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    Default Snapped my clutch pedal off, need advice.

    So, I made a bonehead mistake and clipped a concrete stoop on a sidewalk the other night and snapped my left side pedal off where it mounts to the rocker arm. I have a few questions: First off, is that even what the part is called, the rocker arm? Second, is there anywhere that I can get a replacement without buying a complete set of forwards? I have scoured Ebay and the classifieds with no luck, but I figured someone out there must know something.


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    year and make of the bike?

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    http://www.richscyclecenter.com/
    http://www.cscycle.com/
    Ask these guys if they have any used parts. Go in and ask with your broken piece.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ominous View Post
    year and make of the bike?
    2003 sportster 883

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    If you can not get replacement I would try that: find somebody with a welder and a lathe. Drill a 1/4" hole thru both parts. Machine both ends 30° angle were broke to prepare for welding. Slide both parts over a 1/4 rod or screw to line them up and weld them together. Machine over weld to correct diameter. Done!

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    Before doing anything to the part, find the welder and ask him if he wants it prepped and would that save you any money.

    Some welders might, for example, chamfer it on a grinder then lay it in a V-block or piece of angle, tack it on one side, verify straightness, tack 180°out from that, verify straightness, tack 90° out from that, verify straightness, tack, then weld it around.

    Every welder has different preferences. I've seen one who could weld the proverbial cat's ass to a plate glass window do multiple shaft repairs as described above.

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    is the manufacturer or distributor still in business?

    I saw where a guy helping at a shop didnt use loctite, the foot shifter fell off on customers bike, customer didnt hear it, & couldnt find it, shop owner contacted supplier & believe it or not they was able to replace it, they were very expensive forward controls that had just been installed, & it fell off on the customers ride home of about 50 miles, many times parts come up missing and manufactures have to replace parts, so it cant hurt to ask?

    Randy

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    Quote Originally Posted by GermanG View Post
    If you can not get replacement I would try that: find somebody with a welder and a lathe. Drill a 1/4" hole thru both parts. Machine both ends 30° angle were broke to prepare for welding. Slide both parts over a 1/4 rod or screw to line them up and weld them together. Machine over weld to correct diameter. Done!
    Fantastic idea. Thanks. Do you think it would hold up well?

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    I'm not even sure the manufacturer of the controls.

    Quote Originally Posted by BSAshovel View Post
    is the manufacturer or distributor still in business?

    I saw where a guy helping at a shop didnt use loctite, the foot shifter fell off on customers bike, customer didnt hear it, & couldnt find it, shop owner contacted supplier & believe it or not they was able to replace it, they were very expensive forward controls that had just been installed, & it fell off on the customers ride home of about 50 miles, many times parts come up missing and manufactures have to replace parts, so it cant hurt to ask?

    Randy

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    So, I had Cap over at CNS Cycles weld the clutch pedal back to the rocker arm piece that engages the clutch. I don't know what happened, but things don't line up like they used to. My foot is basically completely vertical in the resting position and know when I engage the clutch my heel is all the way of the peg. Basically thinking I'm up shit's creek at this point and am guessing I'm gonna have to buy a new set of forwards. Fuck.
    '

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    Should have followed the posted repair advice!

    Your problem is called "clocking", as in "clock position".

    If you weld items like that together you need to find and preserve the original relationship of the ends or in that case the lever and the tab by punch-marking them outside where you are going to weld so you have alignment marks, but you still lose adjustability.

    Food for thought:

    Since most shift levers are stock diameter the shifter shaft is likely stock diameter and other forward parts could fit.

    The special part isn't the shift lever. If it were mine, I'd carefully cut off the old lever, then buy a new lever (you can unscrew the peg so they match).

    Take your amputated shaft and find a matching diameter shaft longer than you will need.
    Take your old shaft and measure it plus the length of shaft that's "inside" the old shift lever.

    Remove the grease nipple, and, using a drill press, drill out the old shaft from the tab using a drill bit the diameter of the shaft.

    You then have a shift lever, and the right tab for your bike.


    I don't have one handy, but a long shifter shaft you can cut down could be out of an Ironhead Sportster since it reaches much longer than your original.

    I would slide the new shifter shaft through the "tab", the mount, then bolt on the shift lever. The places to cut and weld will be obvious, and you'll have a nice clean shaft so you can adjust lever position where it needs to be.

    Find a shaft that will work BEFORE buying the shift lever to match the shaft. Measure diameters with a caliper.


    If there are minor diameter differences you could drill and ream your forward for a bushing, but it looks like it won't need one.

    It's not much work and much simpler than it reads to do. Your only welds would face the engine so no cosmetic issues.

    If you have someone do the work, print this thread for reference because it beats explaining it verbally.

    Example pic found on internet. Sporties had various styles but you get the idea.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails shaft.jpg  
    Last edited by farmall; 06-11-2013 at 8:40 PM.

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    Thanks for the advice, Farmall. It was pretty easy to identify where the two pieces needed to line up at, so I'm not sure what happened. I was searching the web tonight and I somehow stumbled across an inner shift lever at jpcycles. http://www.jpcycles.com/product/541-344 Would I be able to order that and get a new shift lever and screw my old peg into it?

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    I'd try to match the layout of what you have already.

    Your lever sort of resembles this style, search "harley shifter" on Ebay for a wide variety of example pics:

    http://www.ebay.com/itm/Harley-after...-/230994118009

    which would clamp to an appropriate year shifter shaft of the style shown in my previous pic.

    The shifter must fit the shifter shaft, and the shaft must fit the bore of the forward control mount.


    MEASURE your existing parts. Post the shaft DIAMETER, and approximate LENGTH. Measure the mount width where the shaft goes through it.

    If you get a "clamp on" (non-splined) shift lever you can easily have a machine shop turn a short section of rod stock to replace the old shaft and weld that in place, but shifter shafts are likely cheaper than doing it that way. and easy to cut.

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    http://www.chopcult.com/MrSmith391/classifieds/61339/ Found these here in the classifieds. Pretty sure these are the same model and fitment as mine, they look dead on similar. In negotiations for the inner shift lever and shifter arm, let me know if there is anything you see that I don't that may pose an issue.

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    Looks like it would work, maybe make an offer on the set so you have spares since breaking up sets reduces their value.

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    So I got some parts in from a fellow member. The new inner shift lever seems the tiniest bit bigger, and I had to hit it in with a rubber mallet. Is it necessary to put some grease in the new assemly? I don't have much play in between the clutch being engaged and take off like I had before, do you guys think I need to re-adjust my clutch? It's ride-able, but feels different then before the mishap.

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    You want free movement, so I'd grease it and make sure it doesn't "stick". Bushings and bearing require lube. Nobody likes a dry hole...

    You might have to pull the part and polish the shaft region where it runs in the bushing using a strip of emery cloth or of sandpaper (stick duct or nylon strapping tape to the back of the sandpaper to make it durable).

    So long as you do have play and there is not pressure loading the release mechanism all the time, you are good. A little geometry change would account for less play.
    Last edited by farmall; 06-24-2013 at 6:44 PM.

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