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  1. #41
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    Background: I'm driving this bike to california and back in August, so I wanted some highway pegs. I worked out exactly where I wanted them first, then had to figure out how to mount them. What I didn't want was something that stuck out really far when I wasn't using them. Most of the time highway pegs are just a normal size peg on a long bracket, so when you fold them up, they still stick out really far. I came up with a design that allowed me to keep it skinny when not in use.

    So first, I did some lathe work...



    Followed by some mill work. These fish scales match my exhaust. Also I had to buy an 8" long socket head cap screw for these. The biggest screw I own based on length/diameter ratio by far.



    Then roughed out a mounting bracket:



    Shaped it with a file and sander:



    Gave it a rough polish:



    Then mounted it to the bike. Position is perfect.



    I should have wiped this down before taking the pic but oh well...



    Here's the best part though. Nice and skinny when folded up. Clears fork perfectly.



    Another shot.



    Looks like a fuckin' light saber on my bike. Darth would be proud.



    Oh yeah, I also hardtailed this BT evo frame over the weekend for a CC member... Used my old shovelhead jig, but modified it to be a little longer.



    Fitup was righteous:



    There is no weld here. You know you did a good job when all the tubes stay in place by themselves.

    Last edited by xnewmanx; 05-23-2016 at 7:24 AM.

  2. #42
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    Decided I don't like the blue frame. From ride-able bike to bare frame, 1 hour, 20 minutes.


  3. #43
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    Click image for larger version. 

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    leon

  4. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by billybiltit View Post
    Click image for larger version. 

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    leon
    Haha. It's a combination of thinking all motorcycles should have black frames and also that the paintjob was shitty and just chipping off EVERYWHERE.

    Still hope to ride this to Fuel on Friday.

  5. #45
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    Aluminum medical oxygen cylinders are cheap at yard sales and thrift stores if you want the basis of a sexy (and tough) aluminum fuel bottle. oil bag or other cylindrical container. They come in a variety of sizes and are thick enough to etch. My image was deleted from my old post so I don't have a pic of the wall thickness after bandsawing, but it was about 3/16".

    http://www.chopcult.com/forum/showthread.php?t=35508

    Size chart:

    http://www.sunsethcs.com/oxygen/imag...nder-specs.jpg

  6. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by xnewmanx View Post
    Haha. It's a combination of thinking all motorcycles should have black frames and also that the paintjob was shitty and just chipping off EVERYWHERE.

    Still hope to ride this to Fuel on Friday.
    right on!
    i'm with ya on the black frame thing.

    leon

  7. #47
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    Filled some holes, cut off some extra stuff. Used my awesome Metabo tube polisher to smooth out lots of things. Dropped her at my blaster/powdercoater, he rushed the job through for me and I picked it up that evening after work.

    Reassembly took about 5 hours. I also added in some deutsch connectors to the harness I'd made earlier this year. Also replaced the rubber barb hoses on the oil tank with black braided lines with AN hose ends. Now it looks 100x better to me. I'm very very happy with the results.



    This picture sorta stinks, but I wanted to show where I also cleaned up the area under the oil tank which I will use later for an auxiliary fuel tank.


  8. #48

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    Wow man, nice work. Everything seems so easy when you have tools and the skill to use them!!! Haha. Enjoy that thing this season!!

  9. #49
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    Made a headlight bracket before Fuel Cleveland. I'm really into polished stainless before welding lately.


  10. #50
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    So I won 500 bucks of lowbrow store credit at the grand opening party with my turbo shovel, I used it to buy some stuff:



    The main things I got were:
    Shotgun sporty exhaust and heat sheilds
    Old STF air cleaner
    35mm Fork shrouds
    CV carb top and bowl screws
    Also a bunch of fab components

    I extended the fork shrouds 6"




    Then got them chromed (also got my sissy bar chromed).









    I'm not in love with the look, but it inspired me to make my own that are a little less bulky. I'm working on them soon and should have an update in a couple weeks. You can see the new old STF air cleaner as well.

    I also turned some speed dealer pegs into some stubby passenger pegs:



    Then I put the rest of the stuff on my old lady's sporty which I picked up a few weeks ago for dirt cheap. When I got it the primary leaked, the turn signals didn't work, the clutch was all fucked up and the speedo didn't work.



    I fixed all that stuff and added:

    Burly slammer kit
    The shotgun exhaust and heat shields
    Benchmark air cleaner (take-off from my sporty) w/ gasbox support and lowbrow breather
    Drag spec speedo
    Removed front signals, new bullet rear signals, added led indicators on headlight eyebrow, badlands load equalizer
    New grips
    Easy clutch
    520 conversion
    Cut down sprocket cover
    Polished up everything, straightened out some bent stuff.








  11. #51
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    Your bike is looking dope man, you put some really nice machine work onto that thing, great job!

  12. #52
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    This is yet another awesome build thread. Outfreakinstanding!

  13. #53
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    For some reason I cannot edit my post so ....

    I suspect that your kicker return spring is weak. If you do not have an OEM spring ( yeah, rare birds these days) I would cut an inch out of the one on the bike and form a new cup to catch the stud. Form the curp with a torch and oil quench it. It won't be perfect, but for that application it will be good enough.

  14. #54

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    Wow really neat location for the speedo on your old lady's bike!

    What is that cam cover on your's?

  15. #55
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    Quote Originally Posted by BuxBitza View Post
    For some reason I cannot edit my post so ....

    I suspect that your kicker return spring is weak. If you do not have an OEM spring ( yeah, rare birds these days) I would cut an inch out of the one on the bike and form a new cup to catch the stud. Form the curp with a torch and oil quench it. It won't be perfect, but for that application it will be good enough.
    The kicker actually "broke in" and now it doesn't stick down... I'm a little concerned about the hardness of the gear, so I haven't permanently removed the electric start (although it isn't wired currently)

    Quote Originally Posted by panheadpete View Post
    Wow really neat location for the speedo on your old lady's bike!

    What is that cam cover on your's?
    Thanks. Was a perfect fit and the stem bolt already had the hole in it.

    The cam cover on my bike is an EMD. But beware, it's a cam cover "cover". The cut down OEM unit is behind it. I just put it on because it was free with the EMD primary cover.

  16. #56
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    A little front end reworking...



    This whole project started as a concept of making a "drop tree" to get a little extra length out of my 6 over fork tubes without buying new uppers.



    So I came up with this design. Similar to a Yamaha XS650 top tree except with the correct offset and spacing for 35mm forks.



    Sent a cad model off and had a pair of these cast. Not cheap, but two were nearly the same price as one. Go figure.



    Obviously, the tree needs to be machined, so the first thing I did was indicate the part and clamp it to the table so I could drill the riser bolt holes



    Then I built this clamping fixture to allow me to hold the part tightly.



    Installed the part on the fixture.



    Then bored the holes for the stem and the fork legs.



    One thing to note, the 35mm fork legs have tapered tops, so I needed a way to cut them. I don't have any CNC equipment, so I have to get creative. Cutting a tapered hole accurately without ordering a custom ream was going to be a real challenge. I can't even circular mill with an endmill (although I'd have to have a 4.5 degree endmill custom made anyway) In this shot I am straight boring the leg holes to the minimum ID of the taper.



    So I made this fixture. There's a lot not shown here. This is the "bottom". These pins sticking out of the fixture are an interference fit and are now permanent. On the opposite side, there are two counterbored holes exactly in line with these pins machined to the exact ID of the holes I bored in the tree on the last step. Since I had precisely bored the fork legs straight to the ID, I was able to slide a pair of locating pins through the fork leg holes in the tree and then into the counterbored holes on this fixture. Then I tightened the bolts that held the tree to the fixture and removed the other locating pins.



    In this shot the pins are frosty from soaking them in liquid nitrogen for the interference fit.



    Then I mounted the whole fixture to the vice on the rotary table and tipped the head of the bridgeport to 4.5 degrees and spun the part. Ghetto circular milling!



    Last thing to do was to cut the slot for the pinch bolt (after machining the hole and threads for the pinch bolt).



    Success! Everything fit perfectly.



    Next I made some wheel spacers. Again, since I have no CNC, I have to get creative with tapering... Here I show how I cut everything with steps, then hand file/sand them smooth and shiny.



    See? Smooth and shiny!



    A couple steps later I have some nice wheel spacers that cover the bearings.



    This is another part I wish I took more pictures of. Since I am making fork shrouds that are pretty long (6 over standard) I turned down a piece of delrin to essentially clamp onto the fork at the midway point and support the shroud. (generally fork shrouds are just supported by the ID at the very top and a tab that picks up the lower pinch bolt.

    These delrin bushings have an oring groove cut in them that is a nice tight fit on the ID of the fork shroud tube I chose: seamless 2.25 X .065 wall in 304SS. (The standard lowbrow fork shrouds are 2.75 OD)



    In order to make the shrouds, I rolled some 20G stainless sheet into a cone and welded it to the tube.



    Then I sanded down the welds and blended everything.



    After a lot more sanding (really, a lot of work is omitted between these steps...)



    Then took it to the buffer.



    Next I had to cut a window for the lower tree to pass through.



    Here are both windows cut.



    Another shot. Once I could fit them over the lower tree I trimmed the length down top and bottom as well.



    Next I made some tabs to mount the shrouds to the pinch bolts. It's always easier to shape and buff small things while they're still attached to big things.



    This is how you know you did OK.



    Welded the tabs on for a test fit...



    Everything seems to go well.



    And here's the final product once I got all the correct hardware on. I'll try to post up some more pictures when I can. Check out the wheel spacers.



    Oh yeah, I also polished up my stainless bars. I think my next project is to fab some new risers. Overall about an 80 dollar job and about 400 dollars in material. Extended my fork forks by 1.25 inches so now my front end is 7.25 over. :P


  17. #57
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    These slim fork shrouds are totally awesome

  18. #58
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    Love it dude, excellent fab work!

  19. #59
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    dude, awesome work! i work on a bridgeport most everyday at work, love seeing good use of whats available, that trick with the rotory table is slick!! who did the castings? bringing this thing to voodoo and burnt rubber? i'd make the trip to RI to see this bike haha

  20. #60
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    Quote Originally Posted by birthcontrol View Post
    dude, awesome work! i work on a bridgeport most everyday at work, love seeing good use of whats available, that trick with the rotory table is slick!! who did the castings? bringing this thing to voodoo and burnt rubber? i'd make the trip to RI to see this bike haha
    Thanks. I was racking my brain for weeks trying to figure out how to do it. Then it just popped in there.



    Here are some more pics I took this AM with a bit more detail.










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