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    Default New Avon Safety Mileage Tire - Frustrated

    I put this in the Main section because various bikes can run an Avon Safety Mileage MkII 5.00-16.

    I have a hardtail Ironhead. I had a Dunlop 130/90-16 on there that was nearly out of tread AND the pressure was kept around 18-20 lbs (I think). I set it a long time ago and it has been riding smooth and nice. The engine is balanced so vibrations aren't bad even though it is a 67 Ironhead in a rigid frame.

    So...I got me a super nice looking Avon Safety Mileage 5.00-16. This tire is taller and skinnier. The rubber seems harder. When I picked up the wheel it had a weight on it...so I am assuming it was balanced....Its a big old weight like a piece of wrigley spearmint gum. Prior to this the wheel had just a few weights around a spoke or two.

    I am riding around on the new tire now...and anytime I get above 30 mph or so....it feels like the bike is going to shake the filings out of my head. It never felt that way with the old tire.

    So...is it....balanced wrong? Probably not.
    Just how it is because of the compound/sidewall hardness etc....?

    or should I lower the pressure down to 16-20 lbs? I think there are over 32 lbs in there now.

    I am frustrated to say the least. My bike was a nice rider before I got this tire.
    Last edited by IronheadVic; 06-18-2015 at 6:14 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by IronheadVic View Post
    I put this in the Main section because various bikes can run an Avon Safety Mileage MkII 5.00-16.

    I have a hardtail Ironhead. I had a Dunlop 130/90-16 on there that was nearly out of tread AND the pressure was kept around 18-20 lbs (I think). I set it a long time ago and it has been riding smooth and nice. The engine is balanced so vibrations aren't bad even though it is a 67 Ironhead in a rigid frame.

    So...I got me a super nice looking Avon Safety Mileage 5.00-16. This tire is taller and skinnier. The rubber seems harder. When I picked up the wheel it had a weight on it...so I am assuming it was balanced....Its a big old weight like a piece of wrigley spearmint gum. Prior to this the wheel had just a few weights around a spoke or two.

    I am riding around on the new tire now...and anytime I get above 30 mph or so....it feels like the bike is going to shake the feelings out of my head. It never felt that way with the old tire.

    So...is it....balanced wrong? Probably not.
    Just how it is because of the compound/sidewall hardness etc....?

    or should I lower the pressure down to 16-20 lbs? I think there are over 32 lbs in there now.

    I am frustrated to say the least. My bike was a nice rider before I got this tire.
    If you've changed tires, the wheel needs to be re-balanced. If the wheel is new to you, I'd balance it before running it.

    Run whatever tire pressure is on the side of the tire, minus 3-4 psi to account for air expanding as the tire heats. If the ride is too rough, drop a few psi.

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    Thanks, yeah, I just re-read what I typed, it isn't the clearest.

    The wheel/tire was balanced before with the Dunlop, just a few little spoke weights. Rode nice.

    When I picked up the new Avon mounted to that old wheel, it had a huge weight sitting on it. I assumed the shop just did this, balancing it when they mounted the new tire.

    I guess I will mess with the air pressure next. Just not sure how low is 'too low'.

    I ALSO tightened up the chain some after remounting the new wheel/tire. It was super loose before, now its just 'kind of loose'. Don't know if this will make a difference but this is all I have changed.
    Last edited by IronheadVic; 06-18-2015 at 6:16 PM.

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    I run my Dunlops at like 17-18, 32 would be brutal. But idk, the Harley Dunlops are stiff as hell, idk if thats too low for an Avon.

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    Tire could be out of round, well all tires are, some just more than others. Maybe find an old school tire shop that still trues tires. And get some dyna beads for balancing and lose the spoke weights.

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    If the chain is too tight at it's tight spot you'l get vibrations and premature chain and/or bearing wear.
    All the spacers installed correctly? Did the sprocket/drum get removed to fit on the tire changing machine? Was it reinstalled correctly?
    I'd ask the shop to re- balance. I've had to do it. And a reputable shop should work with you on the labor. I'd eat the price and have in similar situations.
    Some shops refuse to remove or install spoke weights. Only adding the stick ons to bring a wheel/tire assembly into balance. They are afraid of damaging the rim and/or spokes.
    Hydraulic tire machines can squeeze a rim out of round
    Some tires are shit new. If the cording is damaged....
    Some sit on a shelf too long. What is the date code on the sidewall?
    You should be fine with as little as 15psi in the rear tire, with a tube that is. I run my ridgeds at 28psi.

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    Quote Originally Posted by IronheadVic View Post
    I think there are over 32 lbs in there now.
    Way over inflated for that type tire. Try around 18 psi plus or minus.

    Bob

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    Well, finish this thread out for future use by others.

    The tire when given back to me by the shop was aired up fully. I have since let the air out to about 20 psi. The shaking and vibrating are back to normal (somewhat pleasant). In addition, the bumps in the road are not bad either.

    So....if you get a new tire mounted from a shop that doesn't know its for a chopper....make sure you deflate it down to the 17-22 psi range.

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    try the dyna beads? could work out more shake...

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    One thing to point out is what if the shop did not get the tire beaded up properly? This would present a huge safety issue. It may be worth your time and safety to air the tire back up to the recommended pressure and look at where the tire meets the wheel all the way around on both sides. If it were not seated on the bead properly then it would be obviously uneaven in one spot. I would also double check your sprocket/ pulley axle hardware, spacer installation etc. There is a chance you got a bum tire as was stated or they botched the balancing job?

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    Quote Originally Posted by TuffLuckTom View Post
    One thing to point out is what if the shop did not get the tire beaded up properly? This would present a huge safety issue. It may be worth your time and safety to air the tire back up to the recommended pressure and look at where the tire meets the wheel all the way around on both sides. If it were not seated on the bead properly then it would be obviously uneven in one spot. I would also double check your sprocket/ pulley axle hardware, spacer installation etc. There is a chance you got a bum tire as was stated or they botched the balancing job?
    This could not be emphasized enough! About 14 years ago, I got a flat on my CB750 chop front tire on a Saturday and had to walk to that motorcycle mega store in Covina, CA, I took the wheel in had a new tire mounted and balanced...although they were super busy, the manager said he'd squeeze it in. Walked back to the scoot and bolted the wheel up and scooted down the road. No more than 20 miles away in a long turn going 55 the tire decided to "unmount" itself from the wheel in front of my eyes. In order to prevent from laying it down I brought the bike upright which sent me straight into the guardrail and launch me 100 feet into some oleander bushes.

    I learned this day to ALWAYS check your bead on a newly mounted wheel...and never have a mega store work on your bike

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