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  1. #1
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    Default Is it true what they say about Green choppers? (Cursed?)

    I hear old tales that Green bikes (and cars) are unlucky or even cursed. I dont know about that, But I knew a guy in the military they called Kermit and he rode a Green chopped Harley, Seemed bullet proof for a while, but in the end got a bad discharge and a string of bad luck.

    He was our hero for a while because while riding on base, the Base Commander, full bird Colonel pulled out in front of Kermit and nearly clobbered him, Kermit laid his precious chop down and came off the pavement threatening to kill the Colonel, Who mostly just took the abuse. They did dock Kermit's military license a few points despite the fact it was not his fault, but they did let him slide on insulting and threatening an officer.

    I know some guys who race a Green Jag road racer (Actually a pair of them) and British Racing Green aka BRG is very common but it seems they blow up and crash a lot. Maybe its just them.

    Jeff Smith was a world class MX racer and famously rode a Green Rickman with a BSA B50 in it and won some championships so cant be all unlucky, But when you are that talented you are just good, not lucky.
    A few years ago spotted a goofy barn find chopper (Triumph) for sale and, made fun of it a bit, inspired a wacky friend with a good imagination to write a inspiring story about it. At that time, I think the original bike was nick named "The Green Goblin" But when Atrav wrote it up he called it "The Green Dragon". I spotted another goofy bike in 2015 and sent pix to that group and he dusted his old story off and rewrote it, gave me permission to post it. Tonight, perused local CL and good lord in heaven! ANOTHER Green Chopper!

    Here is the ad, See: https://portland.craigslist.org/yam/...889468136.html

    " Classic Triumph Bonneville bike with extended front forks and custom paint. Bright green with real gold flake flames ingrained into paint. Comes with brand new in box exhaust and custom helmets. Rebuilt motor complete and runs! Shoot me an offer! Starting at $5500 but will entertain any offers!"

    And Ill post the pix below with the Green Goblin, and then 2 of the recent new Green Dragon,. (Not sure if the current seller appreciates it or not, GLWS but what the heck..)

    So here is Atravs story (enjoy)

    “Green Dragon” by Aron Travis, revised January, 2015

    That, is the '70's Dairy Queen chopper in a nutshell. Amusing, in a good way. Oh the poor disco hipster, no real mechanical ability, but firmly convinced that having a chopper will finally get Margaret the chubby waitress at the A&W to touch the bulge in his 28" waist jeans, and will erase his current nickname ‘Sir Gangly’ to be converted to a fresh virile nom de guerre like ‘F**k Hammer’. Bolt on the chopper seat with sissy bar, the fork extensions, "Round headlights are so square maaaaaaaaan.", and wiggle around one summer in maximum pose.

    It all ended when he scrapped the ear off of his 14 year old cousin during 1.3 seconds of wide open throttle in front of Donald's Burger House. Lisa the feathered haired foxy cousin paid with orange circus peanuts to ride on the back as some semblance of heterosexuality proof; a big wobble and slide through the intersection of Pine and Avenue D, Lisa crying while holding her bloody orange circus peanuts 'Now they're no good, they got road on them you dork!', concluding with a sound cuffing by Uncle Bob, “I said stay away from your cousin AND the A&W!”

    Little did he realize that this also foiled his destiny to become the first teenager to think Gluteus Maximus would be a great porn actor name as that thought vaporized when his cranium met the double yellow line, 'not born to be wild, anymore' as his memories melted like a double dipped cookie cone on the sun baked picnic table of adolescence.

    For years he was mocked as "Hey, isn't that the dick that wiped in front of Don's BH and almost killed some chick kid?"

    Forty three years later the humiliation has faded just enough that The Green Dragon will see the light of day, to be hawked on ebay for too much money as the guy finally saw on TV that all choppers are worth buckets of cash. "Hey mom, drag the Green Dragon out of the shed. No I'm not going to ride it!"

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    Last edited by Dougtheinternetannoyance123; 05-21-2019 at 1:07 AM.

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    I wonder how much of it is the fact that a lot of guys who started in the chopper world were vets who were tired of wearing green all day everyday.

    I've never had a green car/bike/girlfriend, not so much a conscious choice, just the way things worked out.

    I am superstitious enough that I have a gremlin bell on my scoot, and probably would not choose a green bike if offered an alternative.

    On the other hand anyone who needs to get rid of a green flathead, I would be willing to take it off your hands...

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    Wonder what the "Vagos Motorcycle Club" would have to say on this topic ... ??

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    i always heard it was related to the military bikes, or started with them(they were painted green). Guys saying to watch out for the green bikes because they had been beat to shit by the military.

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    If you believe in gremlin bells, don't paint your bike green. I'm not superstitious, so I don't let these myths rule my life. Life is too short to let chaos in.

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    Total & UTTER BOLLOCKS !!!,.... Quit smoking the Loco Weed and send ya ''Man Club Card'' back …….

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    Started riding in 67'. Never rode with a gremlin bell....just thought it was a new generation thing....wanted to buy a green flake Pan in the sixties, but my dad wouldn't let me spend the $450....BeeYOOTiful bike....

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dragstews View Post
    Wonder what the "Vagos Motorcycle Club" would have to say on this topic ... ??
    Iím sure it would be very insightful

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    For those who are in the dark ....

    The Vagos Motorcycle Club, also known as the Green Nation, is a one percenter motorcycle club formed in 1965 in San Bernardino, California.



    The club's insignia is Loki, the Norse god of mischief, riding a motorcycle. Members typically wear green.

    During World War II, many military service men rode motorcycles and grew attached to them.
    The outlaw motorcycle culture was formed after World War II along Route 66 in Southern California and many clubs were formed during those years, one of which was The Psychos.

    In 1965, a feud occurred among a few of the Psychos members; they left the group and created their own club, which is now known as Vagos MC. Their colors pay homage to their founders' Mexican heritage.
    The club expanded to the Riverside, California and the California high desert areas, and later to Mexico and Europe.

    The Vagos have approximately 4,000 members among 200 chapters located in the states of Arizona, California, Hawaii, Idaho, Illinois, Nevada, Oregon, Utah, Missouri, Several Canadian chapters Peterborough, Ontario, Chapters throughout Europe and ten chapters located in Mexico (Baja California, Jalisco and Mexico City).
    Two hundred members are in Inland Empire (California), where the club was started in the late 1960s.

    In 2013, the Vagos expanded to Sweden and Australia.
    Last edited by Dragstews; 05-21-2019 at 2:04 PM.

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    I've never seen anyone "lay down" a street bike. Overbrake, lose traction on the front wheel then crash? Certainly. For a while I offered use of my GS 750 to anyone in my MSF classes who mentioned they'd had to lay one down to see if they really could. No takers. I'd buy a good stunt rider or dirt biker being able to do it but it doesn't stop any faster.

    US military motorcycles were and mostly are green so that should be a positive as they outnumber all other green motorcycles by a very large margin.

    Jeff Smith was amazing especially since those unit BSA singles were pieces of shit in any color.

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    Quote Originally Posted by farmall View Post
    I've never seen anyone "lay down" a street bike. Overbrake, lose traction on the front wheel then crash? Certainly. For a while I offered use of my GS 750 to anyone in my MSF classes who mentioned they'd had to lay one down to see if they really could. No takers. I'd buy a good stunt rider or dirt biker being able to do it but it doesn't stop any faster.

    US military motorcycles were and mostly are green so that should be a positive as they outnumber all other green motorcycles by a very large margin.

    Jeff Smith was amazing especially since those unit BSA singles were pieces of shit in any color.
    Depends on what you mean on "laid down" I have a few... One was an over oiling event (was low and didnt realize it had wetsumped, added oil and off we went.) I was lucky as we were going to enter the interstate freeway. Stopped an intersection before the onramp, I was wondering why I wasnt moving, then suddenly bike took off like a rocket, Fish tailed and I stepped off.. The rear tire was oiled up.

    Second was wife used to have a CB750 we called "The growler" because of its pipes. I was test riding it before a run, and I couldnt make a corner, Kick stand came down and I couldnt get it back up,, It was either the guard rail or lay it down..

    Third was a customer bike, no kill switch and stuck throttle on a test ride. Rapidly accelerating and either lay it down or go off road into a rocky ditch and possibly a barn. I laid it down on purpose and then had to rebuild, paint and fix the bike. I am a little fanatical these days on a accessible kill switch on the bars as a result.

    As to Jeff Smith,, certainly is a talented rider. I was also on a race course with Dick Mann and again,, no comparison to mere mortals. I was aware he is a legend, But it cemented it watching him just glide around the track. Convinced me,, I will never ever be a good racer. At least I can admit it, but he was amazing to watch. (To be fair Dick wasnt riding a BSA, although he was a factory rider but at this point he was riding a Monark, which is a Swedish BSA Goldstar)

    I wanted to build my Rickman with the B50 500 unit motor, But the Rickman I have,, the motor is too tall. And thats a crime to cut up a Rickman. So I will settle for a nice Triumph 500 unit twin. I have a 72 Daytona motor with some tweaks,, Currently the bike is 3 colors, Red, Blue and rattle can black,, But I plan on British racing green. Hopefully mine will be as nice,,
    (Im going to run 2>1 side C pipes and different forks and hubs but essentially the same bike.

    Heres a sample....(Either a B50 or T100 both are 500cc and in this light of a chassis,, they are very potent bikes, I have rode others and most people wouldnt kick them out of bed for eating crackers)

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  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dragstews View Post
    For those who are in the dark ....

    The Vagos Motorcycle Club, also known as the Green Nation, is a one percenter motorcycle club formed in 1965 in San Bernardino, California.



    The club's insignia is Loki, the Norse god of mischief, riding a motorcycle. Members typically wear green.

    During World War II, many military service men rode motorcycles and grew attached to them.
    The outlaw motorcycle culture was formed after World War II along Route 66 in Southern California and many clubs were formed during those years, one of which was The Psychos.

    In 1965, a feud occurred among a few of the Psychos members; they left the group and created their own club, which is now known as Vagos MC. Their colors pay homage to their founders' Mexican heritage.
    The club expanded to the Riverside, California and the California high desert areas, and later to Mexico and Europe.

    The Vagos have approximately 4,000 members among 200 chapters located in the states of Arizona, California, Hawaii, Idaho, Illinois, Nevada, Oregon, Utah, Missouri, Several Canadian chapters Peterborough, Ontario, Chapters throughout Europe and ten chapters located in Mexico (Baja California, Jalisco and Mexico City).
    Two hundred members are in Inland Empire (California), where the club was started in the late 1960s.

    In 2013, the Vagos expanded to Sweden and Australia.
    I live in San Bernardino county, I would see these fellas wearing colors all the time, not so much anymore.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dragstews View Post
    Wonder what the "Vagos Motorcycle Club" would have to say on this topic ... ??

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    Ha-I remember the Iron Horse Green Bike photo shoot..... Have no belief in superstition tho.

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    Been riding 45 years, soldiered for 20 and here's what I was told by the guys I called old school:

    The military bikes of WW2 were made to fairly low standards, with clear weaknesses in quality of frames (good steel went to other purposes during the war), poor wiring and electrical, and numerous minor issues attendant on a design that allowed for the production of many units quickly. A serious enough difference from the better quality of bikes designed for a civilian populace. Now add to that the fact that most of these machines were run to death under wartime and combat conditions, i.e., tank trails, jungle roads, mud, did I mention MUD that got into everything. The bikes that were sold cheaply after the war were proven not to be the bargains they at first seemed to be. Cracked frames (!?), rings, bearings and seals worn from poor quality oil and mud/shit contamination and endless electrical/mechanical/rust issues. The hardcore riders of the postwar years wouldn't mess with the surplus military bikes, knowing them to be profoundly unreliable and therefore, unlucky. Indian and Harley had both been working on new designs in the waning days of the war, and like the auto industry, launched new models to much fanfare in '46.

    My dad rode (and served in WW2 and Korea), my grandpa, uncle and older brother rode and served as well. Aint making this shit up, didn't read it on Google. I rode, drank, wrenched and fucked with several generations of riders and I'm passin on what they taught me. Reckon I'm teachin you now......

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    Was unlucky for these poor SOB. (Remember that Friday is memorial day, remember those who served and those who didnt come back)

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    After the war (each one) there was a LOT of surplus and big lots for sale.

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    There is, sadly looted and damaged, A whole ship full of military BSAs and Matchless along with a locomotive on the bottom of the sea divers could go check out. Was not lucky for everyone on that ship. Story was pretty sad.

    See: https://www.scubadiving.com/history-...gorm-shipwreck

    " How a WWII steamship loaded with supplies for British troops was turned into an undersea time capsule — and one of the most-dived wrecks in the world.
    The SS Thistlegorm is often heralded as the most popular wreck in the world. Not surprising, given its well-preserved structure, wealth of WWII artifacts and the fact that it sits within recreational scuba diving limits. Learn how the ship — and its trove of trucks, tanks and trains — ended up on the bottom of the Red Sea for scuba divers to explore.

    Thistlegorm’s History Above the Water
    Thistlegorm was built by Joseph Thompson & Sons in Sunderland, England and was launched in June 1940. The 415-foot steamship was driven by a triple-expansion three-cylinder engine with 1,850 horsepower. The ship was owned and operated by the Albyn Line, part of the company’s so-called Thistle ships — all named after Scotland’s national flower. According to James Tunney’s article The Truth Behind the Icon in DIVER magazine, Thistlegorm’s name is Gaelic for “Blue Thistle.” When the ship was called into the war effort, a 4.7-inch anti-aircraft gun and a heavy caliber machine gun — both from the pre-WWII era — were added to the stern of the ship.

    Thistlegorm’s Final Voyage
    The fourth and final voyage of the Thistlegorm was a delivery of much-needed equipment to British soldiers in Northern Africa. The ship was loaded at its homeport in Glasgow in May 1941. Tunney says that the manifest stated that the ship was carrying only motor parts, but in reality, every inch of the ship was filled with equipment ranging from boots and rifles to motorcycles and locomotives.
    According to online shipwreck database Wrecksite, Thistlegorm departed on June 2 for Egypt under the command of Capt. William Ellis as part of a large convoy. Instead of journeying through the Mediterranean and risking destruction at the hands of German U-boats, the convoy took a longer route around Africa — a journey of more than 12,000 miles.
    Tunney says Thistlegorm was joined by the HMS Carlisle for additional protection after it stopped to refuel in Cape Town, South Africa. When the ships finally reached the Sinai Peninsula around the third week of September, they found that a collision had closed the entrance to the Suez Canal. The ships waited at a spot designated as Safe Anchorage F while the obstruction was cleared. Thistlegorm remained at anchor for two weeks with its engines off as it waited for its turn to leave. As it turned out, Thistlegorm would be waiting a long time — 76 years and counting.

    Sinking of the Thistlegorm
    At some point during the Thistlegorm’s journey to the Red Sea, German intelligence received reports of a large troop transport ship in the area — Tunney speculates that this was most likely the Queen Mary, which was carrying 1,200 troops to Africa. By the time the Luftwaffe had finally dispatched planes to bomb the transport vessel the night of October 5, 1941, Thistlegorm had already arrived at its final anchorage.

    Two German twin-engine Heinkel He111 bombers searched through the night but were unable to find their target. When they reached their turnaround point, the planes split up in hopes of finding another use for their payload on their way back to Crete. One plane spotted Safe Anchorage F and targeted the largest ship it saw — the Thistlegorm.
    The plane swooped in and dropped two bombs, which struck cargo hold four at approximately 1:30 am on October 6, 1941. The bombs’ impact was bolstered by the ammunition stored within the ship, resulting in an explosion strong enough to send the two Stanier 8F locomotives stored on deck flying through the air and rip the ship in half. According to Tunney, the explosion was so bright that it gave away the position of the Rosalie Moller to the other Luftwaffe plane, which returned to sink the ship two days later.
    Thistlegorm sank quickly and suffered nine casualties out of the 42 men aboard. Five of the men who died were Royal Navy personnel who were likely manning the guns on the stern, close to the impact site. The death toll would likely have been higher had it not been for the weather. Tunney says that it was an exceptionally warm night and many crew members had been sleeping on deck.
    The survivors were picked up by the Carlisle. Captain Ellis would later be awarded an Officer of the Most Excellent Order of the British Empire by King George VI for his actions, and crewmember Angus McLeay was awarded the George Medal and the Lloyds War Medal for Bravery at Sea after rescuing another crewmember from the burning ship.

    Scuba Diving the Thistlegorm
    Local Bedouin fishermen have been fishing off Thistlegorm almost since the ship sank off the west coast of the Sinai Peninsula in the Straits of Gubal, but its “discovery” is credited to the famous ocean explorer Jacque-Yves Cousteau, who documented his visit to the wreck with a film in 1955. It wasn’t until the ’90 s that the site became a popular wreck-diving destination.

    The wreck is broken into two pieces, with the stern twisted 90 degrees, lying on its port side at 105 feet. The bow is shallower and sits upright at about 52 feet. The 415-foot ship is packed with vehicles, munitions, weapons and other paraphernalia from WWII. The size of the ship and the richness of its contents means you’ll want to do multiple dives to fully appreciate all this site has to offer.
    The stern is where you’ll find the ship’s gigantic propeller, as well as the two anti-aircraft guns mounted on deck. The impact site and former cargo-hold-turned-debris-pile are where you’ll find Mark II Bren Carrier Tanks (overturned and tossed about like a child’s playthings), crates of munitions spilled across the rubble, rubber boots and other loose artifacts.
    Forward of Thistlegorm’s fatal wound are three intact cargo holds filled with grenades, mines, munitions, Morris cars, Bedford Trucks, BSA M20 and Norton 16H motorcycles, Enfield carbines, artillery, Bren guns, spare tank and aircraft parts, Wellington boots, hospital and radio equipment and so much more.
    On deck the sights include the captain’s cabin and bridge, the anchor winch and the tank and railway freight cars that had been intended to run behind two locomotives — which can now be seen on the seafloor off either side of the wreck.
    The vehicles and other artifacts are the main draw for scuba divers visiting this underwater museum, but you’ll also find marine life scattered throughout the wreck. Keep a look out for soldierfish and sweepers stationed in the holds, crocodilefish laying on the deck floor, patrolling trevally, schools of teira batfish, and hawksbill turtles.
    Thistlegorm is considered an advanced dive and scuba divers can expect strong currents. They can also expect crowds, because it is a very popular wreck. Diving with a liveaboard operator gives you the best chance to get in early and beat the day boats, which must travel four hours from Sharm el Sheikh.

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    That is NOT going to buff out!

    I will add that up to the late 1990s, You could still buy flat head military Harleys in the crates, as well as BSA and Triumph military bikes and parts here locally, Many of which came from Canada military surplus. I have a few box of parts and most a Military BSA. A friend bought a generator with a Triumph TRW flathead engine... Same Mil surplus. The Sandy bandit in Oregon had a shipping container of Mil surplus stuff like this. They show up at auctions, museums and shows.

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    Some of the RAF Bombers used these engines as well for aux power units inside the aircraft. Imagine trying to start one while loosing altitude over the English Channel. "Sir the bloody thing wont start!" Foiled by Lucas once again!
    Last edited by Dougtheinternetannoyance123; 05-22-2019 at 11:15 PM.

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