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  1. #1

    Default Flooded in Houston

    Hello everybody, I am looking for info about what to do with flooded motorcycles. I have a 1980 XLH 1000 sportster and an 03 883. I was evacuated out of my house and at this point can only assume my bikes are under water. So, the question is: when I get back what do I do to get them going again? Pull the plugs and drain the oil and primary and let it all dry, then put in new oil and plugs? Anyone dealt with a flooded bike before?

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    Sorry for the loss dude.

    I've not done bikes, but I have done flooded Jeeps and cars. Oil & gas, flush the trans and refill, now the one everyone misses, pull the wheels, get the water out of the axles and relube them. For wiring use a hairdryer and make sure you pull apart every connection, dry it and reconnect it ( a bit of waterproof, non-conductive grease is a good thing ).

    Depending on how far under and how long you may have to replace the seat, once they get soaked they never smell right.

    Take your time, I have repaired a lot of wiring where guys could not wait to try it and fried out major components.

    Good luck,
    -DB

  3. #3

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    I would not have thought to grease the wheels, thanks for that tip. And for the hair drier to the electronics. I think I would have been the over eager guy who fried my comoponents. Thanks for the tips!
    -Brad

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    Maaan I'm right there with you I'm in spring, I have been lucky so far and my bikes are still ok! Stay safe man

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    Thanks my dude. You too.

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    Everything listed above must be done ASAP. Salt water corrodes quickly. I've seen the damage done on bikes from hurricane sandy. I've also heard of people that have dealt with sunken boats say it is better to leave them submerged until you are ready to pull them out and go immediately to work. Once the air hits them damage begins. Salvageable , just a race against time.

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    Water Displacement 40 would come in super handy .....

    Buy it by the gallon ....



    In 1953, a fledgling company called Rocket Chemical Company and its staff of three set out to create a line of rust-prevention solvents and degreasers for use in the aerospace industry.

    Working in a small lab in San Diego, California, it took them 40 attempts to get the water displacing formula worked out. But they must have been really good, because the original secret formula for WD-40 -which stands for Water Displacement perfected on the 40th try—is still in use today.

    Convair, an aerospace contractor, first used WD-40 to protect the outer skin of the Atlas Missile from rust and corrosion. The product actually worked so well that several employees snuck some WD-40 cans out of the plant to use at home.



    Last edited by Dragstews; 08-29-2017 at 10:13 AM.

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    What do You guys recommend for cleaning up the rust, I just scored on this
    sweet knucklhead barn find, She's got a little bit of Patina showing.... What do You
    think???
    View post on imgur.com



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    Quote Originally Posted by Revelator View Post
    What do You guys recommend for cleaning up the rust, I just scored on this
    sweet knucklhead barn find, She's got a little bit of Patina showing.... What do You
    think???
    View post on imgur.com
    LOL First off you need to learn what you got which I doubt.... That's not a knuckle............

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    Spray a coat of clear on it and put it in the man cave, Sure to be a conversation starter

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    Quote Originally Posted by DoomBuggy View Post
    Spray a coat of clear on it and put it in the man cave, Sure to be a conversation starter

    Damn right...... Sounds like a plan to me.........

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    Visit boating forums to learn their techniques for unfucking flooded engines.

    I'd use a healthy compressor and blow everything out I could, including handlebars and anywhere else water could intrude.

    I'd pull the fuel tank and plugs immediately. Drain and refill your forks.

    WD is useful for cleaning but I'd likely get a couple gallons of CRC or Kroil and fill every engine cavity including the cylinders then let it sit overnight and drain. Then I would remove the primary covers for thorough drainage, inspection and ability to blow water out of the transmission. I'd try to bar the engines over with a socket on the engine sprocket with penetrant in the cylinders to ensure no moisture remains trapped by the piston rings.

    An enclosed trailer or any "box" which gets toasty warm on hot days would be my storage choice as I worked on them. I use hot truck cabs to dry out damp computer parts. It's an old trick.

    ( a bit of waterproof, non-conductive grease is a good thing ).
    Yes and do not forget the regulator connector. I'd disconnect everything and spooge heavily. You can use dielectric tune up grease (Permatex, any auto store) on threaded electrical connections too, and I just read of a wise Triumph Trident owner who packs his handlebar switches with it.

    https://www.amazon.com/Permatex-2205.../dp/B000AL8VD2

    Houston got rain which isn't salt or brackish. If it were salt water they'd be junk.

    A long reach blowgun is your friend.

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    Wish everyone in Huston and surrounding areas the best of luck, stay safe guys

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    Make money working the recovery, then escape. Don't relocate in a flood plain. They cannot be effectively defended against major storms, and frequency of so-called 500 year floods etc is increasing.

    Gulf Coast is guaranteed perpetual hammering. It won't get better so if you want to live there. get topo maps of the best locations then live with a longer commute if you have to. Houston cannot afford to fix its problems because its credit rating was problematic even before Harvey.

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