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  1. #1

    Join Date
    Sep 2013
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    Default have a question for management workers

    So fellas I have an opportunity ahead of me. I am going to be interviewed for a project coordinator position. Im 22 and this is a chance to have a damn good job and work up to a good position benifts and the works.

    What do you guys look for in your assistance/helpers in management positions. Whats expected to already be known whats the learning curve if you will? Any info is good info and is much appreciated in advance

    Edit: working in the sign industry. Thanks for pointing that out bill.
    Last edited by scuzzy; 12-27-2014 at 12:27 AM.

  2. #2
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    you don't say what type of business this is but just about any employer is looking for the same basic attributes in an employee. willingness (and ability) to learn, the ability to work with others without friction, punctuality, a good work ethic
    and respect for superiors. know what the goals of the company are and how you can help them meet those goals.

  3. #3
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    Own up to mistakes, don't make excuses. And don't bitch about doing anything, if they are paying you, you do it. Nothing pisses me off more than a guy saying "thats not my job" or "why am I doing ... all the time and so and so doesn't". And of course show up every day and be on time. Pretty much what you would expect from anyone. What makes a manager over a general employee, is stuff like that, Ohh and something that I have always done that I noticed done by my managers years ago, is if you have a problem with someone under you tell them!! Don't just talk about them to other managers then all of a sudden that person is getting written up or fired. I always give heads up if I have issues, you would be surprised how many managers will bitch about someone and that person has no clue, as far as they are concerned they are doing a good job. And my last peeve is when I hear managers bitching about subordinates with other subordinates, a big no no in my book.

  4. #4

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    Thanks for the heads up keys much appreciated. I do own up to my shit. I grew up in a military house hold so one thing that was instilled in me as a young age was that. Own up take the ass chewing and learn from it. Also say "i cant do that" fuck id get an ass whoopin for that shit. Would it bother you if a new employee was always asking how his doing and or how do i improve? I mean it sounds like stupid question but iv had bosses show you or teach you only what they want you to know andthats it.

  5. #5
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    I started out in a management position at a really young age. I'm a the plant manager for a manufacturer of plastic laminates and over about 30 people at the age of 29, been in the position about 4 years now. I'd say the most important attribute for a young manager is the ability to earn and keep the respect of your subordinates. If you are like me, most everyone below you will actually be older than you. So how do you gain their respect? Pitch in...don't be afraid to dig in and do the dirty work alongside your help. Don't ask anyone to do something you wouldn't be willing to do yourself. Be decisive and confident, no one likes a manager that is wishy washy, it comes off like you don't know what you're doing and you'll lose respect. Also, if you don't know the answer to a question or an issue don't be afraid to admit it, dont wing it, no one likes a know it all especially when they are wrong. Instead, do the research and don't be afraid to pull from the knowledge base in your employees...and if you get the answer from one of them, give them credit for it! That will get you the respect you are looking for.

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    Yes totally agree with jbdad on that. And always hold your ground just in a reasonable respectable manner. I had a fellow lead that would just snap on guys, and heard it all the time. Guys wanting to move over to my crew because he was such a hot head. Show respect for your people and you will get respect back, but don't be a pussy either. Like JBdad said be decisive and don't let them run you. Remember years ago, I was only 28 years old and running a crew of about 6 guys. There was this one old black guy on it and it seemed like we did not get along at all, always butting heads and he would ask shit like why are we doing this or that, while the other shifts won't do it. And I always kept calm and reasonable, although it was tough. Thought that guy hated me. Well after about a year, I got a great job offer and gave my 2 weeks. He pulled me aside my last day and said that he would miss me and enjoyed working on my crew. I could tell he meant it, and was totally surprised, although he did not agree with me all the time, I think he appreciated how I had rational behind my decisions. Think a lot of times he was testing me. And you will get that from guys, they will push you and see what you can take very much like the teachers back in school, the push over teachers got walked all over.

  7. #7
    Cisco726
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    Professionalism. Treat other the way you'd want to be treated.

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    I spent time in management and I looked for the basic attributes - reliability, willingness to learn, ability to work as a team, etc. But a big one for me was one's passion for the job. I can teach someone to do the job and anyone can be a damn fine employee just by being reliable and showing up every day, doing the job, staying out of trouble. That's easy enough. But the employee I really want is the guy that really loves what he does and has the drive and motivation to go above and beyond the bare minimum. That's the guy that will last and advance his career.

    Sign business, fab shop, restaurant, police department, doesn't really matter, it's pretty much universal.

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    22 years in trucking management. From front line supervisor, to terminal manager, to regional vp level. The recurring theme of respect is dead on. Consistency is key along with removing emotion as much as possible from decisions. When coaching or disciplining, always focus on the specific behavior, not the person.

    Early on I tried to be too much of a friend, that's a huge pitfall as well.

  10. #10
    Cisco726
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    You definitely have to draw a very obvious line between friend and boss. Just remember you catch more bees with honey.

  11. #11
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    Pick out the biggest dude in the room. Clobber him with w/ a brick, drop trou, and while youre dribbling your nut bag on his nose, point around the room and inform them all that "you're all my bitches, now."

    Joking aside, going into a management position as a whelp is challenging if the majority of your staff is much older and has years of experience in the job. Expect some resentment from those older staff members who think the position should have gone to them.
    If youre unfamiliar with the nuances of the job, don't be afraid to pick the brains of the experienced staff members, but make the decisions yourself, thats why you were hired for the gig. If you fuck up, own it. Don't try to pass it down the line. If your staff fucks up, own that too. Back up your people, always. Hold them accountable, but back them up. If your staff knows your have their back, you'll gain their respect, and they'll work hard for you. That being said, don't be a punching bag on behalf of a guy who is constantly putting your dick in the ringer. The staff needs to know that benevolence has its limitations.

    As a manager, you can delegate authority, but you cannot delegate responsibility.

    Admonish in private, praise in public.

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    I have to disagree with getting in there and helping them out. While it may seem to be a cool way for them to respect you fast, it also makes them expect you to do it all the time. You were hired because you know how to do the job, you really do not need to prove it to them.

    Also, one thing I learned is never, ever be afraid to hire someone smarter than yourself. You know things they don't and they know things you don't. But they will only increase the overall value of the team.

  13. #13
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    As a manager, I want someone who is willing to question how I want something done, but will still do it my way if I still insist. That also means that as a Manager, you need to be willing to listen and consider the other idea, and if it's better than yours, sack up and say so.

    One thing I hate is for anyone, management or not, is to not admit you screwed up. I get so many people that will answer my questions with what they think I want to hear or with what they know they SHOULD have done when trying to figure out what went wrong. There is a guy here that I watched mess with something I was working on, and when I said "hey don't touch that" he looked right at me and said "I didn't touch anything". It's probably been 4 years and I still don't trust him.

  14. #14

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    well fellas thanks for all the input its much appreciated. So I went to the interview and I didnt get the job. There were two other people that were more qualified than I but scored a job in a different department. So all is good. I have high hopes for this new job, pretty dope.

    Sign installer got my hourly wage plus benifits after 90 days, not bad for 22.

  15. #15
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    Congrats on the job.

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