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  1. #1
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    Default Cable brake/clutch leverage doubler.

    Not mine, but a nicely executed example. Of curse you need enough lever throw to work and and as little cable slack as possible:

    Note dual anchor points and locking hardware:
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Drum leverage doubler.jpg  

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    If'n you'r gonna anchor a cable under a flat washer on a screw I'd say at least two.
    Dusty

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    But it's just a single pulley...which just changes direction, it doesn't reduce the amount of force needed. Or am I missing something?

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    The pulley is connected to the load (the brake arm). The cable is connected to the fixed anchor and the brake lever, giving a a mechanical advantage of twice the applied force at the lever at the cost of doubling the length of cable pull. (That's incentive to remove all slack.)

    http://www.technologystudent.com/gears1/pulley8.htm

    Pulleys and rigging are fascinating stuff and can make up very complex systems like the rigging of a sailing ship. They are worth understanding when you need to move or lift heavy things. For example I placed my three forty foot shipping containers almost completely by hand winching including drawing two together to weld as a shop.

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    Quote Originally Posted by farmall View Post
    For example I placed my three forty foot shipping containers almost completely by hand winching including drawing two together to weld as a shop.
    I would love some more info on this. I might be in a similar situation here pretty soon.

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    Oho, that makes sense. I was thinking of a single, stationary pulley. The load being able to move, with the pulley, changes it. Huh.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Hatchet54 View Post
    I would love some more info on this. I might be in a similar situation here pretty soon.
    Explain your goal and I can tell ya ways to get it done. Containers are fucking wonderful because they are instant structure. Thier floors support the same machine tools shipped in them worldwide. If you weld you want one as they are easy to modify. (I have panel QDs through one wall so I don't have to open the end doors to drag cable outdoors.)
    Visit industrial and military container mod sites like Sea Box for inspiration.
    Learn container sizes and grades, and buy the best quality container you can manage.
    You want 40' High Cube containers for the extra height and internal cubic footage.

    I used winching because it was convenient to maneuver my containers past obstacles and underneath power lines. The HC size is about the weight of two half ton pickup trucks so less than it may appear. I could have rented a backhoe but I enjoy puzzles, would rather buy hard goods than ephemeral services, and developed a method of doing things slowly and steadily at low physical effort.

    Besides my containers I convinced the community college I worked for to get one (they have two now) for their welding program metal storage which they also integrated into an industrial facility mockup for training, convinced my now delighted hobby machinistbro to build an HC home machine shop, got another bro into them for storing hot rods and workspace (he's also considering using two HCs to replace his ancient doublewide trailer since he's disabled but quite skilled and they'd save him building a shell), and otherwise spread da container gospel.

    Your container will normally be delivered on a Landoll style travelling axle trailer. Have a couple of railroad ties handy and place one beneath the end, the driver will put the container end on the tie, drive out from under the container, and you can place the second tie. Landscape ties are cheap. I used them and for my dual container shop I used steel beams (collect all the heavy steel you can store) welded beneath the ends.

    To manually move the container I use sections of pipe and more railroad ties. Pipe rolls on ties. It's easy to pivot containers by moving one end at a time. Winch with whatever. I have electric winches but I mostly used my trucks as cable anchors away from the work, deadmanned off trees using snatch blocks, and hung my Wyeth-Scott pullers off the end of the winch cable. I used chain and hooks (I like tow truck J-hooks for many tasks) to grab the container corner fittings.

    Download this and save it for reading and reference. What can be done with rope can be done with cable, and if you like Amsteel and Dyneema synthetic rope are very light and much stronger than cable. Cable is cheap though.

    TM 3-34.86 (FM 5-125/3 October 1995)/MCRP 3-17.7J RIGGING TECHNIQUES, PROCEDURES, AND APPLICATIONS

    https://armypubs.army.mil/epubs/DR_p.../tm3_34x86.pdf

    I have Ramsey industrial electric winches and Wyeth-Scott hand winches but you don't really need a winch for many jobs if you use wire rope with clamped loops on the ends and appropriate hooks (I like chain grab hooks since I interface with chains. Slip hooks are shit. I replace them or add grab hooks on my gear. Loop one loop over your hitch ball, connect other to load and have fun. Snatch blocks and chains let you pivot off any dead man including other vehicles. Study off-road recovery and tow truck forums like towforce.net for some very cool techniques.

    https://www.towforce.net/forum/16-recovery-tech/
    Last edited by farmall; 10-24-2019 at 8:37 AM.

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