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  1. #1
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    Default Kickstand adventure

    OK I built a custom bike with 4.5 inches ground clearance.
    I had built 4 previous bikes in California and this amount of ground clearance worked.
    Now this new build was in Arizona and the curb heights required more clearance because in
    Tucson streets become flooded in rain storms.
    So on this new build it did work ok with 4.5 inches clearance except
    the kickstand design when welded to the bottom frame tube protruded below the bottom of the frame.
    Click image for larger version. 

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    The only design that was going to work was a kickstand that mounts above the bottom frame tube.
    Click image for larger version. 

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    First I had to remove the frame mounted kickstand that protruded below the frame rail.
    It was not easy but I got through it without messing up the frame tube.
    I welded a flat mount, 1/4" plate to the 1/8" frame tube.
    Click image for larger version. 

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    Removing the battery while welding is absolutely required!!
    Any gases coming from the battery can ignite an explosion.
    Those warning labels on batteries are there for a very good reason.

    Now I have full ground clearance under my frame.
    Click image for larger version. 

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    Last edited by Luky; 10-24-2019 at 11:49 AM.

  2. #2
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    Good job, I have a Paughco Sporty Chop frame I picked up as it had the right rake and lines I wanted, Its a roller right now with no motor but I knew buying it there was issues and likely WHY the prev owner sold it. It sits way too low. I need to play around with it to see what I can do to raise it up. A speed bump or dead possum would high center it.

    I might have to redo the rear axle plates but mockup and other parts on it will tell the tale, but I have heard on some its common. The world is NOT flat. Man, can you imagine if trucking along at speed and you caught that side stand tab? Would be ugly.

    (Also loading and unloading-truck or trailer a low bike is always interesting.)

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dougtheinternetannoyance123 View Post
    Good job, I have a Paughco Sporty Chop frame I picked up as it had the right rake and lines I wanted, Its a roller right now with no motor but I knew buying it there was issues and likely WHY the prev owner sold it. It sits way too low. I need to play around with it to see what I can do to raise it up. A speed bump or dead possum would high center it.

    I might have to redo the rear axle plates but mockup and other parts on it will tell the tale, but I have heard on some its common. The world is NOT flat. Man, can you imagine if trucking along at speed and you caught that side stand tab? Would be ugly.

    (Also loading and unloading-truck or trailer a low bike is always interesting.)
    Yes, I had trouble putting the bike on a trailer as well, and it was the
    kickstand protruding below the frame that was causing trouble.

    I was coming into a driveway that was slanted up and I was coming in on a angle in a left turn.
    The kickstand mount hit the edge of the driveway and kind of knocked me crooked. Very scary!!
    I had to fix this problem in case I ever wanted to sell the motorcycle I wanted to be completely safe.


    You can raise the bike with careful tire selection but it will only get you so much.
    Last edited by Luky; 10-24-2019 at 9:22 PM.

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    Good job Luky! Ground clearance issues get 'ridden around' by too many who should just fix it. It'll get ya one day when you least need it (emergency manoeuvre). That's a good criteria for what's right--'could I sell it like this?'

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    Functions properly AND it looks better IMO.
    I thought we disconnected batteries when welding so as to not screw up electrical parts.

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    Yes it looks good.......

    That bike is way to low for me........ It's a good thing you live in the flat lands...........

    The bike was trying to tell you it didn't want to get on the trailer but you weren't listening.... LOL

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    Quote Originally Posted by hillcat View Post
    Functions properly AND it looks better IMO.
    I thought we disconnected batteries when welding so as to not screw up electrical parts.
    Hillcat, I learned the hard way. I have always seen the warning stickers and did not really heed them.
    Then one day in my shop I was working on a build and just needed to grind a weld a small part on the bike.
    It was not near the battery. Next thing I knew I heard a loud POP! like a .22 cal , I looked around but did not see anything but I knew I had heard the POP. I kept looking around until I found the source. It was the brand new battery
    on the motorcycle. It had a crack in the side and was leaking acid! The battery had been over filled at the Honda dealer by some young kids. I did smell odors from the battery but did not do anything about it. Big mistake!
    I realized how lucky I was that acid did not get on me while I was working on the bike. It could have blown up and acid could have went everywhere! I removed the battery from the motorcycle and sat in on my drill press table.
    When I came back a few minutes later to take it to the battery recyclers the leaking acid had already leaked onto the drill press table and etched a hole in it! Damn!

    So now I am much more careful about grinder sparks around batteries!
    Last edited by Luky; 10-25-2019 at 10:26 AM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Hoghead View Post
    Good job Luky! Ground clearance issues get 'ridden around' by too many who should just fix it. It'll get ya one day when you least need it (emergency manoeuvre). That's a good criteria for what's right--'could I sell it like this?'
    You are so right Hoghead!

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    I like that kickstand two-bolt mount.

    Another option for bikes with enough room is the classic Harley sidestand which is easy to bolt to a plate drilled with three holes. That mount fits a variety of forward controls and while the stock position is about flush with the bottom frame tube it would be easy to weld one at any height desired.

    DTIA posted
    It sits way too low. I need to play around with it to see what I can do to raise it up.
    Axle plates plus a tall wheel/tire combo with whatever visual twists you feel to distract from the downward offset would work nicely. Curves and "lightening holes" break up the unattractive surface area of a larger plate needed for downward offset. If the lightening holes happen to be axle diameter (since rigids require no chain adjuster and a tasteful tensioner will do) you could experiment with different axle positions. If you make the plates much larger than required you can have more holes then remove any excess attractively with a cutting disk and contour with a flap disk. Other drilled parts (chamfer the holes so they don't look tacky) would complement the look. The axle plates could gently curve where they join the lower chain stays for a more vintage look.

    If you're extra motivated you could turn two simple eccentric axle adjusters and replace the axle plates with those with the axle at the six o'clock position. That trick would be different, simple to do with some round bar (or pipe with a recessed disk in the middle, nothing should look blocky) turned down to fit lightly bored short pipe sections, elegant and visually deceptive. Radiused edges everywhere there's an edge ensure a finished appearance.
    Last edited by farmall; 10-26-2019 at 7:58 PM.

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