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  1. #1
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    Default HOW TO: xs650 frame with modern HD front end

    stock neck



    remove fork lock mess



    remove the "belled" ends of the neck







    make an insert for the now hollow neck. The o.d. of the insert should match the neck's i.d. and the i.d. of the insert should match HD neck cup's o.d. I start with a tube that's just a bit larger and turn it down for a press fit



    I also put a small bevel inside each end. Makes pressing in the neck cups a little easier



    pressed in



    At this point you can weld the hole left from removing the fork lock. This will also help hold the insert in place.

    neck cups pressed in





    front end installed



    The cool part about this is that we were easily able to swap standard neck cups with 3 degree raked cups to help the stance

    Last edited by mreed; 11-15-2013 at 5:42 AM.

  2. #2
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    Nice!

  3. #3
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    Awesome, thanks!


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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    hell yeah, very cool

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    can you do something like this to a kz750?

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    Quote Originally Posted by liquidlife1991 View Post
    can you do something like this to a kz750?
    I imagine this could apply to any neck that is larger than a stock HD neck.

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    You should consider making a few of these inserts up and selling them. I'm sure more than a few people would be interested. I know I would if I was doing an HD frontend swap.

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    ^^^ yep.

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    Slick and well done.

    That trick would work for many front end swaps because it avoids doing anything complicated to the original neck and the plug weld gets rid of the fugly fork lock boss.

    "Timkens"/tapered roller bearings are not just sold as what you get when you order "HD neck bearings", they are also sold with different inner and outer race diameters.

    For example you could choose a different inner race which fits the Harley outer race, and if need be turn your new fork stem down slightly (don't weaken it) to fit.

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    Quote Originally Posted by mreed View Post
    stock neck



    That's pretty slick! What did you use to cut that neck?

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    A six-inch cutting disc (use the thin sort, .040 or .045") in an angle grinder will make short work of cuts like that. (6" beats smaller discs in reach, longevity and edge speed. A 4.5" grinder motor will drive them but mod the blade guard to fit if you value your fingers.)

    You can also use those discs in a circular saw if you use a couple of washers to adapt them.

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    Damn dude, you have a much steadier hand than I do! I could never cut that straight with a angle grinder!

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    Quote Originally Posted by farmall View Post
    A six-inch cutting disc (use the thin sort, .040 or .045") in an angle grinder will make short work of cuts like that. (6" beats smaller discs in reach, longevity and edge speed. A 4.5" grinder motor will drive them but mod the blade guard to fit if you value your fingers.)

    You can also use those discs in a circular saw if you use a couple of washers to adapt them.
    no, not an angle grinder. I use a 3" pneumatic cut off wheel. I never use an angle grinder for cutting.


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    I've been back to this thread a half dozen times. I am using the same technique to put an HD front end on an old Honda Scrambler frame. Already have some DOM tubing waiting for the lathe. As soon as the bearing cups get here I'll be making chips and sparks thanks to your inspiration

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    Quote Originally Posted by mreed View Post
    no, not an angle grinder. I use a 3" pneumatic cut off wheel. I never use an angle grinder for cutting.
    That still takes a pretty steady hand to get it straight, even more so with those stiff pneumatic hoses!

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    Quote Originally Posted by sgilliesjr View Post
    That still takes a pretty steady hand to get it straight, even more so with those stiff pneumatic hoses!
    It's just what I'm used to. I imagine if you were to fashion a chop saw blade to a weed whacker and used it every single day you would eventually become rather accurate with it.

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    He's right. It's all repetition.

    A piece of masking tape helps hold lines on stuff that doesn't mark particularly well.

    Note that I don't use a large-motored angle grinder. 6" Metabos etc are the same physical size as smaller grinders and will cut 3/8" steel plate if you let the wheel float and take your time so you don't overheat the motor. I like die grinders too but dat 6" surface speed is the shit. I hadn't used one until the pipe welder instructor I worked for showed me why they are so popular.

    BTW if you want a kickass, tough electric die grinder the Milwaukee 5196 is sweet. Even welding students rarely kill them and they could break a bowling ball with a feather. They aren't small but they'll run the fuck out of flap wheels and cutting discs. I like electric die grinders for the torque. They aren't cheap at about three bills, but if you have a shop or just like good gear get one.

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    Finally got to try it out... check it:
    Since nobody makes a HD to Scrambler bearing swap kit, I made my own. This is the neck insert made from DOM tubing turned to the ID of the Honda neck, and bored for an interference fit with the Harley bearing cups.



    Here's how that project starts. If you measure between the integrated bearing cups on the Honda you'll find they are 5.625" apart. Coincidentally, that's length of a factory Harley neck without cups. So, we carefully lop them off (only one had been cut off when I took the pics)...



    Home grown press installs the neck bushing.

    spot welded, then bearing cups pressed in.

    Forks installed

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    ^ beautiful work. Very cool.

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    Quote Originally Posted by mreed View Post
    ^ beautiful work. Very cool.
    thanks man! I wouldn't have tried it if it weren't for this thread!

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