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  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tattooo View Post
    Why Thank you.... That's my kid I built it from parts,,,, I started with nothing.....
    Nice work!

  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tattooo View Post
    Hell man that's not that low, I've seen them way lower than that...... Try leaning the bike over push the lift under that side then tilt the bike back up and slide it up on the lift...... I've done it many times....
    That's what I have to do when my tire pressure is a little low.

  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by farmall View Post
    You can build whatever you want, for example fabbing steel ramps instead. If you want slick, fab slick. Steel ramps can use channel or angle to keep the tires on the ramps. You can build a zero "jack projection" setup by making a wood-framed box with a recess for the jack onto which you roll the motorcycle. Place a suitably thick, removable cover over the jack, roll bike into place, remove cover, lift motorcycle.

    A HF lift table is a lot cheaper than the header you plan on grinding off in return for appearance when parked. It lifts higher than those little jacks and is much more comfortable to work with. It there a reason you don't want the most effective solution?

    BTW variable height Softail suspensions exist so you could have low parked height and cornering clearance while riding. The automobile low rider world has some very interesting components if you want to roll your own.
    Thatís a great answer for a stupid Fukin question

  4. #24

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    Quote Originally Posted by oscarmeyer View Post
    That’s a great answer for a stupid Fukin question
    Hey bud, you just blow in with a chip on your shoulder? If you’re here to throw a bunch of foul language and insults around, you might as well just head on down the road. If you think someone’s request for opinions is a “stupid fuckin question”, keep it to yourself and move on to another thread that meets your standards.

  5. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by oscarmeyer View Post
    That’s a great answer for a stupid Fukin question
    Threads here are for many readers so quality answers matter. Nobody fell out da poosey with a wrench in their hand. I often post multiple solutions because different bikers have different situations and different supplies. Some of us have ample shops while others might have almost nothing to work with and live in an apartment. Some have money while others last hot meal might have been a blow job.

    -----

    I threw this jack together from scrap about thirty years ago. The idea is decades older than my copy. Looks like ass because I'd not learned to weld at the time but it's lifted a wide variety of motorcycles. The welds are to prevent the pipes unscrewing and aren't structural. The removable lever extension is an old fork tube with a hunk of scrap rod in the end but any similar pipe will do. It's thinner than a HF or Pitbull jack and easily fits beneath lowered bikes. I chock the wheel opposite the one I'm working on so the bike doesn't slide if bumped.

    Size height, width and lever arm length according to your bike and preference. The lifting lever is at an angle to the jack to offset it away from the motorcycle. Slide beneath bike and lift. I use mine one-handed and cover the front brake/hold the handlebar with the other. I could fab a pretty one but never cared to as this gets the job done.
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	old jack.JPG 
Views:	2 
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ID:	91963
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails old jack 2.JPG  
    Last edited by farmall; 03-13-2019 at 8:13 PM.

  6. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	old jack.JPG 
Views:	2 
Size:	133.4 KB 
ID:	91963

    Damn I have one just like that.... The only difference is my lift arm swivels.... You need to post that over on the cool tool thread.......

    I'll get some pics of mine tomorrow....

  7. #27
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    If yours swivels I might copy that since it's more compact and allows a full length arm.

  8. #28
    SamHain
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    Those are the whatever pipe I have laying around lifts I was referring to. Have one built out of some decent conduit, keeps the triumph happy. Have another built from basketball hoop parts that were left behind at a prior residence. 20 minutes and some scrap, easy as engine stands.

  9. #29

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    Quote Originally Posted by farmall View Post
    Threads here are for many readers so quality answers matter. Nobody fell out da poosey with a wrench in their hand. I often post multiple solutions because different bikers have different situations and different supplies. Some of us have ample shops while others might have almost nothing to work with and live in an apartment. Some have money while others last hot meal might have been a blow job.

    -----

    I threw this jack together from scrap about thirty years ago. The idea is decades older than my copy. Looks like ass because I'd not learned to weld at the time but it's lifted a wide variety of motorcycles. The welds are to prevent the pipes unscrewing and aren't structural. The removable lever extension is an old fork tube with a hunk of scrap rod in the end but any similar pipe will do. It's thinner than a HF or Pitbull jack and easily fits beneath lowered bikes. I chock the wheel opposite the one I'm working on so the bike doesn't slide if bumped.

    Size height, width and lever arm length according to your bike and preference. The lifting lever is at an angle to the jack to offset it away from the motorcycle. Slide beneath bike and lift. I use mine one-handed and cover the front brake/hold the handlebar with the other. I could fab a pretty one but never cared to as this gets the job done.
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	old jack.JPG 
Views:	2 
Size:	133.4 KB 
ID:	91963
    Good simple jack , its like the one that i mentioned with the block of wood another guy showed me but i like the all pipe construction better, seems less cumbersome, ill have to make one...

  10. #30
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    Hey farm I posted a pic of my manual lift in the cool tool thread.... LOL Hell I had forgot what mine even looked like.....

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