so great for someone who just wants to build shit at home, where efficiency isn't really much of a factor.

    Advantages of TIG:
    -Quickly, easily, and cheaply weld different materials. All you need is different filler rod, tungsten, and some settings to do so. You can only setup your MIG for one material at a time, and it's a colossal/expensive PITA to change over.
    -Get a watertight weld, which will lead to gas tanks, exhausts, etc.
    -Weld "more" with less amps, so even if you're stuck with 110, you can do more with it than you would with a MIG.
    -Plug a stick into it, and then you can pretty much weld 2 moving garbage trucks together in a hailstorm.
    -Many others, but I'll stop there. Yes, they are pretty, but that depends on the welder. A talented welder can make fluxcore beads look amazing.

    I just pulled the trigger on a new TIG machine myself for my home shop. I went with an Eastwood, they are local and I heard good things about this particular machine. Obviously not as good as a big-name brand, but for my purposes, it should be just fine. TIG 200 AC/DC: https://www.eastwood.com/tig200acdc.html

    Things I nailed in as a must have (that the eastwood all has) when I was shopping machines:
    -High-freq start/footpedal. Scratch start blows when you're learning. You'll blow through tungsten, and guaranteed you'll forget the torch is hot and accidentally start an arc from it sitting on a table and touching metal. Super annoying to have to keep turning the machine on/off. The footpedal is key.
    -AC/DC. To echo on the addicting thing, if you have a TIG...you'll eventually want to weld aluminum.
    -110/220, in case I need to take it somewhere or move it to an odd job with no access to 220.

    Grease from the Low life podcast has been doing some excellent write ups on TIG welding on his site too, this is a great one: https://www.ferrofabrication.com/pos...rst-tig-welder
    Thanks man, I read his blog post it led me to the alpha TIG. I think it's the way to go.

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    The key to all welding is practice and if you start on TIG and stay with it you'll have an advantage over people who become dependent on wire welders.

    Perform bend tests to see how you're doing. Bend tests don't lie. Examples with pics abound.

  14. #14

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    Looks like if you preorder the Alphatig 201xd on the AHP website that machine already comes with the SSC foot pedal for $690. You’re gonna want to definitely look into that route over that silver foot pedal that comes with most of them.

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    I'm interested in that Everlast 161 I have a Miller MIG but my budget for a TIG is less. I don't expect to weld aluminum. Can you run a pedal with it?

    I've heard a lot of good things about Primeweld. Was this unit one of your considerations?

    https://primeweld.com/products/tig20...ter-tig-welder
    Last edited by buzzkilr; 04-19-2020 at 5:02 PM.

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    https://weldingweb.com/vbb/forumdisp...ponsored-Forum

    WW is outstanding and covers all brands, processes and anything to do with welding.

    https://weldingweb.com/vbb/

  17. #17

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    My choice would be TIG with a stick if those were the only options. Everlast is the best Chinese import by far and is more versatile for small shops that do many different things. The city of Hobart has altered dramatically since Hobart was founded, and a wire is not a complete solution. Here is a Huge collection of 12 Best Everlast TIG Welders

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    I learned to weld in the Army and worked as a factory mechanic for some years after I got out. Then I stopped welding for 25 years. ( My big claim to fame from those days, I once got to weld up the tongue of Evil Knievel's trailer and he wanted to buy my '67 XLCH from me. THe one in my avatar pic. )

    After I retired I decided I wanted to be able to do my own welding again. First I bought a wire feed machine, ok for outdoors use, but it is a pretty blunt instrument. Next I bought a cheapy, eBay, TIG "multi-unit", it was less than worthless and almost convinced me that I didn't have the skill set needed.

    Finally I bought an Eastwood 200 AC/DC unit. I've been happily welding away since then. That cheap shit thing I bought, now it is a plasma cutter for however long that lasts, lol.
    Last edited by DoomBuggy; 10-14-2021 at 1:43 PM.

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    I know this is an old ass thread, but...
    A good MIG is handy as hell if you want to get welding quickly, "a caveman could do it". 220V is a must. I will say that if you need to do a small job outside, a 110V machine with flux wire is handy.

    But yeah, TIG is king and stick is versatile.

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    MIGs often produce nice-looking but cold welds in noob hands so like anything else destructive bend tests on sample scrap is wise.

    The usual solution is a stick/lift arc TIG and a MIG, followed by an oxy-acetylene outfit for torch bending, brazing, gas welding, heating stuck hardware for removal, washing off stuck nuts (on big stuff, not motorbikes) etc.

    Which order you buy in isn't critical so long as the process does what you need done. Stick works best outdoors followed by FCAW (which any MIG machine will do).

    If you do cars a decent 120V portable MIG is dandy for exhausts and some body work (the reason most autobody shops have one) but would never be my primary machine. (I prefer my Migmaster 250 for sheet metal using .025" wire but whatever you use, choose the correct wire for your material thickness.)

    OA will also do exhausts (and did 'em all before MIG was invented). Gas welding works great for thin stock (the reason jewelers use OA).

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