CHOP CULT HOME
Email Password
Search
Page 2 of 9 First 1234 ... Last
  1. #21
    Senior Member

    Content on this page requires a newer version of Adobe Flash Player.

    Get Adobe Flash player


    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    968

    Default

    Keep it up, Thanks for the updates, Im ready to step up to a shovel and this thread is giving me the confidence to do the work, im learning a lot.

  2. #22
    Senior Member

    Content on this page requires a newer version of Adobe Flash Player.

    Get Adobe Flash player


    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Posts
    336

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by bobbed06 View Post
    Thanks for taking the time to explain whats goin on. I am just starting to learn about shovels. Do you have details on the crankshaft install?

    Why did you drill that drain plug boss?

    I put it in *just* in case I need to diagnose oil sumping in the lower end. Nothing more. If I never need it, great. If I ever do, it'll be handy.


    Here's what I did to assemble the cases:


    I first had this tool built by a buddy who is a welder and machinist. He welded up what was needed, and then turned the nut down on a lathe to clear the rest:






    It's a tube that uses a nut, threaded onto the output shaft, to "pull" the crank ass'y into the right side case. It's actually VERY easy to do.

    Lay the engine case over the crank ass'y:




    Thread on the nut until it bottoms out:




    Thread in the all-thread:




    Slide the tube over and thread on the other nut:




    Tighten it until the crank is seated. Done. Spread Yama-bond over the other half's mating surface and bolt it together:




  3. #23
    Senior Member

    Content on this page requires a newer version of Adobe Flash Player.

    Get Adobe Flash player


    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Posts
    722

    Default

    VERY cool man. I'm definitely following this thread.

    Keep it coming.

  4. #24
    Senior Member

    Content on this page requires a newer version of Adobe Flash Player.

    Get Adobe Flash player


    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Posts
    336

    Default

    Here are shots of lapping the valves to ensure a good, tight seal:






    The seat on the left has been lapped; the one on the right has not. Notice the difference?




    Valves installed:





    After installing the valves, I poured rubbing alcohol into the intake and exhaust ports to ensure that the sealed completely. Alcohol has a very low viscosity and VERY low surface tension, so if there was a leak to be found, it would have shown up.
    Last edited by jbswear; 07-11-2013 at 8:22 PM.

  5. #25
    Senior Member

    Content on this page requires a newer version of Adobe Flash Player.

    Get Adobe Flash player


    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Posts
    336

    Default

    Here's how I went about figuring out which front end to put on it:

    I stacked some blocks of wood under the frame to get the stance I want, with the front of the frame 1.5" higher than the rear. I installed a set of 5* trees in, and ran a broom down through them. To ensure that it ran true, I turned a couple of spacers from wood on my lathe. I located the front wheel where the axle intersected the broom. All my measurements are rough, and the 10" listed for the trail was measured incorrectly.

    I was able to get a complete front end with 3* trees that will work, but they aren't as long as I really want. They'll run for now, though. I'll likely swap them for legs that are 3" longer down the road, as right now my bike lift won't fit under the lower rails.




    Here's the roller mock up:




    Note that this seat isn't going to be used; I have another inbound.

  6. #26
    Senior Member

    Content on this page requires a newer version of Adobe Flash Player.

    Get Adobe Flash player


    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Posts
    336

    Default

    I got a PM about the roller bearings in the transmission. Here's what the installation looked like:





    There are 40 or 44 loose bearings there. Installing them was cake...once I figured out that using heavy bearing grease was the ticket to holding them in place. At first I was worried they wouldn't all fit, but as I pressed the last one in place, they all "clicked" into position and held fast while I put the rest of it together.

    Here's the exterior of the case where those bearings are:




    Interesting note here: No matter WHAT you did, this ALWAYS leaked. It was just a bad bit of engineering...until about five years ago, when an old mechanic figured out how to fix it--he takes a seal, machines a groove on the INSIDE face, and puts a thin rubber o-ring into it. Slide it into place CAREFULLY (to prevent damage to the o-ring) and BAM...no more oil leak. You can just see the groove in this image.

    Keep in mind...he figured this out five years ago.

    Harley stopped producing this transmission...over thirty years ago.


    Quote Originally Posted by MegaDON666 View Post
    Keep it up, Thanks for the updates, Im ready to step up to a shovel and this thread is giving me the confidence to do the work, im learning a lot.

    I'm not going to knock this site at all, but I *highly* recommend heading over to www.shovelhead.us/forum and joining that motley group. The whole forum is dedicated to that one engine...if you have a question, it's been answered a hundred times there.
    Last edited by jbswear; 07-15-2013 at 8:14 AM.

  7. #27
    Senior Member

    Content on this page requires a newer version of Adobe Flash Player.

    Get Adobe Flash player


    Join Date
    May 2010
    Posts
    499

    Default

    Thanks for showing the crank install! For some reason I had heard of side to side "shimming" of the crank was required between the crank snout and bearings?

  8. #28
    Senior Member

    Content on this page requires a newer version of Adobe Flash Player.

    Get Adobe Flash player


    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Posts
    336

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by bobbed06 View Post
    Thanks for showing the crank install! For some reason I had heard of side to side "shimming" of the crank was required between the crank snout and bearings?

    Yes, there is shimming required. It's a bit of a pain to do...you assemble the lower end and then measure end play on the pinion shaft. If it's off, you press it all apart, put in a new shim, and remeasure. The end play is measured by solidly mounting the engine on a stand and then mounting a dial indicator against the end of the pinion shaft. A special "wheel" (looks like a steering wheel) is attached to the drive side of the shaft. Pull it to the left side, zero out the dial, and then push it (the wheel attached to the shaft). Measure the difference.

  9. #29
    Senior Member

    Content on this page requires a newer version of Adobe Flash Player.

    Get Adobe Flash player


    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Posts
    336

    Default

    Dropped off the engine last week at the indy's shop; it'll hopefully be ready by Friday.

    ...and ran into another stumbling block. One of the lower legs on the forks I was given (traded for a few hand made pens, actually) has the fender and caliper bracket mounting bolts broken off in it. The guy that gave it to me didn't know it at the time; one of his employees packed it up for him. I tried drilling them out, but it isn't working.

    Not to fear, though. I have a set of OEM lower legs that will fit perfectly. They're plain aluminum, not chrome. But, while I'm in there swapping the lower legs (and seals) I figure now is the time to get the proper fork tubes--what I have now are too short: my floor jack won't roll under the frame, and that's WITHOUT the engine installed.

    Right now my legs are 35.75" from axle center to very top. I'm thinking 41" will give me the correct ground clearance. I awaiting word from the "experts".

    What do you guys think of adding 4" to the tube length?

  10. #30
    Member

    Content on this page requires a newer version of Adobe Flash Player.

    Get Adobe Flash player


    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    39

    Default

    Great job. Subscribed

  11. #31
    Senior Member

    Content on this page requires a newer version of Adobe Flash Player.

    Get Adobe Flash player


    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Posts
    336

    Default

    I picked up the engine from the shop yesterday. It seems the oil pump rebuild kit I had been given had the wrong sized parts in it; the shop got it sorted and it's now assembled and good to go. I watched a few YouTube videos in the interim and learned how to disassemble conventional fork legs. I had NO clue it was actually so friggin' easy. I've ordered new seals for the lowers and will likely assemble them in the coming weeks; going on vacation soon and won't be able to finish until after that's done.

    I'll just use the legs I have now until I get the whole bike built to see if the length will work. No being able to roll the lift under the bike isn't that big a deal right now.

  12. #32
    Senior Member

    Content on this page requires a newer version of Adobe Flash Player.

    Get Adobe Flash player


    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    1,878

    Default

    You'll certainly want a bit more ground clearance. The only thing is that an extra 4" with that amount of rake wont lift it up an extra 4".

  13. #33
    Senior Member

    Content on this page requires a newer version of Adobe Flash Player.

    Get Adobe Flash player


    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Posts
    336

    Default

    Oh, I know. I'm not looking for an additional 4" of clearance. I'll do the math once the engine and transmission in place.

  14. #34
    Senior Member

    Content on this page requires a newer version of Adobe Flash Player.

    Get Adobe Flash player


    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Posts
    336

    Default

    Aside from over running your budget...or taking forever...or breaking expensive parts because you're a dumbass and don't pay attention to proper orientation...you know what ELSE really screws with your build?

    Buying the wrong parts because you don't know what the eff you're doing.

    Exhibit A:










    Apparently I need "older" style rotors to match my "older" style hub. I'm guessing that means a certain year range. So...I'm waiting on some Harley gurus to get back to me to let me know which year range of rotors I need.


  15. #35
    Senior Member

    Content on this page requires a newer version of Adobe Flash Player.

    Get Adobe Flash player


    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Posts
    722

    Default

    You need a 99 and older rotor. Older ones had a 2" bore, 2000 up had 2.5" center bore. Also, front rotors have different bolt sizes then the rear. I think the rears are 7/16" and the fronts are 3/8".

  16. #36
    Senior Member

    Content on this page requires a newer version of Adobe Flash Player.

    Get Adobe Flash player


    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Posts
    336

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by TheSandman View Post
    You need a 99 and older rotor. Older ones had a 2" bore, 2000 up had 2.5" center bore. Also, front rotors have different bolt sizes then the rear. I think the rears are 7/16" and the fronts are 3/8".

    Yup...I know that *now*. Dangit!


  17. #37
    Senior Member

    Content on this page requires a newer version of Adobe Flash Player.

    Get Adobe Flash player


    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Posts
    722

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by jbswear View Post
    Yup...I know that *now*. Dangit!

    I've ran late model rotors on early model hubs with no issues. It was temporary but still worked.

  18. #38
    Senior Member

    Content on this page requires a newer version of Adobe Flash Player.

    Get Adobe Flash player


    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Posts
    722

    Default

    For future referenece, hub bearings also changed from a bearing and race type
    To a sealed bearing. Same time as the rotor changed. Hub dimensions also changed.

  19. #39
    Senior Member

    Content on this page requires a newer version of Adobe Flash Player.

    Get Adobe Flash player


    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Posts
    336

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by TheSandman View Post
    For future referenece, hub bearings also changed from a bearing and race type
    To a sealed bearing. Same time as the rotor changed. Hub dimensions also changed.

    Looking at the images I put up, is there a way to tell which this has?

  20. #40
    Senior Member

    Content on this page requires a newer version of Adobe Flash Player.

    Get Adobe Flash player


    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Posts
    722

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by jbswear View Post
    Looking at the images I put up, is there a way to tell which this has?
    Is it a steel hub or forged aluminum? It's definitely a bearing/race style bearing. You take the c-clip and pull the dust shield and the bearings under that.

    I don't know the exact years but it looks like a stock shovelhead style steel hub. JUST from the pics you took.

    I could probably look it up in my vtwin catalog when I get home.

Share This



Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Log in

Log in