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  1. #61
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    I've picked up a LOT of great info on the forum below. A guy could literally spend days reading on there. They have free memberships and paid memberships. I have the free one but will probably upgrade just as a "thank you" for all the info I've gotten.

    http://www.bbq-brethren.com/forum/index.php

  2. #62
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nottso View Post
    Smoked Beef Ribs


    Beef ribs are by nature real fatty and the object is to render as much fat as possible. I used to work part time in a smoke house where beef ribs were the house specialty and needless to say I have more than a few racks working there.

    The temp we used was 220 - 230 and after a thick coating of your favorite rub, they were smoked for 4 hours with the membrane on. Then we cut the ribs apart but removed the membrane first at this point.

    The ribs were sauced and placed in a foil pan, covered and placed back in the smoker for another 2 hours at the same temp, at which time more fat is rendered and the meat steams and tenderizies because of the closed enviornment. This stage is crucial or you end up with fairly fatty, tough ribs. Additional sauce is added before serving.

    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

    Again, this recipe is not mine. The guy I got it from was fine with it being shared around, I just don't want to take credit for something that isn't mine. The above is a direct copy/paste from the original forum post that I got the recipe from.

    I prefer beef short ribs as opposed to beef spare ribs just because the meat is much thicker. Either way works as well as the other, though.

    The only thing I do differently is to remove the membrane before cooking so that I'm not trying to remove it with the ribs already hot. Unfortunately, removing the membrane beforehand is a huge pain in the ass. Removing the membrane from beef ribs is a lot harder than removing the membrane from pork ribs... at least for me it is, anyways.
    What temp do you cook your beef ribs to? I'm fairly new to smoking but have had my best turnout so far with boneless spare ribs pulled off at 205. I pan sear first, then I place them in foil boat for about an hour, then close up the foil til temp. then i usually pull them and rest for a bit while i crank the temp up and finish them hot... any suggestionx?

  3. #63
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    Suggestions...? Yeah, I have one for you. If what you're doing works for you, keep doing it, even if the so-called "experts" tell you it's wrong. You are the greatest expert of all when it comes to what you and your family like.

    I don't even try to measure internal temp on ribs (beef or pork). It's just too hard to get a decent reading. At least for me it is but that's due to the meat being so close to the bone. Boneless ribs would be a lot easier to probe internal temp and if I did cook them to an internal temp, 205 is where I'd go with beef ribs (or pretty much any beef on the smoker).

    I've found that following the instructions above, my beef ribs always come out good and as tender as a guy could ever ask for. It sounds like what you're already doing is pretty much the same thing or at least follows the same basic principles. If the foil pan sounds simpler, maybe give it a shot one of these times. Or not. If you're happy with what you have going on now, stick with it.

    I'm not at all afraid of hard work when it comes to the smoker but if I can do something in a simpler fashion without compromising the quality of the finished product my old, fat, lazy ass is all for it.

  4. #64
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    Nottso yeah I cook alot of beer can chickens and usually always have very good results with them. They are so simple. I cook mine on the grille at med-high indirect heat with apple wood for smoke. I cook mine on my grille because I can stoke it up at the end and really get the skin crispy. Mmmm meat potato chips.

  5. #65
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    Ya gotta do a turkey. At least once. Trust me on this.

  6. #66
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nottso View Post
    Ya gotta do a turkey. At least once. Trust me on this.
    I will have to try one. I usually either deep fry or just smoke turkey. Never thought to shove a can up his ass.

  7. #67
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    I wanna try smoking some of this.

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  8. #68
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nottso View Post
    Ya gotta do a turkey. At least once. Trust me on this.
    Wrap a wild turkey in LOTSA bacon and smoke over cherry or apple.make a nice sausage stuffing to stuff the bird with

  9. #69
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    Duck boneless leg of lamb another duck on the spit marinated with wine, olive oil, balsamic vinegar, garlic,salt & pepper
    a can of cherry pie filling, a can of sour cherries, A can of black berry pie filling, a can of peach slices with a box of cheap cake mix poured on top and sugar with cinnamon sprinkled on top in the Dutch Oven
     photo 2015-08-02 18.11.42_zpsp5zqdjtg.jpg

    While the meat is resting a few chese stuffed green chilies.
     photo 2015-08-02 18.37.58_zpshnbqny0e.jpg
    Proceed to feast
    Dusty

  10. #70
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    Another favorite of mine is the Bacon Explosion which is called a Fattie in some areas. Anybody that hasn't ever done one of these needs to. They are really, really good and damn near mistake proof.

    http://blog.bbqaddicts.com/recipes/bacon-explosion/

  11. #71
    DarleneKuehl
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    Quote Originally Posted by 53rigid View Post
    I love grilling out as well, but all of you surpassed me in the meat department, here is my recipe for Italian taters on the grill

    4-5 medium to large sized taters
    fresh garlic
    1 stick of butter
    olive oil
    salt and pepper
    Italian seasoning (the little shaker version you find in stores)
    1/2 of miller lite (or whatever you want)

    Place the stick of butter on top of some aluminum foil, slice the taters up thin and put over the top of the butter. Put as much or as little as you want of the olive oil on top. season with salt, pepper and the italian seasoning to your preference, cut up https://fishandcaviar.com/product/os...r-pasteurized/ and add the fresh garlic cloves and top it off with some beer. Close it up and let her rip for about 30-40 minutes on the top rack of your grill or until the taters are nice and soft. Enjoy!
    Surely, caviar is very necessary not only for them, but for all the people. So if you are looking for the best, just ask and you will get it as soon as necessary. Make sure in the quality with them.

  12. #72
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    Since somebody revived this thread, ran into something I would share. Had this idea for a long time, and was generally met with puzzled looks until I met a truck driver from Alberta, BC, Canada whose family ran a cattle ranch. This is something to do if you are having a LOT of people over or having some kind of a party. Plan on doing this sometime in the near future on a buddies property he just bought in Arizona. This is the directions on roasting a whole cow. You start with a pan or structure for the coals. You lay down a two inch layer of coals, followed by a two inch layer of small, wet, wood, followed by another two inch layer of coals. You build or somehow construct a big ass spit to put the cow onto. You attach a motor to the spit, geared down to rotate the spit at 1.5 revolutions per minute. On top of this, construct a steel hood with holes in it for ventilation. Leave the cow rotating on the spit for ten to fifteen hours, then invite a shitload of friends. The guy who told me about this said they would do this once a year on his cattle ranch in Alberta while the ladies were doing canning. If someone tries this out, let me know how it turns out.

  13. #73
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    Pretty much guaranteed to work. The interesting part would be the powered rotisserie and there are many examples of those. If you make height adustable (welders could use standard pipe stands) you could downsize to pigs etc.

  14. #74
    HellyBrown
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ramzilla View Post
    I love taters and this sounds spectacular and easy (I am starving though) Gonna try this one. Keep this shit up guys I know there are recipes everywhere but I would rather try shit that like minded folks who don't keep fresh whatever the fuck, sherry and caviar from https://fishandcaviar.com/product-ca...r/coho-salmon/ in their house. Cooking with beer and aluminum foil? Fuck yeah I got that shit.
    I will try this receipt further. It is very interesting and seems tasty. That is the reason, why I look for the new ones everywhere. What caviar can be used here? Black? Red?

  15. #75

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    Default Baby Back Ribs

    Peel the membrane and rub them with Emeril's.

    Smoke them for an hour or so.

    Remove, cover with dark brown sugar, wrap with foil and return to smoker to finish.

    You can stuff large jalapeno peppers with cream cheese and chopped up bacon, throw those in there, and have them for a side.

  16. #76
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    Fool proof smoked ribs. Get a rack of babyback or st louis style spare ribs and peel the membrane off the back, gripping it with some paper towel will help, then rub with a cooking oil like olive oil or canola and hit with your rub of choice. smoke the ribs uncovered for 3 hours at around 240 degrees, after 3 hours lay out 2 layers of heavy duty foil and lay ribs on top and coat ribs with half a cup or so of brown sugar, 3 tablespoons of butter and drizzle with honey. Start to wrap the ribs and pour 1 cup of water in the foil and seal tight and return to smoker or grill for 2 more hours after these 2 hours the ribs should be fork tender. Pull the ribs off the grill and drain the juice that is in the foil into a bowl and discard the foil and return the ribs to the grill and then baste the ribs with that juice a few times over the next half hour. Boom done! no need for sauce with these. The juice that they cooked will make them taste better than any sauce ever could. Try it out and it will be your go to recipe

  17. #77
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  18. #78
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    Years ago My Father married a Chamoro woman (from the Island of Guam)
    The Chamoro's primarily use an easily made home made "sauce"
    or "condiment" for Their cooked meat, Known as Finadene (pronounced:
    Fin - uh - dinny

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    there are different variations, My Step Mother uses:
    Soy Sauce
    Lemon Juice (fresh)
    Vinegar
    Yellow Onion
    Green Onion
    Donie Peppers (or similar small, red, hot peppers)
    & cherry tomatoes
    All chopped into small bits

    The Chamoros put it on the grilled meat & also their Rice, which They
    ALWAYS have with meat, At Holidays They usually cook up a batch
    of Orange Rice.

    Here's a link for more info https://itanohu.blogspot.com/2013/03...ne-recipe.html
    Last edited by Revelator; 2 Weeks Ago at 10:29 AM.

  19. #79
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    Revelator that reminded me of the marinated bacon recipe I got from a Guy from a little island off Gaum. It's better if you have Island chilies to add on top of the americanised recipe that he made for northern New Mexico.
    2 lbs bacon, cheap is fine
    1 cup Kikkoman soy sauce
    1⁄4 cup tong of sriracha sauce
    3 tablespoons oriental chili paste or 3 teaspoons vietnamese garlic and red chile paste
    1 tablespoon granulated garlic omit if using the garlic chili

    DIRECTIONS
    Pour everything except the bacon in a one gallon bag and mix well shake and knead way longer than you think.
    Place the bacon in the bag one slice at a time moving the bag to cover each slice with the marinade or they will stick together and not marinate.
    when there isn't enough marinade to cover any more bacon stop filling even if it's a little more or less than 2 lbs.
    Place in the refrigerator, turning every time you open the fridge. Marinate at least over night up to a week. Over a week won't hurt the taste but the texture gets a little weird after a week or so.
    Grill very slowly. I prefer it slightly soft but you can crisp it up if you prefer.
    Dusty

  20. #80
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    That Finadene brings back memories. Just about every restaurant I ate at on Guam had it sitting on the table. Many variations from restaurant to restaurant, all good.

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