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    Default Custom Length Brake Lines

    I went 12 over on my front forks recently and need new brake lines. Bike is an 88 Virago 1100. I got a quote for 3 lines @ $165. I'd rather not spend that much cash on lines... Anyone know a cheaper place to order from or advice on a kit/parts to make lines? I don't care if they're pretty.

    I have 1 line I can reuse and I need 2 lines at like ~34". Banjo size is 10mm. Maybe there's a bike out there someone knows of with lines about that size.

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    There is (was?) a Dude at the Long Beach Swap Meet out here in so cal that made
    up custom brake lines, About a year ago I had Him make me one and the price was
    real reasonable. very good quality as well.

    I may have His business card, I'll report back If I can find it. $165 for 3 lines is highway robbery.

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    Word man thanks a lot. I'll be stoked if you find his info

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    A high quality 34" Goodridge or Russell universal SS brakeline is $30-40/ea. Banjo fittings (if you can't reuse yours) are $10/ea.


    You can buy them anywhere for that much (or cheaper). Just an example for you to thumb through... http://www.jpcycles.com/catalog/2015Harley pg 768-770 has everything you need. If you happen to want fancy, all black + black hardware, look a few pages before that.
    Last edited by boomboomthump; 02-11-2016 at 12:46 PM.

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    What boomboomthump said.

    You can find all sorts of brake lines and banjo fittings cheep on Ebay. You can also visit your local hydraulic shop. Most people forget those exist, but they can get and build you anything.

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    dennis kirk or dime city cycles

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    I used to have yoyodyne make my lines.

    It's easier to buy the goodridge stuff BBT mentioned, and that's what I've done for most of my builds.

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    Bill at Greystone. He use to do the LB swap. He's in Huntington Beach, Ca.

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    great thread here. I'm wondering if anyone can help me here. I'm trying to figure out the correct thing to do here. I have a -3an tube nut with stainless steel tubing going through it and a switch with -3an male fittings. do I double flare the tube's end to 37 degee to match up to the male fitting?
    exact parts:
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    Yes you need to match the flare and a double flare is stronger...........

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    TC Bros has them too, banjo bolt types, precut and you cut to fit.

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    Have you got pictures of the 12 over Virago? That is something I would like to see.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tattooo View Post
    Yes you need to match the flare and a double flare is stronger...........
    thanks a bunch, what I thought I just wanted to be sure. so with a 35 degree flaring tool can you also do double flares or is that a different tool?
    Last edited by firstripholdmybeer; 12-14-2019 at 12:15 AM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by firstripholdmybeer View Post
    thanks a bunch, what I thought I just wanted to be sure. so with a 35 degree flaring tool can you also do double flares or is that a different tool?
    It depends on the tool??????? Some have the adapter and some don't.............

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    G and J Aircraft in Ontario Ca will make anything you need while you wait.

    http://gandjaircraft.net/index-4.html

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    Quote Originally Posted by firstripholdmybeer View Post
    thanks a bunch, what I thought I just wanted to be sure. so with a 35 degree flaring tool can you also do double flares or is that a different tool?
    A double flare begins with a bubble flare. A double flare kit will have the black disks you see here:

    https://www.amazon.com/ARES-18019-Fl...365907&sr=8-19

    The flare is then compressed down, and folds the edges on themselves, creating a "double" wall flare.

    But, you're doing stainless? It is brittle and it may not take a double.. You'd almost have to try it and see? Watch for cracking on the edges, because if it is going to fail to do a double that is the spot that will split.

    I see some 37 degree tools here and there, but none with the adapters. May take some digging to find.

    They also seem to be expensive.

    https://www.amazon.com/41162-Precisi...6365907&sr=8-4

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    37 degree flares should use a sleeve between the flare and the nut to prevent breakage and aren't double flared. You can get the nuts and sleeves through Speedway or aircraft houses.

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    https://www.mcmaster.com/50675k118

    I know they use them on copper to prevent splitting.
    Last edited by confab; 12-14-2019 at 7:59 PM.

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    My original post expired, so a bunch of stuff read:

    Quick Tip: Tubing
    When flaring a tube, it is important to read all the instructions carefully. Before you flare the tube, deburr and chamfer both edges of the tube. This allows the tube to roll over and create a smooth edge. To deburr the inside edge, use a drill or file and rotate the file in the opening of the tube; the outside edge can be done with a standard file. Tube cracking is caused when the tube is not properly deburred. Do not cut tube with a tube cutter. When the cutter becomes dull, it hardens the end of the tube causing flaring to be very difficult. Flaring tube takes practice and an understanding of how the tool works. Once the practice is put in, the understanding will follow.

    the secret to double flaring 3/16 stainless brake line is to use annealed 304 tubing...

    the coiled stainless tubing is 0.028 wall and "double annealed" for making flaring and bending easier.

    You will fall in love with the Nicop or cunifer line .
    Very easy to work with.

    The SS lines can be a real PITA to get to seal up. Some people use the AN fittings and the single 37* flares with the SS and get slightly better results. There's also a new cone shaped diamond hone out, available in both 37* and 45*, to smooth the inside of the flare, but I haven't talked to anyone or read anything online about how well that works and/or if it helps at all.
    https://www.jalopyjournal.com/forum/...-woes.1068567/



    Brake Shop: Tubing Selection and Bending
    Another decision youíll need to make is what type of tubing youíre going to install. There are four basic types that are appropriate, safe and DOT-approved for use as brake lines: mild steel, coated steel, alloy and stainless steel.

    Mild steel tubing is the entry-level choice and itís the type of tubing thatís installed by many vehicle manufacturers. The tubing is galvanized and a zinc coating may be applied, but this provides only a modest amount of protection from rust and corrosion, both on the inside and the outside of the tubing. If a vehicle is expected to be exposed to harsh environments like snow, road treatments or salt air on a regular basis, other tubing types should be considered.

    Coated steel tubing features a ďplasticĒ polyvinyl fluorine (PVF) coating thatís baked and cured to the line. Underneath the coating, some manufacturers feature a double-wall, low-carbon-steel, copper-brazed tubing. PVF tubing can be more easily bent into shape. The PVF coating does not flake or chip, leaving the steel substrate protected against rust, offering corrosion resistance thatís 30 times greater than galvanized steel alone, according to its manufacturers.

    Alloy brake tubing is composed of a combination of nickel, iron, manganese and copper. While the single largest component of the alloy is copper (nearly 90% in some formulations), alloy brake tubing should not be confused with plain copper tubing. And plain copper tubing should never be used in a brake system; it lacks the strength and resistance to bursting that are required for safe operation of the brake system. Alloy brake tubing has the same structural integrity of plain steel tubing but offers better corrosion resistance characteristics and is easier to work with and bend into shape than plain steel.

    The final choice is stainless-steel tubing. The principal advantage of stainless-steel tubing (if its name didnít already give this away) is its resistance to rust and corrosion in its unadorned and uncoated form. Stainless-steel tubing is somewhat harder than other tubing types, which can make it difficult to bend into the necessary shapes and more difficult to flare. This may be why prebent stainless tubing kits are an attractive alternative.

    Stainless tubing should not be cut with a tubing cutter or die grinder, as this will work-harden or heat-treat the material and make it brittle and prone to crack. Stainless tubing must be cut with a 32-teeth-per-inch saw. Use light pressure while cutting so the tubing stays round.

    Once cut, chamfer and deburr both inside and outside edges of the tube. This allows the tube to roll over to create a smooth edge when flared. Use a step drill bit to deburr the inside edges. Rotate the bit in the opening of the tube. The outside edge can be done with a standard file. Stainless tubing cracks typically occur when flared if itís not properly deburred.
    https://www.motor.com/magazine-summa...g-august-2018/
    Last edited by TriNortchopz; 12-14-2019 at 10:41 PM.

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