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  1. #1
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    Default Xs650 bobber rear wheel question

    Aye chop cult,

    Quick question for you guys Iím running jump street custom zero hardtail on my xs650 with a Harley fatboy rear wheel with a disc brake

    Now Iím mocking everything up, everything is straight and ture. When I centre the wheel there isnít enough clearance on the sprocket side.

    BUT once I align the front and rear sprocket the rear wheel/tire is about 1/2Ē to the right. Am I missing something here ?? Or is it suppose to be like that ??

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  2. #2
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    When ya puts a different wheel in ya gotta align the center of the rim with the backbone and align the sprocket. Since the bike your wheel came off of had different distances ya gotta change something! I'm not looking at it so ya gotta decide, The things ya can change are how the rim is laced they seldom set center on the hub, to move the rim a little 1/4" or so you might get away with the same spokes that are already cut to length if not ya need to talk to Bucannon. You can make or buy a offset front or rear sprocket or both. and of course the spacers need to be the right length.
    Dusty

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    I’m running this wheel. Hmmm..

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    How much room between the tire and chain when the front and rear sprockets are in alignment (with wheel straight)?
    Is chain rubbing on tire?
    Since it is a solid rim, it can only move as an assembly.

    Get rear sprocket with the calculated offset, or a flat sprocket with the correctly calculated spacers, so the sprockets are aligned and the chain does not rub on the tire (just enough clearance between tire and chain). Like Dusty said ^^^, front offset sprockets are also available.
    That is gonna be the best you can get...centering of the solid wheel/tire in the middle of the frame is secondary consideration with this adaptation of a different manufacturer's wheel on a custom XS hardtail chop.

  5. #5

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    First and foremost your front and rear wheels need to be in alignment, then you can try to align the countershaft and rear wheel sprockets.

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    Lets simplify this.

    First. Get the rear wheel with tire centered in the frame. Do not let it move! Mark the frame.
    Tie a string around the steering head and run it back and over the center of the rear wheel.
    The string should run straight down the top tube of the frame and over the rear tire. Stand behind the bike and look at this.
    Make sure it all lines up.

    Step 2. Make a mark on the frame where the center of the rear wheel is. Try to get it right on the string line.
    The sprocket will be on the left side. Attach the rear sprocket to the wheel.
    Now take a aluminum angle iron and clamp it to the outside of the rear sprocket. Measure how far it is from touching the side of the FRONT sprocket.
    If it needs to move out you can get a spacer ,or make a space to get the rear sprocket to line up with the front sprocket.
    Remember DO NOT move the rear wheel from being centered in the frame.
    You may have to adjust the front sprocket alignment. IF there is any space between the frame and the sprocket make a spacer to fit.

    Step 3.
    Go to the brake side. install the brake disc on the wheel. Then put the caliper on the disc. Make sure it (caliper) does not hit anything and plan
    how the brake reaction arm will attach to the frame. After this is all complete measure how much space is between the brake disc
    and the frame. Make a spacer to fill in. You will never have to do this again.
    IT could take two days to do all this. Do not be in a big hurry.
    Click image for larger version. 

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    Make sure the front wheel is centered in the front forks!
    Last edited by Luky; 10-28-2019 at 10:25 AM.

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    It's all about the spacers baby!
    Sprocket spacers, axle spacers and caliper spacer.
    If your front and rear wheel aren't in exact alignment don't sweat it. It's more important that they are tracking straight.
    Luky's method seems sound.

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    If the sprocket is too close to the frame you might be able to get a dished rear sprocket for the rear wheel to get the chain closer to the wheel. That is if you have enough space between the rear wheel and the sprocket. A Harley dished sprocket drilled for that wheel you have.
    See Sprocket specialists.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Skjoll View Post
    First and foremost your front and rear wheels need to be in alignment, then you can try to align the countershaft and rear wheel sprockets.

    Absolutely correct! Skjoll is right!

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