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  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by afraziaaaa View Post
    I have my gas tank mounted the same way, but I used stock rubber isolators beneath it instead of leather washers. Gives a bit more cushion and lifts the tank up another 5/8" so I can run wiring under it. Might be something you'd like too. Nice work so far. I like the powder coat.
    Interesting. I drilled a couple holes along the backbone to run wiring internally, but I havent gotten into it yet. I was originally thinking of trying to do something like youre describing. Ill hit you up for sure if I end up going that route. Thanks, Ryan
    Last edited by ryanrowlett; 04-10-2018 at 5:12 PM.

  2. #22
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    Started reassembly. Spent all my lunch money on fasteners.


    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails IMG_3987.jpg   IMG_3988.jpg   IMG_3992.jpg  

  3. #23
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    Getting closer on the shaved lowers.

    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails IMG_4001.jpg   IMG_4002.jpg  

  4. #24
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    The lowers look decent for hand tools. Mother's mag and aluminum will give a nice polish if you don't have something already. What's that voltage regulator you've got on there?

  5. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by afraziaaaa View Post
    The lowers look decent for hand tools. Mother's mag and aluminum will give a nice polish if you don't have something already. What's that voltage regulator you've got on there?
    Thanks! I want a brushed look. The regulator is stock.

  6. #26
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    Piecing it together. About to get into the loom.



    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails IMG_4079.jpg   IMG_4080.jpg   IMG_4081.jpg  

  7. #27
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    Looks nice.

  8. #28

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    Looks great!
    I didn't do big modifications on my sportster, because i bought new. Was a mistake!
    Last edited by SARGENTO; 04-30-2018 at 7:09 AM.

  9. #29
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    great job , great look

  10. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by SportsterKurt View Post
    great job , great look
    Thank you, Kurt!

  11. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by SARGENTO View Post
    Looks great!
    I didn't do big modifications on my sportster, because i bought new. Was a mistake!
    Thank you! You should! Rubber mount Sporty chops are awesome.

  12. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by afraziaaaa View Post
    Looks nice.
    Thank you.

  13. #33
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    Reduced the stock loom to the essentials. It's all still a little loosely placed in there, but all the connections are made. It's currently turning over but not starting...

    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails IMG_4222.jpg   Screen Shot 2018-05-07 at 11.48.27 AM.jpg  
    Last edited by ryanrowlett; 05-07-2018 at 9:58 AM.

  14. #34
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    Threw some pullbacks on to get a more laid back riding position.

    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails IMG_4318.jpg   IMG_4314.jpg  

  15. #35
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    nice looking bike, but i always see these pics of bikes on the edge of highways and im thinking that shit looks so dangerous or what caused the break down haha.

  16. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by FatChibs View Post
    nice looking bike, but i always see these pics of bikes on the edge of highways and im thinking that shit looks so dangerous or what caused the break down haha.
    Unknown electrical issue. I think my stator or regulator is bad... something in the charging system.

  17. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by ryanrowlett View Post
    Unknown electrical issue. I think my stator or regulator is bad... something in the charging system.
    Have you tested it and figured out your charging problem yet? Do you have a manual?

    This may help - your Sporty is a 2001 right?

    Step by Step Instructions for Testing Your Harley’s Charging System
    1. Battery Test:The battery needs to be a fully charged battery that has been load tested to ensure proper readings. If you are not working with a fully charged and functional battery, all other voltage tests will be incorrect. Most places like Auto Zone, Advance Auto, and Pep Boys will charge and test motorcycle batteries for free. Standing battery Voltage should be 12.5-13.2 DCV.

    2. Charging System Voltage Test:
    Start motorcycle, Measure DC Volts across the battery terminals (you should have a reading of approximately 13.2-15 DC Volts).

    3. Check Connections/Wires:
    Inspect the regulator/stator plug, and check the battery terminals for connection/corrosion. If everything seems to be in order, move on to number 4 below to determine if there’s a failed component.

    4. Stator Checks/Rotor Check:
    Each of the following tests isolate the stator & Rotor, If AC Output test Fails and Resistance Check, and Stator IB Test Pass then Rotor is at fault (Pull Primary covers and inspect rotor for damage).

    AC Output Check:

    Unplug the regulator plug from the stator
    Start motorcycle and change Voltmeter to AC volts.
    Probe both stator wires with your meter leads.
    The motorcycle should be putting out approximately 18-20 ACV per 1,000 rpm. (Reading will vary depending on system, check service manual specification)
    Generic Specs:

    22 amp system produces about 19-26 VAC per 1,000 rpm
    32 amp system produces about 16-20 VAC per 1,000 rpm
    45 amp system produces about 19-26 VAC per 1,000 rpm

    Stator Resistance Check:

    Switch your multi meter to Ohm x 1 scale.
    Probe each stator wires with meter leads and check resistance on meter.
    Resistance should be in the range of 0.1-0.5 Ohms. (Reading will vary depending on system, check service manual for specification)
    Generic Specs:

    22 amp system produces about 0.2 to 0.4 ohms
    32 amp system produces about 0.1 to 0.2 ohms
    45 amp system produces about 0.1 to 0.2 ohms

    Stator IB test or Ground Check:

    Switch your multi meter to Ohm x 1 scale.
    Probe each stator wire with your positive lead on multi meter and the negative to ground.
    There should be no continuity to ground on either wire.
    If there is continuity to ground your stator is shorted to ground.

    5. Regulator Test:
    Each of the following tests isolates the regulator only, so if any of these tests fail, the regulator is at fault.

    Identifying Wires:

    Battery Charge Lead– Wire going from regulator to battery positive.
    AC output leads– Wires coming from the Stator to regulator.
    Ground– Wire from Regulator to ground or regulator may be grounded via the physical bolting to chassis.

    Regulator Ground Test:
    Insure the regulator body is grounded or grounding wire is fastened tight to a good ground (you should verify this by checking continuity from regulator body to chassis ground).

    Fwd/Reverse Bias Test/Diode Test:
    This check is testing the Diode function to ensure it is regulating the AC current for the stator into DC Current.

    Switch multi meter to Diode Scale.
    Place your Multi meter positive lead on each AC output wire.
    Place your multi meter negative lead on the battery Charge wire.
    The meter should read voltage typically around .5 volts.
    Next, switch your multi meter leads putting the negative lead on the AC output wires and the Positive lead on the Battery Charge Wire.
    The reading should be Infinite.
    With your meter on the same setting, place your multi meter positive lead on the regulator ground wire or to the regulator directly, and then place your meter negative lead on the AC output leads.
    The meter should read voltage typically around .5 volts.
    Next, switch your multi meter leads putting the negative lead on the regulator ground and the Positive lead on the AC output wires.
    The reading should be Infinite.
    Note: Below is a table to show the readings: (go to site to view table)

    http://blog.jpcycles.com/step-by-ste...arging-system/

    and,

    How to test a 2001 Harley Davidson Sportster Stator, from Soutbayriders

    https://www.southbayriders.com/forums/threads/59229/


    and,

    how to troubleshoot charging system on an evo sportster

    No pics, but here's a quick method of checking out your charging system...the Manual has more detailed tests, but some of them you gotta get crazy to do, so if your handy at all, this method should figure out your problem.

    Ya got 4 sections to your charging system, basically...Stator, Voltage Regulator, Wiring, and Battery...

    To continue, you MUST charge your battery fully, and its best to load-check it to ensure its ok....

    If your static battery voltage is below 12.4-12.6 volts or better (12.8 is considered a full charge)...its either not charged enough, or its shot....

    Start by checking voltage, both static and running...

    Mine is at 12.8 static, and usually 14.2 running (revved up). 12.5 running right now (hence the troubleshooting)

    If the running voltage is not higher than the static voltage, there is a problem...period....the regulator is SUSPECT...

    If the voltage is above 14 vdc or so, your regulator is fried, and it needs to be replaced...

    But wait...

    Go to the stator connector located at the bottom of the frame, RH side, front....disconnect it at the rubber connector...

    Connect your multimeter, set at resistance, to both leads of the stator connector (the side that goes into the primary)...if you read no resistance....the stator must be replaced...(should read .02-.04)

    Check resistance from each lead to ground...if either of those reads no resistance, the stator must be replaced...(same thing, should be .02-.04)

    Assuming the stator has checked out so far, start the bike and read VAC across the terminals...it should read about 18-21 volts per 1000 RPM's...

    If the VAC reading is outside of these parameters significantly, the stator must be replaced...typically, it will be lower if there is a problem...

    You have just troubleshooted the entire charging system, assuming all connections are clean and corrosion-free....This test is predicated on this assumption....

    If you've followed these instructions, you know the problem....if you DON'T know the problem yet, you either did something wrong (volts AC, volts DC), or you have corrosion or a short you didn't find yet....
    (borrowed most of this from the xl forum, figured i'd pass the info on)
    http://cheapskatecycles.blogspot.com...system-on.html

    and,
    if that wasn't enough to troubleshoot your charging system, here is a bit more:

    Diagnosing Harley Charging Problems
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	photo_05-e1457282581466-1024x640.jpg 
Views:	0 
Size:	167.2 KB 
ID:	84621
    Even though this sounds cliche, to be able to diagnose a charging problem you first need to understand how it works.
    There are three components in the charging system. The battery, voltage regulator/rectifier, and the stator.

    Harley’s use a permanent-magnet alternator to keep the battery fully charged. This is located inside the primary on the left side of your engine block. It consists of a stator (a group of field coils) mounted to the engine block and a rotor which is splined to the crankshaft. Magnets are fixed to the rotor and as the crank rotates, the magnets move over the coils producing AC current. As your RPM gets higher, so should your voltage.

    Before you can use this power to charge the battery, you first need to convert it to DC power using a rectifier. I will go into more detail about how this works in another article. To reduce space and cost, most motorcycles including Harley Davidson’s have incorporated them into the voltage regulator, which does exactly what you would think. It regulates how much voltage is being sent to the battery.
    How to diagnose Your charging system:...
    https://dgcustomcycle.com/tech/diagn...ging-problems/

  18. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by ryanrowlett View Post
    Unknown electrical issue. I think my stator or regulator is bad... something in the charging system.
    Before you dive into the rabbit hole check the electronic ignition with a hair dryer/heat gun to try and replicate it overheating--run a fan over the motor too while it's running to keep it from overheating. Sounds like that's your problem especially if it's intermittent.

  19. #39
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    Maybe check the coil?

    Quote Originally Posted by seaking View Post
    Before you dive into the rabbit hole check the electronic ignition with a hair dryer/heat gun to try and replicate it overheating--run a fan over the motor too while it's running to keep it from overheating. Sounds like that's your problem especially if it's intermittent.

  20. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by TriNortchopz View Post
    Have you tested it and figured out your charging problem yet? Do you have a manual?

    This may help - your Sporty is a 2001 right?

    Step by Step Instructions for Testing Your Harley’s Charging System
    1. Battery Test:The battery needs to be a fully charged battery that has been load tested to ensure proper readings. If you are not working with a fully charged and functional battery, all other voltage tests will be incorrect. Most places like Auto Zone, Advance Auto, and Pep Boys will charge and test motorcycle batteries for free. Standing battery Voltage should be 12.5-13.2 DCV.

    2. Charging System Voltage Test:
    Start motorcycle, Measure DC Volts across the battery terminals (you should have a reading of approximately 13.2-15 DC Volts).

    3. Check Connections/Wires:
    Inspect the regulator/stator plug, and check the battery terminals for connection/corrosion. If everything seems to be in order, move on to number 4 below to determine if there’s a failed component.

    4. Stator Checks/Rotor Check:
    Each of the following tests isolate the stator & Rotor, If AC Output test Fails and Resistance Check, and Stator IB Test Pass then Rotor is at fault (Pull Primary covers and inspect rotor for damage).

    AC Output Check:

    Unplug the regulator plug from the stator
    Start motorcycle and change Voltmeter to AC volts.
    Probe both stator wires with your meter leads.
    The motorcycle should be putting out approximately 18-20 ACV per 1,000 rpm. (Reading will vary depending on system, check service manual specification)
    Generic Specs:

    22 amp system produces about 19-26 VAC per 1,000 rpm
    32 amp system produces about 16-20 VAC per 1,000 rpm
    45 amp system produces about 19-26 VAC per 1,000 rpm

    Stator Resistance Check:

    Switch your multi meter to Ohm x 1 scale.
    Probe each stator wires with meter leads and check resistance on meter.
    Resistance should be in the range of 0.1-0.5 Ohms. (Reading will vary depending on system, check service manual for specification)
    Generic Specs:

    22 amp system produces about 0.2 to 0.4 ohms
    32 amp system produces about 0.1 to 0.2 ohms
    45 amp system produces about 0.1 to 0.2 ohms

    Stator IB test or Ground Check:

    Switch your multi meter to Ohm x 1 scale.
    Probe each stator wire with your positive lead on multi meter and the negative to ground.
    There should be no continuity to ground on either wire.
    If there is continuity to ground your stator is shorted to ground.

    5. Regulator Test:
    Each of the following tests isolates the regulator only, so if any of these tests fail, the regulator is at fault.

    Identifying Wires:

    Battery Charge Lead– Wire going from regulator to battery positive.
    AC output leads– Wires coming from the Stator to regulator.
    Ground– Wire from Regulator to ground or regulator may be grounded via the physical bolting to chassis.

    Regulator Ground Test:
    Insure the regulator body is grounded or grounding wire is fastened tight to a good ground (you should verify this by checking continuity from regulator body to chassis ground).

    Fwd/Reverse Bias Test/Diode Test:
    This check is testing the Diode function to ensure it is regulating the AC current for the stator into DC Current.

    Switch multi meter to Diode Scale.
    Place your Multi meter positive lead on each AC output wire.
    Place your multi meter negative lead on the battery Charge wire.
    The meter should read voltage typically around .5 volts.
    Next, switch your multi meter leads putting the negative lead on the AC output wires and the Positive lead on the Battery Charge Wire.
    The reading should be Infinite.
    With your meter on the same setting, place your multi meter positive lead on the regulator ground wire or to the regulator directly, and then place your meter negative lead on the AC output leads.
    The meter should read voltage typically around .5 volts.
    Next, switch your multi meter leads putting the negative lead on the regulator ground and the Positive lead on the AC output wires.
    The reading should be Infinite.
    Note: Below is a table to show the readings: (go to site to view table)

    http://blog.jpcycles.com/step-by-ste...arging-system/

    and,

    How to test a 2001 Harley Davidson Sportster Stator, from Soutbayriders

    https://www.southbayriders.com/forums/threads/59229/


    and,

    how to troubleshoot charging system on an evo sportster

    No pics, but here's a quick method of checking out your charging system...the Manual has more detailed tests, but some of them you gotta get crazy to do, so if your handy at all, this method should figure out your problem.

    Ya got 4 sections to your charging system, basically...Stator, Voltage Regulator, Wiring, and Battery...

    To continue, you MUST charge your battery fully, and its best to load-check it to ensure its ok....

    If your static battery voltage is below 12.4-12.6 volts or better (12.8 is considered a full charge)...its either not charged enough, or its shot....

    Start by checking voltage, both static and running...

    Mine is at 12.8 static, and usually 14.2 running (revved up). 12.5 running right now (hence the troubleshooting)

    If the running voltage is not higher than the static voltage, there is a problem...period....the regulator is SUSPECT...

    If the voltage is above 14 vdc or so, your regulator is fried, and it needs to be replaced...

    But wait...

    Go to the stator connector located at the bottom of the frame, RH side, front....disconnect it at the rubber connector...

    Connect your multimeter, set at resistance, to both leads of the stator connector (the side that goes into the primary)...if you read no resistance....the stator must be replaced...(should read .02-.04)

    Check resistance from each lead to ground...if either of those reads no resistance, the stator must be replaced...(same thing, should be .02-.04)

    Assuming the stator has checked out so far, start the bike and read VAC across the terminals...it should read about 18-21 volts per 1000 RPM's...

    If the VAC reading is outside of these parameters significantly, the stator must be replaced...typically, it will be lower if there is a problem...

    You have just troubleshooted the entire charging system, assuming all connections are clean and corrosion-free....This test is predicated on this assumption....

    If you've followed these instructions, you know the problem....if you DON'T know the problem yet, you either did something wrong (volts AC, volts DC), or you have corrosion or a short you didn't find yet....
    (borrowed most of this from the xl forum, figured i'd pass the info on)
    http://cheapskatecycles.blogspot.com...system-on.html

    and,
    if that wasn't enough to troubleshoot your charging system, here is a bit more:

    Diagnosing Harley Charging Problems
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	photo_05-e1457282581466-1024x640.jpg 
Views:	0 
Size:	167.2 KB 
ID:	84621
    Even though this sounds cliche, to be able to diagnose a charging problem you first need to understand how it works.
    There are three components in the charging system. The battery, voltage regulator/rectifier, and the stator.

    Harley’s use a permanent-magnet alternator to keep the battery fully charged. This is located inside the primary on the left side of your engine block. It consists of a stator (a group of field coils) mounted to the engine block and a rotor which is splined to the crankshaft. Magnets are fixed to the rotor and as the crank rotates, the magnets move over the coils producing AC current. As your RPM gets higher, so should your voltage.

    Before you can use this power to charge the battery, you first need to convert it to DC power using a rectifier. I will go into more detail about how this works in another article. To reduce space and cost, most motorcycles including Harley Davidson’s have incorporated them into the voltage regulator, which does exactly what you would think. It regulates how much voltage is being sent to the battery.
    How to diagnose Your charging system:...
    https://dgcustomcycle.com/tech/diagn...ging-problems/

    Thanks so much. Ill give these a try.

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