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  1. #1
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    Default Yet another hardtail evo sporty... long story, lots of pics.

    I bought this bike with a lot of work already done to it for a fair price.

    It looks like this:



    Haifley "hipster in a box" hardtail rear end.


    Before driving 500 miles to pick it up I spoke with the seller multiple times on the phone. I asked him to tell me anything wrong with the bike. He said there were a couple minor chips in the paint, one small "ding" from assembly and the one grip was worn out.

    When I arrived, suddenly there were new things wrong that he "forgot to tell me".

    - No fork stops. Coincidentally the spot where the bars contact the tank is in the same spot as the ding from "assembly"
    - Leaks a little bit of oil because "I never put that white tape on the fittings. It only leaks a little bit."

    Ok, whatever. I wasn't in a spot to haggle or negotiate over these things after driving 500 miles, and these were things I could fix in a few hours. It was a torrential downpour outside, I couldn't drive the bike and was only able to runit for a second in dude's garage.

    Got it home, park it in my garage, it's winter. I come down 2 days later and nearly the entire oil bag has dumped it's contents on the floor of the garage. I check the fittings on the oil bag, they're not even tight... suspicious. I clean everything off, put pipe dope on the threads and reassemble and refill with oil. Check a few hours later and there's a huge puddle under the bike. Upon close inspection: oil tank has a monster crack in it.

    Beveled it out, welded it up:



    My speculation? The guy who was selling it knew it was cracked, loosened up the fittings to make it appear to be the problem and listed it for sale. I started sniffing for other things.

    The wiring was completely smoked. There were spots where the wires had burned away all the insulation. I should have seen it on pre-purchase inspection, but the PO must have known about it. There was tape over some parts of the burned away insulation. There were no fuses anywhere in the system and the wiring was all held together with butt connectors.

    The sprocket cover had been shattered at some point and very poorly welded back together.

    The taillight was held on with a zip tie.

    I fixed the taillight mount and rewired everything. Added some fuses and breakers.







    Took it for an inaugural ride. The brake doesn't work for shit. You can stand on the pedal and it will slow down but not lock up the tire. Part of this was because the brake pads were so loaded with engine oil from the PO riding it around with a crack in the oil tank. Part of it is a bad master cylinder.

    Well, the inaugural ride ended poorly because the bike wouldn't start again once I parked it at a restaurant. Battery was dead.

    Got it home in a truck. Found that the charging system wire was showing continuity to ground. Pulled it apart to find:



    Fuck.

    Whole new charging system was in order. Maybe could have retained the regulator, but I replaced it anyway with a whole new setup from cycle electric:



    While I was in there I put a new starter in it as well. However, since I don't exactly trust electric starters, I also ordered a ledsled kicker conversion. I didn't want to buy one of the vtwin knockoff ones because I'm not an asshole.

    Installing this kicker kit requires pulling the transmission and replacing the mainshaft:





    Got it all buttoned back up:



    When I pulled the end seal out of the main drive gear, i found that the outboard needle bearings had exploded, so I replaced those. The reason they exploded? The previous owner didn't tighten the sprocket nut for the chain conversion enough and ran it loose for god knows how long (you could see it was tightened with a wrench or pliers).

    I replaced the needle bearings and the quad ring and the MDG oil seal while I was in there.

    Onto the ledsled kicker. Nice piece, though it doesn't come with provisions to run mid controls or mount a master cylinder. Never to fear...

    Added a hole for the peg (counterbored on the backside). However, you can see there isn't a lot of material left around the hole after putting a deep cbore in...



    Made some pieces:



    Welded 'em. I'm not a guy who makes a lot of excuses but the welder I was welding this with is a 40 year old synchowave with the most unstable arc I've ever used. Also, the pedal is broken and never breaks the arc completely, so you have to start with the torch far from the part and then just let the arc jump. It's a nightmare.



    Made a pedal pad:



    Made a pedal (more bad welds):



    The pedal pad fits on nicely though:



    I love these "pull type" masters:



    Loosely mocked everything up and that gets you to where we are right now:




  2. #2
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    Bummer on the hoodwinking but I'm liking where this is headed. Keep it coming.

  3. #3
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    very awesome, i'll be checking this when i pull the trigger on the kicker...isn't it awesome having access to CNC? ha

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by birthcontrol View Post
    very awesome, i'll be checking this when i pull the trigger on the kicker...isn't it awesome having access to CNC? ha
    Man I WISH i had a CNC. Everything I do is on a 40 year old bridgeport and a 35 year old lathe! Turnin' knobs, baby.

    Most of the parts are just hand shaped on a belt sander/bandsaw.

  5. #5
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    Old Miller pedals are easy to fix and parts are reasonable. There is very little inside the pedal, mostly a wire-wound resistor, a wiper brush and that switch. You can freshen up a Miller pedal very easily and may be much happier with your Synchrowave if you do. Open that bitch up and you'll see how simple they are.

    Here's a generic pic. Many models use the same case and vary by wires and resistor. You can convert them between types if you ever get a machine without a pedal:

    http://www.millerwelds.com/resources...etch?id=516713

    You can download a manual from Miller for free: https://www.millerwelds.com/support/manuals-and-parts and their forums are outstanding. Lots of expertise there on older Miller repairs and some members do cool shit like overhaul feeders, recap power sources and more: http://www.millerwelds.com/resources/communities/mboard

    Determine the pedal model by your welder manual then download the pedal manual.


    The manual has pedal test procedures so you won't just play swaptronics. cruizer and 7A739 on the forums are especially helpful fellows.

    Check http://weldingweb.com/forumdisplay.php?16-Miller too.

    http://www.miller4less.com/ is a good parts source.

    You can also check re: useful periodic maintenance for your Synchrowave and on your unstable arc.
    Last edited by farmall; 04-13-2016 at 1:40 PM.

  6. #6
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    Couldn't have gone to better hands for un-fucking that bike. Thanks for posting, keep it up!

  7. #7
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    Can you give the poor lil Evo Sporty its 15 min of glory and snap a pic of it with the "Polish Falcon" front-end on it?

  8. #8
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    sorry bout the pos po.
    but loving all your machine and fab work.

    keep us posted,

    leon

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by farmall View Post
    Old Miller pedals are easy to fix and parts are reasonable. There is very little inside the pedal, mostly a wire-wound resistor and a wiper brush. You can freshen up a Miller pedal very easily and may be much happier with your Synchrowave if you do. Open that bitch up and you'll see how simple they are.

    Here's a generic pic. Many models use the same case and vary by wires and resistor. You can convert them between types if you ever get a machine without a pedal:

    http://www.millerwelds.com/resources...etch?id=516713

    You can download a manual from Miller for free: https://www.millerwelds.com/support/manuals-and-parts and their forums are outstanding. Lots of expertise there on older Miller repairs and some members do cool shit like overhaul feeders, recap power sources and more: http://www.millerwelds.com/resources/communities/mboard

    Determine the pedal model by your welder manual then download the pedal manual.


    The manual has pedal test procedures so you won't just play swaptronics. cruizer and 7A739 on the forums are especially helpful fellows.

    Check http://weldingweb.com/forumdisplay.php?16-Miller too.

    http://www.miller4less.com/ is a good parts source.

    You can also check re: useful periodic maintenance for your Synchrowave.
    That's great info. I actually dug another pedal out of the scrap locker at work and solved the pedal problem, but the machine still sucks. It spent the last 30 years at 400 amps welding aluminum motor cases 16 hours a day. I think it's just worn out. and not worth repairing. The arc is very unstable at low amperages, which is basically everything I am doing. I'm trying to find the budget for a new unit, or I'll just suck it up and bring in my dynasty 200DX from home.


    Quote Originally Posted by ericthebeard View Post
    Can you give the poor lil Evo Sporty its 15 min of glory and snap a pic of it with the "Polish Falcon" front-end on it?
    This bike does not deserve the effort that went into building that front end. It will all be posted here in due time.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by xnewmanx View Post
    Man I WISH i had a CNC. Everything I do is on a 40 year old bridgeport and a 35 year old lathe! Turnin' knobs, baby.

    Most of the parts are just hand shaped on a belt sander/bandsaw.
    aaaah those pedals! i work in a tool room on a 40yr old bridgeport all day as well, j head model boyo, nice work

  11. #11
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    I got a Haifley Bros hard tail section as well. With limited tools and skills im trying my best to make sure it doesn't turn out to look exactly like so many others. I was able to take part in the joining process with my welding pal. I look forward to the day I build my own frame. Trying to buy less and build more, one step at a time. Great fab work. Lookin forward to seeing more.

  12. #12

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    I cracked two of the Haifley tanks in that exact same spot. I rubber-mounted the third. We shall see how it holds up.

  13. #13
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    Man that pedal pad is awesome. Good work saving another bike from PO abuse.

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    More shoddy workmanship. Pulled the tank to put some rubber bungs on it because it was bolted directly to the frame and felt something big banging around inside... drain the gas and peer in... There is a chunk of clearish epoxy tank liner about 1/2" X 6" X 6" thick that has broken free from the walls and is banging around the tank. Upon closer inspection, the whole tank liner is peeling away everywhere.

    I frequently read reviews about tank liners: "shitty product, peeled off after 3 months"... Well, they're probably all written by retards like the previous owner who clearly did zero prep, then turned the tank maybe once, then left it on one side for long enough for a massive chunk to cure. What a dipshit. Anyway, spent a few hours chiseling and removing the liner from inside the tank.

    This guy was the worst. I'm sure he's on CC. I hope he's reading this.

    Anyway, I also got the kicker cover on and it works pretty well. It sticks in position when you kick it down, but I'm hoping that breaks in with time. I hope it can stand up to regular use because I don't intend on using the estart much.

    The new brake setup works well and I am happy with the line configuration I ran. I'll post some pictures soon.

    Lastly, I think I am going to put the kicker cover back in the mill and trim off some of the "fat" on it. Since I'm running a cut down cam cover it looks sorta fucked up.

  15. #15
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    BTW have you checked the spark gap and points condition on the Synchrowave? Of course old machines can get tired, but sometimes it's a combination of little shit.

    Interesting thread including cleaning the new points on a wheel prior to install. Poster ccawgc knows his shit:

    http://weldingweb.com/showthread.php...cy-start-issue

  16. #16
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    Bent up some 6 bend pullback bars this weekend. Finally something that went quickly. Only 2 hours start to finish. 304SS, might polish them though... that'd be a few hours.

    The riding position on this thing is fucking awesome now. So comfortable.









    Also, you can see in the pictures where I am planning on trimming down the kicker cover to match my trimmed down cam cover.

    Kicker review: The bike is kick only currently (ignition switch needs to be replaced), so I've been using it exclusively. Works well, my only gripe is that if the bike doesn't start on the first kick, the kicker pedal stays down. I'm not sure if that's going to break in with more kicks, but I hope so, pretty annoying.
    Quote Originally Posted by farmall View Post
    BTW have you checked the spark gap and points condition on the Synchrowave? Of course old machines can get tired, but sometimes it's a combination of little shit.

    Interesting thread including cleaning the new points on a wheel prior to install. Poster ccawgc knows his shit:

    http://weldingweb.com/showthread.php...cy-start-issue
    Thanks for the info. I actually found a new digital synchrowave with pulse in our warehouse at work that they were going to auction off, but I salvaged it and had it sent back to miller for inspection, so that may work out pretty well.

  17. #17
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    Well, last post showed the process of modifying the kicker cover to support mid controls, and I installed it and drove it around (with no starter motor) for a few days, everything seems good and in order, so I decided to go ahead and mod it further aesthetically.

    Here it is bolted to the T-slot pad on the rotary table (this is the first time I had ever used this item). There was very little to indicate off of to get the center of the boss (only about a third of a circle) but I was able to get it pretty close. I needed to be able to cut a large radius and I have no way of doing that with a manual machine without using the rotary table I'm happy with the results. Here I'm hogging off the straight line portion...



    And adding some radius:



    Next, a little sanding. Tried to shape it similarly to the 4 speed kicker covers of old:





    A little glass beadage:



    And then some installed pictures:








  18. #18
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    Kicker cover looks awesome!

  19. #19
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    damn that thing is thick huh? lookin good

  20. #20
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    Awesome... man that Ledslead cover is a beast!

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