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  1. #1
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    Default Fiberglass Seatpan

    Im sure a few of you have made one or two. Any advice? Im attempting to make one this weekend because I can't find anything I like and making shit is way cooler than buying it. I've never done any fiberglass work before. Any tips or tricks I should know?

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    use weave not chop mat, if you are making to it fit on the frame rails do it on the bike so it fits snugly, mask and paper everything below it on each side and about 2 feet in front of and behind it. Make sure you saturate the glass with resin very well and push out all air bubbles. One of the most common mistakes i see is people think " too much hardener cant be that bad" and then their part end up failing because of it. So add some hardener but not too much, Its better to have to put it under a heat lamp and wait awhile than to add too much hardener.

  3. #3
    BigMikeOlley
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    http://www.jeffreyphipps.com/seat_pans.htm

    I've made 3-4 this way, Also I use turtle wax for release on the aluminum tape. Glass matt for sure, definately buy a box of disposable gloves.

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    Things learned the hard way:

    a)Bike level, with more masking then you need...a lot more

    b)Don't forget to place any mounts into the glass as you build up the seat pan.

    c) PART-A and PART-A do not make for good seat pans. I recomend using part A and part B for better results..

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    Not to hijack...but I think I'll ask it here rather than start a new thread.


    What is the best method to attach the seat cover to the fiberglass pan? Pop rivets like you use on a metal pan?

    Thanks.
    Brian

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    I used pop rivits, I also placed strips of sheet metal in the glass when I was building it up so the rivits had something to grab.

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    good idea about the metal strips. Other than sticking to its self, fiberglass and resin bond to raw steel better than anything else

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    Thanks for the advice guys.

    I thought about using pop rivets but I wanted to try this method.

    http://www.chopcult.com/forum/showthread.php?t=1590

    I know an awesome leather repair guy I think I could get it stitched pretty reasonably.

  9. #9
    NHMike
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    I'm waiting to get my new tires on so I can adjust my rear fender, and then I'm trying one myself. I've watched this video a few times. Between that and the link above I feel pretty confident it'll come together.


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    What is the story with the 3 inch squares he used? Why not just go with full sheets of mat? Does it give it more strength with the overlap? That's my guess but just checking...

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    It's a lot easier to work with the smaller squares then one big piece, it lets you get it flatter with less wrinkles in it, and it makes it a little stronger over lapping.

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    + 1 on the easier to work with.
    As soon as you bust out the resin, that nice big single piece becomes a bear to get to cooperate. It's much easier to lay and adjust multiple smaller pieces.

    Remember though, the strength comes from the mat, not the resin. Adding a shit-load of extra resin does not make for a better/stronger part. I've had good luck using bondo spreaders as squeegees to remove as much excess resin as possible.

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    Gotcha. Good to know.

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    These guys sell everything you could ever need.

    http://www.shopmaninc.com/

    I have a little 3" roller that has little ribs on it for getting all the bubbles out and getting it real flat. Wet out the sheet on a piece of tinfoil on the bench, use a paintbrush to get it all saturated, then just pick up the tinfoil, lay it in place, and pull off the foil. Use the turtlewax anywhere where you don't want resin to stick, don't buff it off just apply it and leave it. It's messy shit, mask everything and work over an old sheet. Only mix small batches of resin, large batches will cook off pretty quick. An "L" weave cloth is sometimes a little nicer if you have lots of curves to follow. Lots of thin sheets is better than a few thick. Work with gloves, high quality resin can cause an epoxy allergy that will stay with you for life. West marine is good shit but expensive. Many marine supply stores have what you need but buying online is way cheaper.

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    Are epoxy resins too flexible for seat pans? Is polyester too brittle?

    Thoughts?

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    They both have about the same characteristics, epoxy resins are a little more forgiving in the amount of time you have to work with them, you can get different hardeners for the epoxies, i.e. a slow cure, medium cure and a fast cure. Epoxy resins will stick to polyester resins but not the other way around. polyester resins are usually about half the cost of epoxy, harder to control the cure times, you got to work fast and will usually lose a good portion of the batch you mix up, and if you really want to have fun mix twice the needed hardener in em and watch it spontaneously combust.

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    about to try this out myself. all these videos have been great on the process except none really talk about mounting solutions.

    any of you guys care to share the route you went? would you recommend anything?

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    As far as mounting - you can add metal into the fiberglass -take steel flat stock weld your studs to it and incorporate it right into the seat your making

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    awesome, that is what i was thinking. wasn't sure if the fiberglass would be too brittle for that but i'm gonna give it a try. i read it bonds to raw steel pretty well.

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    Yeah it will bond fine , you can also carriage bolt through the fiberglass seat and then through metal - like on fiberglass car body mount areas . I love fiberglass , you can do so much cool shit with it..

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