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  1. #21
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    Orange marmalade sriracha wings: combine 18oz Orange marmalade,1/3 cup honey,1/3 cup brown sugar,1/3 sriracha hot sauce.Bring to a boil and remove from heat.Prepare your wings with whatever rubs or marinades you lije and smoke at 225-300 til done.Toss the wings in the sauce and throw em back on the grill for a few to crisp up and set the sauce.I don't t have any pics right now but trust me,these wings are the shit.Everybody that's tried em has loved em. Also,check out tvwbb.com. Its a forum for smoke enthusiasts with kick ass photo galleries and recipes,contests,all kinds of cool shit. Smokin meat has become a new obsession!

  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by turbonate View Post
    That batheque is gangster as hell
    Thanks, here is the clip from the Red Green Show that inspired this madness.

  3. #23
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    Fuck me running those duck sausage look amazing!

  4. #24
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    Meat is great, as my roommates have recently switched to vegetarian, I am really appreciating meat more. However great meat is, there's always room for dessert.
    This is more of a pit thing than smoker or grill thing. I'm talking about cake,...yeah, you heard me correctly I said CAKE! Now, I don't have any pics, so, just try to visualize.
    Good size fire pit, lots of hot coals, dutch oven, your favorite cake mix. Lightly grease the inside of the dutch oven. Make cake mix according to directions on package. Pour mix into dutch oven. Put lid on dutch oven, and place in the center of red hot coals, piling as many coals as possible on top of the dutch oven, and all around it. The idea is to surround/ envelop/ bury the dutch oven with coals. You'll likely want to check it a bit before the time on the package, as coals tend to be a bit hotter than an actual oven. Cook until toothpick inserted comes back clean.

  5. #25
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    I do a lot of grilling, smoking, curing and even pickling meat.

    I won't waste time with telling you recipes for stuff.. A lot of cats on here seem to have that covered. But I can give a little advice on the process, which I've found more than makes up for any additional flavor additives.
    I'll talk steak. Grilling steak specifically, if you want to know more ask, but I don't wanna throw up a huge WOT.

    Your first decision should be cut. Personally, I avoid porterhouses for the grill, technically a porterhouse is three different cuts all still around one bone.
    My typical choice for grilling is a Prime rib. I mean, really, that's a damn good cut for grilling. I like them at least 1.5" thick
    I buy them a week before the day of the grilling. I put them on a plate with a paper towel over them in the fridge. Once in the morning I pick them up, wipe the plate and flip them, then put a new paper towel on top. I repeat the process every morning and evening throughout the aging process.
    The idea is to dry them, 'cause water... has no taste. So get rid of as much excess water as possible.
    I will usually dry them for at least 72 hours, but 96 hours is good too. Sometimes hard brown spots will appear when the time is up. Just trim those with a good knife.
    The day of the grilling, I take the meat out sprinkle a generous amount of large crystal Kosher salt on each side and let them sit on the counter until they reach room temperature.
    I make sure I have good coals with a LOT of heat. Not flame, but heat. Usually takes about 45 minutes to an hour to get the coals that way. I use hardwood lump coal, better heat, longer use.
    Right before I put them on the grill I brush a little olive oil on each side, and them put them on to sizzle.
    Times may vary depending on heat, but the trick is really to not fuck with them at all once they hit the metal. Let them cook. Usually 2-3 minutes for the first side and 1-2.5 minutes on the other.
    You want a crisp caramelized crust, but nice rare to medium-rare center. If you want to thermometer probe them, I remove them from the heat when the center is at 124 degrees. If you cook beyond medium rare. Fuck you. None of this matters, eat a goddamn hamburger or Steak-ums you fucking peasant.
    Then I set them on a platter, put pepper on each side to flavor and let them sit for 5 ish minutes, then serve. I don't pepper before they hit the flame 'cause pepper will burn and taste really bitter.
    So, that's how I deal with steak. Enjoy.
    After

  6. #26
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    As a side dish when BBQing steak the flavor of the meat and charcoal gets absorbed by the zucchini I let lay beside the meat. Easy recipe. Take some cooking oil not olive oil which burns too quick and mix in rosemary, thyme, salt, pepper and hell even garlic powder. Split some 12" or so zucchinis lengthwise after cutting off the ends and baste with this mix. I flip em once when there is a bit of sag as you lift em to flip. Takes only a few minutes and these things are great and even better if you wanna add some cheese on top to melt right after taking em off the grill. Next day these zucchini leftovers taste great even cold.

  7. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by eroticjesus View Post
    I do a lot of grilling, smoking, curing and even pickling meat.

    I won't waste time with telling you recipes for stuff.. A lot of cats on here seem to have that covered. But I can give a little advice on the process, which I've found more than makes up for any additional flavor additives.
    I'll talk steak. Grilling steak specifically, if you want to know more ask, but I don't wanna throw up a huge WOT.

    Your first decision should be cut. Personally, I avoid porterhouses for the grill, technically a porterhouse is three different cuts all still around one bone.
    My typical choice for grilling is a Prime rib. I mean, really, that's a damn good cut for grilling. I like them at least 1.5" thick
    I buy them a week before the day of the grilling. I put them on a plate with a paper towel over them in the fridge. Once in the morning I pick them up, wipe the plate and flip them, then put a new paper towel on top. I repeat the process every morning and evening throughout the aging process.
    The idea is to dry them, 'cause water... has no taste. So get rid of as much excess water as possible.
    I will usually dry them for at least 72 hours, but 96 hours is good too. Sometimes hard brown spots will appear when the time is up. Just trim those with a good knife.
    The day of the grilling, I take the meat out sprinkle a generous amount of large crystal Kosher salt on each side and let them sit on the counter until they reach room temperature.
    I make sure I have good coals with a LOT of heat. Not flame, but heat. Usually takes about 45 minutes to an hour to get the coals that way. I use hardwood lump coal, better heat, longer use.
    Right before I put them on the grill I brush a little olive oil on each side, and them put them on to sizzle.
    Times may vary depending on heat, but the trick is really to not fuck with them at all once they hit the metal. Let them cook. Usually 2-3 minutes for the first side and 1-2.5 minutes on the other.
    You want a crisp caramelized crust, but nice rare to medium-rare center. If you want to thermometer probe them, I remove them from the heat when the center is at 124 degrees. If you cook beyond medium rare. Fuck you. None of this matters, eat a goddamn hamburger or Steak-ums you fucking peasant.
    Then I set them on a platter, put pepper on each side to flavor and let them sit for 5 ish minutes, then serve. I don't pepper before they hit the flame 'cause pepper will burn and taste really bitter.
    So, that's how I deal with steak. Enjoy.
    After
    I didn't know the pepper thing. I've always salted and peppered before cooking. I'm interested in learning more if you care to type anymore especially on curing and smoking.

  8. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by Knuckleduster View Post
    Meat is great, as my roommates have recently switched to vegetarian, I am really appreciating meat more. However great meat is, there's always room for dessert.
    This is more of a pit thing than smoker or grill thing. I'm talking about cake,...yeah, you heard me correctly I said CAKE! Now, I don't have any pics, so, just try to visualize.
    Good size fire pit, lots of hot coals, dutch oven, your favorite cake mix. Lightly grease the inside of the dutch oven. Make cake mix according to directions on package. Pour mix into dutch oven. Put lid on dutch oven, and place in the center of red hot coals, piling as many coals as possible on top of the dutch oven, and all around it. The idea is to surround/ envelop/ bury the dutch oven with coals. You'll likely want to check it a bit before the time on the package, as coals tend to be a bit hotter than an actual oven. Cook until toothpick inserted comes back clean.
    Does it taste any different than cooking in an actual oven?

  9. #29
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    I fuckin love using my smokers! since my forced retirement I spend the majority of my time bbq'ing and drinking beer. I have a wood burner that I reconfigured and I just recently got an electric one for real long overnight cooks.Click image for larger version. 

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    my first overnight cook in the electric smoker I did a 13lb packer brisket that I injected with powdered beefy onion soup that I mixed with beef broth and rubbed with salt, pepper, onion and garlic powder and smoked with the jack daniels aging barrel chips. it cooked for 20 hours @ 225 and was hands down the best piece of meat I have ever cooked.Click image for larger version. 

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  10. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ramzilla View Post
    I didn't know the pepper thing. I've always salted and peppered before cooking. I'm interested in learning more if you care to type anymore especially on curing and smoking.
    Hmm, sure.
    Well, let's tackle curing and smoking. Or really, brining and smoking. I'll tell ya, otherthan a steak a good corned beef, or pastrami can really make a meal.

    I'll try to make this one shorter... mostly because cook times and specific cures/rubs are fun to experiment with, so consider this an overview.
    Again, we start with the meat. Head to your butcher and get yourself the entire brisket. Yes, the entire brisket. You won't be sorry. I usually end up somewhere in the 8-12 pound range for a brisket. I trim t so that there is around .5-.75” of fat.. Sometimes less.
    Now it gets crazy.. Freeze your brisket overnight. I know weird, but really it helps with the brining. Make sure when you freeze it, you set it up in a way that will allow it to fit in your bucket frozen solid.
    Next, you’ll want a 5 gallon food safe bucket. I have a few, I prefer the ones with the screw tops just because they are easier to deal with once something is inside them.
    Next, make your brine.
    I use….generally, 12 quarts water, 4 cup kosher salt, 8 tablespoons saltpeter, 6 cinnamon stick, broken into several pieces, 6 Table spoons mustard seeds, 6 tablespoon black peppercorns, 1 large handful whole cloves, 1 large handful whole allspice berries, 1 large handful crumbled bay leaves, 5 teaspoon ground ginger, 4 onions, quartered, 3 large carrot, coarsely chopped, 3 stalk celery, coarsely chopped. A lot of people use either honey or brown sugar as well. I don’t.. but that’s preference.
    I bring the water to boil, dissolve the salt s, then let it cool to room temp.
    Place brisket in bucket. Pour cool brine over frozen brisket, and park in your refrigerator for 10-12 days.

    Congratulations, you just made a corned beef. You can cook it, and slice it, boil it and serve with cabbage and potatoes for some Micks, whatever…Or…
    You can take the freshly corned beef and put it in a bucket of cold fresh water overnight..to take the really briney salty taste out, then mix up 12 tablespoons fresh coarsely ground black pepper, 6 tablespoons coriander powder, 3 teaspoon mustard powder, 3 tablespoon brown sugar, 5 tablespoon hot paprika, 8 teaspoons garlic powder, 8 teaspoons onion powder.
    Coat the meat with olive oil and spread the rub very liberally. There should be no rub left and the meat should be completely covered. At this point, I let it sit for another 8ish hours covered in the fridge to let the oil get the rub to stick better.
    Now, I use an indirect smoke.
    I have a barrel grill with a side smoker, so I put the brisket as far away from the heat source as possible, and baby sit the thing to keep the temp between 160 and 175 degrees. Wood is like engine oil, or spark plugs, pick whatever you like the best.
    I try not to go longer than 4-5 hours, because after that the fat gets melted so much that it never seems to slice right.
    Once smoked, I refrigerate for another 10ish hours, then I use my bamboo steamer to heat it up, slice it thick and boom.. the best pastrami you’ll ever had.

  11. #31
    Knuckleduster
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ramzilla View Post
    Does it taste any different than cooking in an actual oven?
    Yes, there is a rather unusual smoke flavoring throughout the entire cake,....smoked cake.

  12. #32
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    Cool I might try it.

  13. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by eroticjesus View Post
    Hmm, sure.
    Well, let's tackle curing and smoking. Or really, brining and smoking. I'll tell ya, otherthan a steak a good corned beef, or pastrami can really make a meal.

    I'll try to make this one shorter... mostly because cook times and specific cures/rubs are fun to experiment with, so consider this an overview.
    Again, we start with the meat. Head to your butcher and get yourself the entire brisket. Yes, the entire brisket. You won't be sorry. I usually end up somewhere in the 8-12 pound range for a brisket. I trim t so that there is around .5-.75” of fat.. Sometimes less.
    Now it gets crazy.. Freeze your brisket overnight. I know weird, but really it helps with the brining. Make sure when you freeze it, you set it up in a way that will allow it to fit in your bucket frozen solid.
    Next, you’ll want a 5 gallon food safe bucket. I have a few, I prefer the ones with the screw tops just because they are easier to deal with once something is inside them.
    Next, make your brine.
    I use….generally, 12 quarts water, 4 cup kosher salt, 8 tablespoons saltpeter, 6 cinnamon stick, broken into several pieces, 6 Table spoons mustard seeds, 6 tablespoon black peppercorns, 1 large handful whole cloves, 1 large handful whole allspice berries, 1 large handful crumbled bay leaves, 5 teaspoon ground ginger, 4 onions, quartered, 3 large carrot, coarsely chopped, 3 stalk celery, coarsely chopped. A lot of people use either honey or brown sugar as well. I don’t.. but that’s preference.
    I bring the water to boil, dissolve the salt s, then let it cool to room temp.
    Place brisket in bucket. Pour cool brine over frozen brisket, and park in your refrigerator for 10-12 days.

    Congratulations, you just made a corned beef. You can cook it, and slice it, boil it and serve with cabbage and potatoes for some Micks, whatever…Or…
    You can take the freshly corned beef and put it in a bucket of cold fresh water overnight..to take the really briney salty taste out, then mix up 12 tablespoons fresh coarsely ground black pepper, 6 tablespoons coriander powder, 3 teaspoon mustard powder, 3 tablespoon brown sugar, 5 tablespoon hot paprika, 8 teaspoons garlic powder, 8 teaspoons onion powder.
    Coat the meat with olive oil and spread the rub very liberally. There should be no rub left and the meat should be completely covered. At this point, I let it sit for another 8ish hours covered in the fridge to let the oil get the rub to stick better.
    Now, I use an indirect smoke.
    I have a barrel grill with a side smoker, so I put the brisket as far away from the heat source as possible, and baby sit the thing to keep the temp between 160 and 175 degrees. Wood is like engine oil, or spark plugs, pick whatever you like the best.
    I try not to go longer than 4-5 hours, because after that the fat gets melted so much that it never seems to slice right.
    Once smoked, I refrigerate for another 10ish hours, then I use my bamboo steamer to heat it up, slice it thick and boom.. the best pastrami you’ll ever had.
    I make corned venison in a similar manner and then can it. Open said can and place some meat on a piece of toast with a little provolone on top. Put in oven until cheese is melted. Makes an outstanding open faced sammich.

  14. #34
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    last night I fired up the grill and while that was getting ready I took two swordfish steaks and drizzled olive oil on tinfoil laid the steaks over the tinfoil sprinkled sea salt, lots of pepper, sliced up a lemon and placed them on top of the swordfish and on top of the lemons I chopped up some kale and placed tossed them in there.
    a little butter on top of that. and more pepper. wrapped everything up in to a tinfoil hot pocket and tossed that on the grill.. 8 minutes on one side and flipped the packet and cooked for another 8 minutes.
    I thought the kale would take on a fish taste when in fact it got lemon infused. so I had myself lemon infused kale over a thick peppered swordfish steak

    this is the left over steak I'm gonna heat up tonight and munch..

  15. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ramzilla View Post
    I make corned venison in a similar manner and then can it. Open said can and place some meat on a piece of toast with a little provolone on top. Put in oven until cheese is melted. Makes an outstanding open faced sammich.
    I don't get a lot of time to hunt, and I sometimes don't even get one a season...But a good friend just picked up some acerage with a healthy deer population.
    We plan to murder a hell of a lot of meat this year. I've never done a corned venison....
    And now I need to make venison pastrami.

  16. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by eroticjesus View Post
    I don't get a lot of time to hunt, and I sometimes don't even get one a season...But a good friend just picked up some acerage with a healthy deer population.
    We plan to murder a hell of a lot of meat this year. I've never done a corned venison....
    And now I need to make venison pastrami.
    It is spectacular. My favorite way to can it.

  17. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by loddytoddy View Post
    last night I fired up the grill and while that was getting ready I took two swordfish steaks and drizzled olive oil on tinfoil laid the steaks over the tinfoil sprinkled sea salt, lots of pepper, sliced up a lemon and placed them on top of the swordfish and on top of the lemons I chopped up some kale and placed tossed them in there.
    a little butter on top of that. and more pepper. wrapped everything up in to a tinfoil hot pocket and tossed that on the grill.. 8 minutes on one side and flipped the packet and cooked for another 8 minutes.
    I thought the kale would take on a fish taste when in fact it got lemon infused. so I had myself lemon infused kale over a thick peppered swordfish steak

    this is the left over steak I'm gonna heat up tonight and munch..
    Dude that sounds good as hell. I love swordfish but it's hard for me to get fresh unless we go deep sea fishing.

  18. #38
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    I'm less than $300 into my UDS (Ugly Drum Smoker). Many are built for around 175 to 200 but I added a number of my own tricks. I have 5 cooking grates total that are adjustable in height via pilasters and clips and all hardware is stainless. I burn only lump charcoal and a full basket will hold 225 degrees for about 16 hours, damn near as steady as an electric. I'm shocked at how well it holds temperature. I threw away my old offset after the first couple of cooks on the UDS. I have a couple of other barrels here to build a "tee" shaped UDS next. If you Google UDS you'll find all kinds of plans online. Well worth the effort.

    The Univac looking fucker to the right is a "Barbecook" charcoal grill from Belgium. It's all stainless and over 15 years old. It uses no lighter fluid at all. You simply put 2 pieces of newspaper in the center leg/chimney, light it off and 15 minutes later you're ready to cook. I also use only lump charcoal in it. This thing was like 900 bucks way-back-when but I bought it on eBay for $76 brand new in the box. Possibly the best thing I ever bought. It took some getting used to as it burns crazy hot with very little charcoal but once i got dialed into it, it has been great.

    One or the other of the 2, and sometimes both, are running nearly every single day, year-round. I make all my own rubs and sauces. It keeps me outta the taverns.


  19. #39
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    Nottso how about divulging some of those rub and sauces recipes?

  20. #40
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    Ram,

    I will but the last few days have been insane as will the next few. Country Thunder aka "Hillbilly Fest" starts tomorrow and runs through Sunday. It's the world's largest country music festival and it takes place 1/4 mile from my driveway. It's the biggest pain in the ass on Earth. The only redeeming factor is that I can fit a LOT of cars on our place at $10 per car per day.

    Any of you single cats in the Northern Illinois/Southeastern Wisconsin area might wanna check this shit out, though. Even the most hideous of chuds can get their little dinky stinky at this deal.

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