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  1. #1
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    Default lowbrow customs starter ignition, anyone?

    Got a couple novice questions regarding the lowbrow "weather sealed starter ignition." Im already simplifying my bikes harness and going to throw this turn key on. My question is, will I be able to transfer everything over from my stock ignition? Do the spark plug wires also connect to it easily? If so, I'm wondering if I will need longer spark wires if I'm mounting the ignition onto my primary cover.

    Thanks a bunch yall!

  2. #2
    SamHain
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    Your spark plug wires don’t connect to your ignition. I guess it would simplify your wiring if you know voodoo.

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    Quote Originally Posted by firstripholdmybeer View Post
    Got a couple novice questions regarding the lowbrow "weather sealed starter ignition." Im already simplifying my bikes harness and going to throw this turn key on. My question is, will I be able to transfer everything over from my stock ignition? Do the spark plug wires also connect to it easily? If so, I'm wondering if I will need longer spark wires if I'm mounting the ignition onto my primary cover.

    Thanks a bunch yall!
    What kind of bike do you have?? Do you own a Manual for your bike???? If so have you studied it?? If not you should...Your going to mount your ignition on your primary??? Where???

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  5. #5
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    Mentioning it's just a common ignition switch would have helped. Next time post a link to the part you are considering and use the full, correct name which in this case is "Lowbrow Customs Weatherproof Starter Ignition Key Switch".

    Precise communication helps us give you free assistance. Always post year, make and model in your first post. No one should have to view a profile to guess.

    https://www.lowbrowcustoms.com/lowbr...ey-switch.html

    OP needs to study ignition switch theory of operation. Know what even simple parts do lest ye be sad. I get about ten years out of cheap 20 buck Drag Specialties switches and clones so I wouldn't drop ~50 on a switch but to each their own.

    Study wiring threads, and the wiring schematic in your factory service manual including how the stock switch is wired.

    All you are doing is replacing an ignition switch. No change elsewhere required. Is yours defective? If so, how did you test it? They do wear out so if yours is old swapping can't hurt, but have a logical reason to replace parts.
    Last edited by farmall; 07-10-2018 at 11:03 AM.

  6. #6
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    As it happens, I'm in the middle of replacing the ignition switch on my '96 Sportster, and I have here a switch very much like the Lowbrow switch. (same manufacturer, one additional feature.)

    The easiest replacement switch is the stocker from Harley. The wires are soldered to the switch, and the replacement switch comes with a 6-8 inches of wire already attached, color coded just like the one in the bike. They give you butt connectors and heat-shrink insulators to go over the splices. plus a set of instructions. Other advantages are that if you go to the Harley dealership with ID and documentation that you own the bike, you can order a switch keyed exactly like the old one, in which case you'll have more spare keys. And if you manage to loose all the keys, you can go to any Harley dealership with the same documentation and special order new keys without having to replace the switch. This makes a little more sense on a bike where the key operates more than the ignition, like a fork lock too. It would keep you from having to replace the lock and the switch just for a lost key. The disadvantage is that it's expensive, more than the Lowbrow switch.

    The Lowbrow switch has 3 positions, off, on, and start, the last of which is spring loaded. Put in the stock location on the Sportster, you'd have on and off, unless you re-ran the starter button wire from the handlebar. You would also have to enlarge the opening in the starter switch housing. Don't get me wrong, The Lowbrow switch is a great switch especially if you're wiring a electric start bike from scratch. The lowbrow switch is a marine switch, from a boat, so it's waterproof. And it has a magneto circuit, so if you run a magneto, you can run the kill wire to the switch, and another terminal on the switch to ground, and you can shut off the magneto by turning the switch off. I have also read that you can get away with using this switch without relays, for the starting circuit. I've also seen wiring diagrams by users with the relay in the circuit, so I'm not sure on that one. My particular switch also has a "push to choke" feature. Push in on the key and it sets an electric choke. I plan to use this feature as my horn button.

    What I am doing is using the $20 Drag Specialties (or other aftermarket) switch that farmall mentioned above, because I already have one. Just cut the wires off the stock switch, strip and put on ring terminals and screw them sideways to the switch. You can use a test light to determine which wire is "hot" and use the hot wire to determine which other wire goes to the parking light, and which one goes to the ign and headlight. Because the switch is longer that the stock switch, I'll silicone a rubber disc cut from an inner tube to the back of the terminals to make sure it doesn't contact the frame.

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    More things to think about:

    An off-on-start switch doesn't end the lights on at start situation but does substitute for another starter switch/button elsewhere. It does occupy one hand off the handlebars so if you use it on the right side of a motorcycle you get to reach over to work the throttle with your left hand.

    If you put an off-on-start switch on the left side then be sure you never try to start with the motorcycle in gear or bystanders may be greatly amused while you try to cover the clutch.

    If you didn't block the end of your starter solenoid so you can't use a pushbutton cover, those require no other (but do not conflict with) switches or wiring, but are on the right hand side of the bike. Those covers are so handy they should have been stock and many people use them for their only e-start switch (sensible enough since the solenoid has to move either way).

    Do what pleases you.

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