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  1. #1
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    Default How to align rear wheel/transmission

    Having some issues getting everything to line up and could use a little help. Where do you start? Should I line up the trans loosely in place then center the rear wheel? What are some things I should watch out for? I'm running a EVO motor with a Ultima trans and its a 180 tire. Thanks for the help guys sorry if there isn't enough info but any help is appreciated.

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    Quote Originally Posted by deelux View Post
    Having some issues getting everything to line up and could use a little help. Where do you start? Should I line up the trans loosely in place then center the rear wheel? What are some things I should watch out for? I'm running a EVO motor with a Ultima trans and its a 180 tire. Thanks for the help guys sorry if there isn't enough info but any help is appreciated.
    The thing is, what you are really trying to line up isn't the transmission and the tire. What you want is for your sprockets to line up that way your chain/belte run true. In your case you will have to line up for your drive from the engine to the transmission and from the transmission to the rear wheel. Start from engine to transmission and then adjust rear wheel accordingly. Your rear wheel doesn't have to be centered in the frame or fender there is a tolerance, I think it's 3/8" as long as your chain/belt are running true your good.

    Sent from my SCH-R720 using Tapatalk 2

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    Sound info cowboy, pay heed to his instructions...............

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    Thanks LinkBelt that makes a lot of sense. How do I check the that the motor and trans are lined up correctly? Do you just run a straight edge across the sprocket on the trans and the stator of the motor? Then do you straight edge the trans sprocket to the rear sprocket?

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    Quote Originally Posted by deelux View Post
    Thanks LinkBelt that makes a lot of sense. How do I check the that the motor and trans are lined up correctly? Do you just run a straight edge across the sprocket on the trans and the stator of the motor? Then do you straight edge the trans sprocket to the rear sprocket?
    Yes, that should work with what you're working with.

    Sent from my SCH-R720 using Tapatalk 2

  6. #6
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    I was always told just the opposite, very first step was to center your rear wheel with the backbone of your frame. Lay your tire and wheel flat on the floor, put a straightedge across the tire, measure from the floor up to the straightedge, then place a piece of masking tire on the tire and mark a line with a pen in the exact center. Now mount your tire and wheel in your frame with no axle spacers in place. Next is to tape a piece of string in the center of your neck stem and run the string right down the center of your backbone and slide your wheel left or right so the mark you previously made on your tire is straight with the center of your backbone. Now that your wheel is centered, I usually adjust the rear belt pulley or sprocket so that the chain or belt will just clear the tire. This is done with pulley or sprocket spacers if needed. Now move to the transmission, it can be moved left to right with an offset trans plate or if just a little is needed to align your sprockets, use an offset sprocket. Now to the motor, which you know cant be moved left or right, you will use shims or offset sprockets or pulley if running a belt drive.
    Im sure this is different than the way some people do it, but years ago I had a dude that had built several bikes tell me to start by centering the rear wheel first, then move forward from their. Hope this helps a little and I didnt confuse you too bad.

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    Quote Originally Posted by thehawgshop View Post
    I was always told just the opposite, very first step was to center your rear wheel with the backbone of your frame.
    There's no one specific method. In the event things don't align, the method used depends on whether you'd prefer to align to the sprockets and modify the rim offset, or align the wheel to the frame centerline and design/fabricate a spacer for the sprocket. Either method is acceptable.Generally, if I'm starting with a bare hub I'll center the sprockets and then lace the wheel with the proper offset to center it in the frame. If I'm spacing an assembled wheel I'll center the wheel and space the sprocket as required. Of course, the first method is not an option with a cast wheel.

    Bob

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    Still, either way you do it your objective is to align the sprockets. Your chain/belt must run true. If not you are going to throw or break your chain/belt.

    Sent from my SCH-R720 using Tapatalk 2

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    Absolutely. Some wheels are problematic in that regard because their sprockets do not readily accept spacers if the sprocket needs to move outboard. That would include practically all drum brake rear wheels such as pre-disk Triumphs and Harleys where the sprocket mounts on the drum. Disk brake hubs have a lot more flexibility since the sprocket is a "stand alone" component.

    Bob
    Last edited by bobscogin; 01-02-2013 at 9:51 PM.

  10. #10
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    Default Calling Irish Rich!!!!

    Honestly...you need to get Irish Rich to chime in on this.

    Here is how I do it: The rear tire needs to be centered in the chassis. All other adjustments are based off of that when I build a bike. That is why builders have lathes, etc to machine these parts. Start at the back of the bike and attach a string to the center of the frame or front end (I use the headlamp hole since that is normally dead center) at the front. I eyeball my initial measurement (if it looks straight it usually is). Once that is done I measure, make adjustments and build the initial rear wheel spacers. This is where some builders set up their rear brake. I don't. Once the drivetrain is lined up I build the brake side and finish machine the wheel spacers before final mock up.

    This is due to the fact that the number one most important thing is that the engine, trans and rear wheel are centered. I have had to weld up engine holes and re-drill them (I am certain Rich has too) but never assume that the person that worked on the frame before you did their job right. You need to check ALL dimensions. Once the initial wheel spacers are built and I am satisfied with the rear tire alignment I move to the trans (with the primary and engine attached), trans sprocket (any applicable spacers) and the rear sprocket and applicable spacers.

    I hope that helps

  11. #11
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    If you are using a motor plate between motor & trans that will align them.As long as motor & trans are centered in frame & not offset for wide rear wheel you shouldn't have to space motor sprocket or clutch but you will need to check with straight edge,if you already done what other said about centering wheel & made spacer you can take a string & tie around trans spocket teeth where the string will lay flat against flat side of sprocket & pull back so it lay against side of wheel sprocket that will give you a idea if you need to space rear sprocket.

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