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  1. #21

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    Since I'm running an Antigravity 12 Cell lithium battery, it's quite a bit smaller than the stock one. I decided to resize the battery box instead of using the filler padding that came with the battery. Using the battery itself as a template, I drew around it with a silver sharpie. I knew I wanted to keep all three mounting points. Essentially, I would cut off the left side (saving the full back) and about an inch or so all the way across the front.Initially I thought I could keep the left side and just re weld it further to the right, but due to the way the left side mounting point is constructed this proved to be impossible and I had to cut a whole new piece.

    I had to cut a rectangular filler piece for the bottom after I squared up the remains of a round hole that was there and then cut a new front. I used 1/8" plate for this as it was a pretty close match in thickness to the stock materiel. Again, I used a angle grinder and cutoff disc to make the cuts. It looked like it would be a PITA to match the stock cutout in the side panel with the tools I have so I drilled go fast holes instead and I actually like them better.

    I just need to decide on a hold down mechanism of some kind. I keep going between painting it black or using some kind of "rubberized" coating. I'll probably end up painting it.

    2017-10-16_09-16-01 by David Arens, on Flickr

    GOPR0014 by David Arens, on Flickr

    2017-10-16_09-16-31 by David Arens, on Flickr

    IMAG2321 by David Arens, on Flickr

    GOPR0026 by David Arens, on Flickr

  2. #22
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    Just spotted this thread, and going to keep an eye on it. Looks good so far. One question I have is regarding the "m-unit." I am not familiar with this set up. What are the advantages? As soon as I saw the wire nuts on the old wiring, I figured it would be easier just to rewire it from scratch. Anytime I see wire nuts (or gobs of silicone as this one had) on a vehicle, I assume the previous owner either had to make some roadside fixes using Home Depot supplies, or just flat out had no idea what he was doing, and just scrap everything and start from scratch. Keep us posted, and more info about the m-unit would be appreciated.

  3. #23
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    The M units are being used on a lot of custom builds, IE, mutant Buells, Cafe racer BMWs and Sport bikes.. they are interesting setups and allow a very minimalistic style switchs. Some parts of it are super cool, but at the same time some of it is kinda out there.

    But in this case, the OP is only using part of their wiring setup and that to me is interesting how he is going to make it all work.
    Ive always wired up MCs original or slightly modified and a few relays thrown in, but nothing too exotic. But this should be interesting how he pulls it all off.

    See: https://motogadget.com/shop/en/m-switch.html

    If you look around, a lot of custom builders are using these. Theres a cool Buell build that I followed on another forum.
    Theres lots of builds using them,

    (One example See: http://www.badweatherbikers.com/buel...tml?1497902557 )

  4. #24

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    You have to unlearn a lot of what you know about 12v electrics to wrap your head around the MotoGadget M-Unit. If you think of a traditional 12v circuit as operating like a light switch in a room, think of an M-Unit as a keyboard on your computer. In a typical M-Unit circuit, a switch doesn't really carry any current. One side connects to an M-Unit Input and the other side connects to ground. When you hit the switch, the M-Unit reads that change as an input signal and performs whatever action you have programmed it to do. So hitting the horn button doesn't send 12v to the horn, it tells the M-Unit to send 12v to the horn.

    Like Dougtheinternetannoyance123 said, I'm using the stock controls which is kind of a PITA. Using the MotoGadget controls would have made this a lot easier. The trouble with the stock controls is that one side of the switch has to go to ground and they just aren't set up that way from the factory. I'm also not running any gauges or idiot lights which made things a little easier.

    Revival Cycles has some pretty good videos on it on Youtube.

    I created this diagram by reworking the stock one out of the '95 Factory Service manual. I scanned it and used "Gimp" image editor (free Photoshop knockoff from the web) to cut all the circuits into different layers and delete everything I wasn't using. I wasn't going to post it yet, because I haven't tested the start and charging circuits yet but I figure I'll throw it up with this disclaimer: THIS DIAGRAM IS A DRAFT COPY AND HAS NOT BEEN FULLY TESTED ON A RUNNING BIKE. I am posting it only to illustrate how M-Unit circuits work with stock controls and not as a blueprint for someone else's install. I have tested the horn, running light, brake light, indicators and headlight circuits and they work.

    Click image for larger version. 

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  5. #25

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    Progress is slow, but I recently sold the last of the chrome covers that came on the bike so that gave the project a much needed injection of funds. I've been collecting a few parts here and there and am waiting on a Biltwell Mako tail light to come in (Thanks Lowbrow Black Friday sale!)so once I get that and an ignition switch tab that should be in the same order I'll be back in business.

    In the meantime, I had to tweak the battery box in order to make a hold down I was happy with. I didn't want it to be overly complicated so ended up cutting the heads off a couple of 5/16 bolts and welding them upside down on the sides of the box. Then I used a piece of 1 inch by 1/4 bar as a hold down. Right now it's held on by wing nuts because I like the way it looks but I don't trust them and will be watching close should they decide to betray me.

    Unfortunately, in order to do it that way I had to trim the right side down even with the left. Which meant I had to take off one side of the top right mounting tab. If you compare the picture I already posted and this one you should be able to see what I mean. I think it'll be OK, it still mounts using all three original holes and the battery weighs a hell of a lot less than it used to.

    The other thing I'm working on is adding a coil mount and ignition switch mount to the stock top motor mount. I also had to relocate the choke mount. I know, that's a lot of mounts. I'm waiting on the ignition switch tab to finish that up. I had actually ordered a new top motor mount with coil and ignition mount from Gasbox but when it came and I compared it to the stock mount it just didn't seem as beefy. I'm sure it would have been perfectly adequate, but I was going to have to add the choke mount anyway and it wasn't much more work just to modify the original one. So I sent the Gasbox one back and put the $75 towards a set of Joker Machine fork mount front signals.

    So once I get the ignition switch tab welded up, I have a horn, front signals, ignition switch, and tail light ready to go. Still on the fence with using the original rear signals or waiting longer to save up for some nice LED units. Oh, I also installed a Speedo sensor block off from James Gaskets. It's a heavy duty plastic and comes with hardware for under $10. I canceled the metal one I had backordered at Lowbrow, it was $25 and some reviews said the plastic one sealed better anyway.

    IMAG2361 by David Arens, on Flickr

    IMAG2352 by David Arens, on Flickr

  6. #26
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    You're really resurrecting that monstrosity. Nice work. I like what you've got going on with the wiring and the mounts so far.

    I made my own speedo sensor delete with a pair of scissors...

  7. #27

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    Thanks! And how did you get those scissors to seal?

  8. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by industrialmarshmallow View Post
    Thanks! And how did you get those scissors to seal?
    Hahaha. I probably should have just spent the $10 instead of cutting the wires off.

  9. #29

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    Two months since my last update... I was visiting family out of town over the holidays and then, three weeks ago, I was checking my patio to see if it was icy. It was. The broken kneecap slowed me down for another week or so but by far the thing slowing me down the most is routing this wiring harness. I've had to redo several connections because I cut them too short or decided to reroute after I had already terminated it, or like the coil leads, I did them the first time with ring terminals that were a little too large because that's what I had on hand and it just kept bugging me until I redid them with the right size. I've also had to research different types of loom until I found something I think will work, plus saved enough change to buy misc stuff like the loom, loom tape, bullet connectors, shrink/adhesive ring terminals, more double wall adhesive shrink tubing, clear shrink tubing, 40amp circuit breaker etc... etc... Whcih all adds up after a while.

    Anyway, I can see the taillight at the end of the wiring tunnel. I have some work to do on the connections from the main circuit breaker, and I haven't touched the taillight and rear turn signals yet, especially since I'm not sure if I'm keeping the stock signals or not and still I have to strip and trim the rear fender. Oh, and then loom everything. But assuming ( I know) that everything works, that's about it for wiring.

    IMAG2422 by David Arens, on Flickr

    While I'm here, I'll just mention some of the methods I've used to make connections. I've re-used some of the stock Deutsch connectors in places. When using those, I've crimped and soldered the little pins. I've used crimp and shrink ring terminals and I will usually use black shrink tube over that for added protection. Also, I think it gives the connection a good clean look. For most connections I'll use the double wall adhesive stuff.

    For the horn, I used plastic covered crimp on female blade connectors with shrink tube added over the crimp part. I soldered some connections (like led turn signals) because the wires were so small I wasn't sure a butt connector would work when connecting to the 14/16 ga wire in the harness. When I did those I twisted and soldered the wires, then shrunk a piece of small diameter shrink tubing over the connection, then over that, a larger piece of adhesive shrink tubing. I'm hoping that gives the connection enough strain relief that vibration won't bother it. I've read that solder connections can be too brittle for bikes. I guess I'll find out.

    Another place I soldered connections was where I had to join a wire to the middle of another wire. I stripped an inch or so of the wire by using a typical wire stripper to ring the insulation at both ends of the inch, then a razor knife to cut and peel it off exposing the copper. Then it was twist, solder and shrink as above.
    IMAG2380 by David Arens, on Flickr

    IMAG2381 by David Arens, on Flickr

    IMAG2383 by David Arens, on Flickr


    As far as real work, I got the key switch tab welded on the motor mount and I'm happy with it. It's still just tacked in the picture, and I ended up cutting a little off the bottom to shorten it some before I fully welded it.

    IMAG2373 by David Arens, on Flickr

  10. #30

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    Over this past weekend I was able to do a bunch of little stuff that needed doing. I have pretty much all of the inputs and outputs connected to the M-unit except one. At this point they aren't trimmed to the final length, I'm going to wait to do that until I test everything and am doing the looming.

    I needed to wire up the tail light, but before I could do that I had to figure out placement and before I could do THAT, I had to cut the fender. I lot of the cut fenders I looked at seemed to be cut at 45deg or so and I was all set to do it that way. But after messing around with tape and cardboard for a while I decided to go with a more subtle trim. I like the way it looks, it's different than most of the cut fenders I see, and if I decide to cut more in the future I can. I'm also keeping full struts. For now anyway...

    That allowed me to mock up the Biltwell Mako tailight, which I decided looked good pushed rearwards just slightly past where the lens would be vertical.

    I still need to strip the paint off the fender, weld up some holes and make some new ones. I'm planning on a bare metal finish and I'm wondering if the black Mako will look like a big ass wart on the bare metal fender. I guess we'll see. I can always strip that too.

    The next thing is turn signals. I kept going back and forth with running the stock ones, but I've decided to go with some LEDS. A quality set will add time and money, but I won't hate looking at them.

    IMAG2438 by David Arens, on Flickr

    IMAG2437 by David Arens, on Flickr

    IMAG2440 by David Arens, on Flickr

  11. #31
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    I like it. Clean and practical.

  12. #32

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    So once I got the mounting plate together and I started playing with how all the components were configured, I made a few changes. Initially, I was going to run the ignition module connection above the plate so it kept the area above the battery clean. I was going to run the circuit breaker below the plate, above the battery. Just for giggles, I tried the circuit breaker on top of the plate. It looked like it would work, I could even use the two holes I had already drilled for the mounting screws. Of course, once I actually mocked it up, it was just a little too tight for my liking. Unfortunately, I liked the idea of running it on top and decided to keep it. This meant I had to remake one of the wires from the CB to the IGN switch as well as drill and tap new mounting holes for the M-Unit so I could scoot it over a half inch. I ended up having to drill new holes to mount the CB as well because it fit better on an angle. I welded up all the old holes and drilled yet another new one for the wires from the rear turn signals and brake/tail light to come up through from the bottom.

    It was all kind of a PITA to shuffle everything, (especially because the first set of new holes I drilled for the M-Unit were off by 1/16th which was just enough that it wouldn't fit and I had to weld them up and do it again) but once I decided I liked it that way better, it would have bugged me forever if I left it like it was.

    I think there are a couple things I have left to do to the mounting plate. I want to enlarge the opening at the front where the harness enters so it isn't as tight. I want to increase the size of the hole for the rear fender wiring to enter because it'll be easier to pull the bullet connectors through a slightly larger grommet. Current ID of the grommet is 1/4" and I'm not sure a bullet connector + the other wires would fit through.

    After that it's primer and paint. Unless I have to change something else...

    IMAG2143 by David Arens, on Flickr

    2017-10-16_09-32-41 by David Arens, on Flickr

    2017-10-16_09-33-00 by David Arens, on Flickr

    IMAG2438 by David Arens, on Flickr

    IMAG2459 by David Arens, on Flickr

    IMAG2465 by David Arens, on Flickr

    IMAG2470 by David Arens, on Flickr

    IMAG2505 by David Arens, on Flickr

  13. #33

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    As you can see from the pics in the last post, I have everything loomed up. I used a plastic mesh split loom, special "loom tape", and zip ties.

    The loom I'm happy with so far, we'll see how it stands up over the long run. It was easy to work with and cut pretty well using a knife heated red hot with a small butane torch to melt the cut so it wouldn't fray/unravel.

    The tape is shit. The adhesive didn't seem real strong as I was wrapping it and sure enough, the ends came unstuck by the day after I used it. This is in temps from the 20's to the 40's or so. I can imagine it'd be dripping off in the summer. I really only used it to dress the open ends of the loom and to cover/seal the main junction of 3 looms in the seatpost area. That's where I need to find another solution, I really need something there to cover that joint. I can get away with using large shrink tube to cover the open ends. I got this tape from amazon and it wasn't cheap, I'll try a different brand, 3M or something decent and see how that goes.

    I printed wire labels off in a tiny font and then slipped the little pieces of paper under sections of 1/8" clear shrink. I'm deep in it now, but in 6mo I'm not going to remember what the blue wire goes to... especially if I don't have my schematic handy.

    Crap tape: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...?ie=UTF8&psc=1

    Loom:
    https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...?ie=UTF8&psc=1

    More loom:
    https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...?ie=UTF8&psc=1

    IMAG2467 by David Arens, on Flickr

  14. #34
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    Looks like it’s coming along great! I had to redo the wiring on my ‘99 when I bought it, and I ditched everything except the bare necessities, still had to spend many hours going cross-eyed over the wiring diagram.

  15. #35

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    Thanks Man. It's slow but I'm making progress. If only I had more time and money... I'm old so I kept a magnifying glass next to the schematic in the service manual until I got sick of that and scanned it. Now (See post #29) I just zoom in on it!

  16. #36

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    Quote Originally Posted by farmall View Post
    I like it. Clean and practical.
    I missed this... Thanks.

  17. #37

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    Following....good job cleaning her up. Considering a m-unit for my next bike build as well as a project car

  18. #38

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    I wanted to run signals but wanted to keep them as invisible as possible until I hit the button. I decided to use Motogadget m-blaze pins for the rear. They are tiny, but bright.

    They are so small in fact that if I mounted them in the middle hole on my fender strut where I was originally going to, the boss and bolthead of the rear fender mounting bolt stuck out almost as far as the light. Realistically, I don't thing it would have made a huge difference in the amount of light sent rearwards, but I didn't like it.

    If I moved the fender mounting bolt to the middle hole and tried to mount the light on the rear boss, the hollow through bolt on the light wasn't long enough to put any thread on the inside of the fender and the nut wouldn't start.

    I could either weld an extension on the strut or cut off the boss. I couldn't see any advantage to welding an extension so I just cut the boss off.

    IMAG2472 by David Arens, on Flickr

    IMAG2486 by David Arens, on Flickr

    IMAG2491 by David Arens, on Flickr

    IMAG2492 by David Arens, on Flickr

    IMAG2493 by David Arens, on Flickr

    I'm still tweaking routing the wiring so I'll save that for another post.

    I did throw some rattlecan gloss black on the top motor/ign switch/choke/coil mount, battery box, electronics mounting plate and a license plate bracket I crudely hacked together today. (Yeah, I know you can get one from Biltwell for 15 bucks, but I had the steel on hand)

    20180325_125651 by David Arens, on Flickr

    20180325_170743 by David Arens, on Flickr

    20180325_154525 by David Arens, on Flickr

    20180325_193528 by David Arens, on Flickr

    20180325_105147 by David Arens, on Flickr

  19. #39

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    Quote Originally Posted by BlackHornet View Post
    Following....good job cleaning her up. Considering a m-unit for my next bike build as well as a project car
    Thanks Man, I appreciate it. I really like the simplicity of it, especially if used with Motogadget controls. I'm not sure I'd use it again though ONLY because for the money I spent, I'm not going to be utilizing a quarter of the functionality of this thing. I would, however, look real hard at the one without the blue tooth.

  20. #40

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    ya, thats why im not using it on my current tracker build. I have a sportster in pieces right now and i wouldnt be surprised if the harness is a chewed up rats nest and so instead of spending the money on replacing the harness, I could put it towards the m-unit.....all up in the air though until i tear into that bike.

    in the mean time, keep on keepin on. also, im looking for a tank with a right side petcock.....wink wink

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