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  1. #1

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    Default Welding tips & Tricks?

    Doing my first chop/bob on a 79 cb750. Had the frame sent off to have hardtailed because i am new to welding and wanted that part to be done professionally. I just learned how to weld here recently and feel comfortable enough to do some of the weld work on it when i get the frame back. I will be borrowing a family members' Miller 110v wire feed mig welder. I need to weld on some things like the solo spring seat mount, bungs for the new tank and rear fender mount. Since I am new to welding, are there any things to keep in mind while welding those pieces to the frame? I am only asking because i do not want to screw up the structural integrity of the frame. Any tips are appreciated! Thank you!

  2. #2

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    is the miller 110 a gas rig or flux core?

  3. #3

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    Flux core

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    Flux core works but it's not the greatest way to weld things you're gonna want asthetically pleasing or hold up really well to vibration. It'll work and good experienced flux welders can get lay good beads down. I'd see if it'll run on gas and get solid wire for it. It's a little more forgiving in my opinion. Other then that, make sure the areas are super clean-no paint or grease. Chamfer the pieces if you can so you get good penitration. And practice welding the same types of welding you'll be doing on the bike so you feel comfortable with the process and position you're welding in.

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    I think I am able to use gas with this welder also so that is something I will look into...looks like ill practice up before I start welding on the bike. Thank you for the advice!

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    Remember to reverse the polarity when you switch from flux to solid core or you will have hell

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    That's right. Thank you, I did read that I would have to reverse the polarity when I go to gas.

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    Yes do yourself a favor and use gas! Fluxcore is kind of a uselesd method for bike application.
    Otherwise the most important thing is to remember the gas shield.
    Otherwise you will end up with porous catshit welds.
    You will probably want a little more amps than wire feed as well, makes the welds a bit less lumpy, with smoother surface.
    Tig is the way to go though!

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    one little trick to good performance out of a 110 unit, plug it directly into the wall or use a large gauge extension chord, you can also talk to you're welding/gas supplier and ask about custom gas mixes to bring the temperature up. ie like a 90/10 mix.

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    There's nothing wrong with self shielded wire.

    You can make a very strong weld that looks very decent with it.

    The problem is 99% of the people who naysay it can't run it properly.

    It's used to weld bridges together guys, there's no reason not to use it on bike stuff.

    A smaller welder could be helped along by a little preheating but that's that.

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    Quote Originally Posted by datadavid View Post
    Yes do yourself a favor and use gas! Fluxcore is kind of a uselesd method for bike application.
    Otherwise the most important thing is to remember the gas shield.
    Otherwise you will end up with porous catshit welds.
    You will probably want a little more amps than wire feed as well, makes the welds a bit less lumpy, with smoother surface.
    Tig is the way to go though!
    ...Flux Cored wire, both self and dual shielded ARE wire feed.

    I think you're confusing MIG and Wire Feed. They're not the same thing. One is a blanket term for a deposition process, another is a specific welding process.

    And TIG is nice and clean, with less chances for inclusion...but on bike stuff any feeder will do a very decent and more than adequate job in the right hands.

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    Quote Originally Posted by IronHead73 View Post
    There's nothing wrong with self shielded wire.

    You can make a very strong weld that looks very decent with it.

    The problem is 99% of the people who naysay it can't run it properly.

    It's used to weld bridges together guys, there's no reason not to use it on bike stuff.

    A smaller welder could be helped along by a little preheating but that's that.
    Oh no, they are two very different methods.

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    Quote Originally Posted by IronHead73 View Post
    ...Flux Cored wire, both self and dual shielded ARE wire feed.

    I think you're confusing MIG and Wire Feed. They're not the same thing. One is a blanket term for a deposition process, another is a specific welding process.

    And TIG is nice and clean, with less chances for inclusion...but on bike stuff any feeder will do a very decent and more than adequate job in the right hands.
    I work with this shit daily, running 8 years now, so i would say i know my shit.
    Metal Inert Gas is almost exclusive wire fed machines, you could basically call a Tig welder with a spool gun a MIG machine, but who cares?
    its still a tig machine with a spool gun.
    And this crappy self shielded wire has more in common with MMA and powder shielded arc welding than mig.
    Problem with it is it delivers insufficient shielding gas, and flux material.
    So weld quality is inadequate for any seriously demanding applications.

    Besides i think we mean the same thing, i just dont know all the american terminology.
    Still better than working with northern english welders though, half the time i dont understand a thing theyre saying!
    Last edited by datadavid; 09-02-2015 at 6:57 AM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by datadavid View Post
    I work with this shit daily, running 8 years now, so i would say i know my shit.
    Metal Inert Gas is almost exclusive wire fed machines, you could basically call a Tig welder with a spool gun a MIG machine, but who cares?
    its still a tig machine with a spool gun.
    And this crappy self shielded wire has more in common with MMA and powder shielded arc welding than mig.
    Problem with it is it delivers insufficient shielding gas, and flux material.
    So weld quality is inadequate for any seriously demanding applications.

    Besides i think we mean the same thing, i just dont know all the american terminology.
    Still better than working with northern english welders though, half the time i dont understand a thing theyre saying!
    If you're spool gunning something, you're MIG welding it. The power source doesn't determine the process.

    Spooling lacks tungsten alloy electrodes to carry the arc. So if you have a TIG power supply and you run a spool gun (which isn't common because TIG power supplies are CC) that'd still be a mig process.

    "Crappy" self shielded is the key term.

    Running a NR232 wire is awesome, and nothing like stick or metal cored wire. It's got its own personality, but if you know how to run it it's a great weld. Dual shielded flux core is positionally similar to stick, but not so much metal cored as the 1-4 position ability is lacking in most metal cored wires (not all, but most).
    Last edited by IronHead73; 09-02-2015 at 9:53 AM.

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    Either way, self shield is just fine on a bike. Get quality wire and study up on HOW to run it. Some things are totally different. It's a fact that most people don't actually know how to run it correctly though. Short of Ironworkers there's really not too many trades that utilize it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by IronHead73 View Post
    If you're spool gunning something, you're MIG welding it. The power source doesn't determine the process.

    Spooling lacks tungsten alloy electrodes to carry the arc. So if you have a TIG power supply and you run a spool gun (which isn't common because TIG power supplies are CC) that'd still be a mig process.

    "Crappy" self shielded is the key term.

    Running a NR232 wire is awesome, and nothing like stick or metal cored wire. It's got its own personality, but if you know how to run it it's a great weld. Dual shielded flux core is positionally similar to stick, but not so much metal cored as the 1-4 position ability is lacking in most metal cored wires (not all, but most).

    No no, there are spool guns with tungsten electrodes, basically a tig burner with automatic feed. Real handy things!
    They should be available in the u.s for all i know, after all you guys invented the tig.
    Now girly(TIG) welders like myself rarely venture into the dirty businesz of automated welding so i admit im not too interested in all the species of wire feeders.
    Fucking boring jobs they are, and i try my best to avoid them.
    But i take your word that there exists self shielded fluxcore wires out there that actually works, i mean there are literally thousands of different mma sticks for all purposes out there.
    So of course there should be wires that can produce ok welds.
    I love this about welding: you can never know everything. Theres just too much to know.
    Last edited by datadavid; 09-02-2015 at 12:32 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by datadavid View Post
    No no, there are spool guns with tungsten electrodes, basically a tig burner with automatic feed. Real handy things!
    They should be available in the u.s for all i know, after all you guys invented the tig.
    Now girly(TIG) welders like myself rarely venture into the dirty businesz of automated welding so i admit im not too interested in all the species of wire feeders.
    Fucking boring jobs they are, and i try my best to avoid them.
    But i take your word that there exists self shielded fluxcore wires out there that actually works, i mean there are literally thousands of different mma sticks for all purposes out there.
    So of course there should be wires that can produce ok welds.
    I love this about welding: you can never know everything. Theres just too much to know.
    Auto fed TIG setups. Yes, I didn't realize that's what you meant. That's still TIG.

    FWIW: I TIG everything I can. I hate MIG welding. But it has its time and place. (I just find I can TIG all of those too. Haha)

    Yeah, the only stupid thing we can do it think we're done learning.

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    the only way you would ruin the integrity of the frame is putting massive amounts heat in one spot and then cooling it rapidly. With your little welder as long as your aren't welding on the same spot for 10 minutes and then dumping water on it you should be fine.

    fluxcore works but as stated its not very new welder friendly unless you spend some time with it.

    Another thing to keep in mind with mig is that it can be very deceiving to the new welder, its possible to lay down a great looking weld and then just knock it off with a chisel because you didnt melt the parent metal. If you treat it like a caulking gun, thats all it is and the welds will be weaker than caulk.


    edit: dont cool any of your welds with water. Let them take the time to cool naturally and if its something thin weld for only short amount of time separate from each other and let the material air cool often
    Last edited by deathmetaldan; 09-02-2015 at 5:29 PM.

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    DP76, you have heard from the welders already, now a tip from an NDT monkey . Buy yourself a few tins of penetrant, solvent and developer so you can check for surface defects in your welds. You should be able to find enough info online for what to do, but as a very rough rule, clean the weld, apply penetrant, leave it to dwell for 10 mins, clean it off with lint free cloth, apply developer and wait to see if you get bleed out.

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    Quote Originally Posted by saorsa View Post
    DP76, you have heard from the welders already, now a tip from an NDT monkey . Buy yourself a few tins of penetrant, solvent and developer so you can check for surface defects in your welds. You should be able to find enough info online for what to do, but as a very rough rule, clean the weld, apply penetrant, leave it to dwell for 10 mins, clean it off with lint free cloth, apply developer and wait to see if you get bleed out.
    Good advice.

    God damned quality control.

    (I do both, so don't take offense. Just razzing ya.)

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