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  1. #1
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    Default How to: Make your own Motostuka style gloves

    Originally posted at our blog, www.thehangrychaps.blogspot.com


    So I've been thinking about getting some new gloves and kind of like the Motostuka Shank Gloves. The price tag is kind of high, $75 I'm perfectly willing to pay for quality, until I found out that, by the company's own admission they are repurposed store bought gloves.
    This got me to thinking that if all they are is a set of hardware store gloves with the cuffs cut and restitched and waxed with some kind of waterproofing, why couldn't I do that?
    I went to Tractor Supply and picked up a pair of of deerskin gloves and a can of mink oil for under $17. I think the Motostuka's are cowhide, but I liked the softness of the deerskin better so I chose those.

    (Optional)
    I soaked the gloves in a bow of warm water for about 10 minutes, wrung out the excess water, and proceeded to wear them around the house for a few hours like a creeper until they dried. (I actually cheated a little and put them on the top of the grill as it was cooling from dinner to speed up the process.) This step really isn't necessary but it helps to give the gloves a more custom fit, especially if they are a bit tight to begin with.



    Next, take a seam ripper or a sharp knife if you aren't as fancy as me all all pull out all the stitching out of the lower cuff. There should be two different seams you need to get out, but in the end you should have something that looks like this.


    To stitch the cuff, the Motostuka's use waxed thread. Now you might wonder where you are going to find that, I say check the bathroom you crafty motherfucker and find some dental floss. Not only is it waxed, but it's durable as shit. The stitching process on mine wasn't pretty because I didn't have a good leather needle or a way easily push the needle through, but in the end I got it to work.
    I just folded the cuff over to the length I wanted and did a simple loop stitch. After I got all the way around, I ran the thread around each stitch twice as I went the fold. I'm sure there is a better way to explain this, but I'm not really experienced in this.
    After the stitching was done I used a heavy coat of mink oil rubbed into the leather with a focus on the seams.

    With both gloves stitched and oiled, I thought I was done until I noticed how oily and sticky they were even after trying to buff them with a horsehair brush. After doing a bit of internet research, I found that baking mink oil into boots with the kitchen oven was a common practice.
    I set the oven at 170 and put the gloves on aluminum foil for 20-30 minutes.

    The final result was a pair of gloves that are soft, short and hopefully waterproof, all for under $17.

    Last edited by Ato; 06-11-2014 at 6:32 PM.

  2. #2
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    nice

  3. #3
    RaisingKane7x
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    nice how to.
    look into getting a "speedy sticher" from Lee Valley or the like, great for stiching/ repairs to heavy materials,
    would make finishing the cuff a breeze if you plan to do more.


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    i done been doin' this shit for a couple pairs. used the awl above. easy. used a (harbor freight i think?) leather punch to make some lil vent holes on the back of the hand, kinda adds a nice detail.

    lately i've been wearing Mechanix or some racing style shorties with gnarly plastic knuckles and sliders

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    If I were to do more I would definitely get something to make the sewing portion easier. It looks pretty rough in a few spots and was a pain in the ass to run the needle through two pieces of leather at once.

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    I do some stitching on thick sole leather.
    I use linen thread, a small bit of beeswax that I run the thread through and a heavy leather needle.
    I don't like the awls, personal preference I s'pose.
    If the leather is thick.. Holsters, Knife Sheaths, Boots etc. I use a drimmel and a tiny bit.

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    Looks great. I've done this, but without the stitching. Guess I'm to lazy.. I really soak mine in mink oil while wearing the gloves like I'm "washing my hands" before I stick 'em in the oven. And I bake 'em for a good hour.. Soft as hell and keeps me dry. On my hands at least.

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    I might give them another coat, cook them again just for the hell of it. As far as the stitching goes, there is really no need for it, I was just curious to see if I could replicate the look.

  9. #9

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    I hang iron with them for a week, cut the cuff off, scrub the yellow dye off my hands and sell them as vintage for 3 times what I paid. It's ok cause I brand them TIGHTWAD USA first.

    start with Wells Lamont...the company sold all American made products 30 years ago...try finding out where their Chinese gloves are made today.

  10. #10
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    i made my own too..got some wells lamont gloves for like 7 or 8 bucks i believe. spend another 2 bucks on sinew thread from either hobby lobby or michaels and spend anoter 5 bucks on dye. they came out pretty good, they look somewhat yellow in the pictures but thats cause the lights were pretty bright otherwise they are brown in regular lighting. im sure they could use another coat of dye. sowing leather is tough you really have to push to pierce it.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails gloves1.jpg   gloves2.jpg  

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    Looks awesome will have to try, Have a pair of short gloves I love but want to get another pair that isnt as "Performance" looking lol (Mine has knuckle dusters/padding/whatchamacallit

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    Quote Originally Posted by Spade115 View Post
    Looks awesome will have to try, Have a pair of short gloves I love but want to get another pair that isnt as "Performance" looking lol (Mine has knuckle dusters/padding/whatchamacallit
    I've got a pair like that. They are probably way safer to wear, but damn if they won't fit in my back pocket like these.

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    mines take up both inside pockets of my vest without feeling the bulg as if they were both in on. lol

    went looking for another pair they dont make em anymore. so going to make my own for comfort. lol

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    Great tutorial on making a custom set of gloves. I like the brown leather type work gloves for riding as I have the billet aluminum grips on my sled. I looked at the the gloves on Lowbrow's web site but I'm to cheap to pony up 80 bucks. I will give your method a try. I have trouble finding gloves that even fit as I have huge hands so ordering a set of gloves like the Moto Stuka's is a gamble. I wonder if the moto stuka gloves are made in china and the mods are made in USA? They are stamped "made in USA" .

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    Inventive, lot of work for gloves. But it rang your bell, and impressive, good jale hombre.

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    the wrapped stitching is a modified chain stitch. I learned how to sew years ago starting in Boy Scouts. Did a lot of my own insignia and various leather crafts. In the guard, that skill helped save me tailor fees I put all my own stuff on my M65, BDU's etc. I also worked with sewing some historical stuff.

    Anyway to wrap the edge I suspect what they do is:

    1. Use a very thin coat of contact adhesive to hold down the fold on the cuff. You basically apply thin amount to both sides, let it get tacky and press together. I'd also possibly skive the leather BEFORE gluing (use a razor blade and scrape the area on the back that is being folded in or over to make that section thinner) The glue is to keep things flat and tidy so you can sew it more easily.

    2. once the glue has dried a bit, you have choices, they make an awl like device specifically to make the hole prior to stitching. It's just a sharp pointy thing, not the type that actually sews. If you have a dremel with a small teeny drill bit, you can also slip a block of wood inside the glove and proceeed to drill tiny stitch holes all around (the wood prevents you from drilling through both sides) NOTE: do not buy the pitchfork looking tool that you hammer into leather, that is used for saddles, and very stiff leather work. The awl that sews is also typically used for that work too. We are simply adding a decorative stitch to very soft leather. But hey, everyone is different so do what is more comfortable for you.

    3. The edge stitching is a modified chain or warping or blanket stitch (google is your friend) proceed to stich round the cuff edge. You could do it several ways so I'll let you research that part

    But very cool idea and mod.

    Lee
    Last edited by CISO1969; 07-09-2014 at 1:03 PM.

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    Thanks for the How to, but careful on the oven. I just ruined one pair after soaking them in mink oil and putting them at too high temperature (300)...

    Good thing that those wells lamont are damn cheap, I am getting another pair but might not do the oil thing.

    And I found thick waxed thread at Jo-ann.

    Fred

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    Click image for larger version. 

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    I made some as well. instead of cutting the cuff off I ripped the thread out and then applied a little fabric glue and rolled them up to where I wanted them length wise..
    then used black thread that I waxed doubled it up and went to town on sewing it. used the blanket stitch.
    then boot polish to dye the leather and finished them off with some water proofing spray that sealed the boot polish as well.
    turned out pretty nice IMO

    the wife didn't think I could do it after seeing the first few stitches.

  19. #19
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    I gave these a try. Bought some mink oil $10, Well Lamont's $7, some wax thread, vegetable oil for aging waxed thread $5. End result:Click image for larger version. 

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  20. #20
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    The stitching looks a hell of a lot better than mine.

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