CHOP CULT HOME
Email Password
Search
Page 1 of 3 123 Last
  1. #1
    Junior Member

    Content on this page requires a newer version of Adobe Flash Player.

    Get Adobe Flash player


    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    10

    Default Want to start a first time bobber project!

    This is a very noob question. But the firs thing I want to ask is how do you choose what you want to bob out what are some of the MAJOR things YOU looked for in a possible bike purchase? Do I look for an old bike with a running motor? or purchase a motor during the rebuild? haha I sound like a 100% novice sorry. I dont know pretty much anything about how to start off but I do plan on getting all the possible reading material I can. If anyone could give me some pointers in what kind of reading guides that you possibly used or any tips that would be fantastic.

    Also, I wanted to ask what it would possibly cost to go from A to Z. I know this varies extremely, I was hoping to stay under $5k if thats even possible.

    I know this topic could go on for MONTHS lol but if i could get some good reading suggestions that would be awesome for now!

    Thank you all for the advice!
    Last edited by Shibider12; 01-29-2012 at 11:27 PM.

  2. #2
    NHMike
    Guest

    Default First off, Welcome.

    If you're building a Bobber, just make sure you have a few cans of flat black spray paint. Lol

  3. #3
    Senior Member

    Content on this page requires a newer version of Adobe Flash Player.

    Get Adobe Flash player


    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Posts
    1,146

    Default

    best place to start is with a running bike, be it old or new. just remember there are a lot more wires and shit on new bikes witch makes it harder to give that nice clean look you get from an older bike, preferably one with a points style ignition.
    then you have to look at what your spending 5k might be a little shallow to make a badass chop from a newer bike but you can pick up 80s map bikes for around 1k just about all day, most of the time running.and most of the time its worth the few hundred dollar difference between a running bike and a non running bike, because its just one less headache you will have when you get home, you can just get started knowing that everything works.
    as far as literature goes, you have all the information and inspiration you will need right here on chop cult. but its not a bad idea to find a more technical geared site for whatever type bike you get. an example is if you got a suzuki you would wanna check out thegsresources.
    but just remember, the more you build yourself instead of buying, the better you will feel about the finished project.
    welcome to 33

  4. #4
    Senior Member

    Content on this page requires a newer version of Adobe Flash Player.

    Get Adobe Flash player


    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Posts
    1,146

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by NHMike View Post
    If you're building a Bobber, just make sure you have a few cans of flat black spray paint. Lol

  5. #5
    Senior Member

    Content on this page requires a newer version of Adobe Flash Player.

    Get Adobe Flash player


    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    1,130

    Default

    You buy an Indian or Harley (SV, khuckle or pan, it matters not), take off the front mudguard and half of the rear and then stop. Done.

  6. #6
    Senior Member

    Content on this page requires a newer version of Adobe Flash Player.

    Get Adobe Flash player


    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Posts
    2,412

    Default

    I agree with a lot of what Poon said. My thoughts are, figure out what you want to build (ie: Sportster, Yamaha, Honda etc.) first and then start looking at how much money you have to spend now, vs. how much you'll want to put into it total. It's entirely possible to spend $5K on a decent build, but there are different ways to go about it.

    For the most part, you can find a really good score on a running bike up front, or, you must be willing to piece one together slowly over time, using ChopCult, CraigsList or other resources to store away parts at your own pace. A lot of people don't have $5K in liquid assets at one time, like me, which is why I chose to pick up a stock Sporty frame/basket of parts recently to begin my build. When money allows I can pick up more parts and Sporty parts are the most abundant on CC. Total budget for my build? Don't know. It's early on, so we'll see.

    It can be done easily for $5K, but don't focus so much on the price. Focus on what you want to build (realistically) and then figure out how to get there.

  7. #7
    Senior Member

    Content on this page requires a newer version of Adobe Flash Player.

    Get Adobe Flash player


    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Posts
    2,412

    Default

    Oh, and here are a few other thoughts that I just had related to this, particularly if you "Frankenstein" a bike together like I'm doing:

    1. No, you don't have all of the tools that you'll need to put one together. Figure this into your budget. Within a couple of weeks, you'll realize that you need tools that you figured only "professional shops" would ever use. Even if you visit Harbor Freight, these will add up quickly.

    2. No, it won't simply bolt together, no matter what Paul Jr. can do in a TV hour.

    3. Yes, paint, powdercoat and chrome are expensive; more so than you thought. Also, they aren't important right now. Focus on putting together a running bike, not a pretty one.

    4. No, you aren't going to be able to have your new bike build up and rolling in 6 weeks, unless you are unemployed and independently wealthy.

    5. Yes, you are going to have to consult people with questions, such as when you aren't sure whether your frame uses internal, pressed-in neck bearing races or external bearing cups etc. So, meet people with some expertise.

    6. Yes, you should buy/obtain reading material such as Clymer manuals, parts guides or other shop manuals for your bike and become familiar with them before you start turning a wrench. You'll save yourself some time so that you don't have to go back and do things right the 2nd time plus, you won't be as likely to buy parts that won't work for you and then have to buy the right parts the 2nd time.

  8. #8
    Senior Member

    Content on this page requires a newer version of Adobe Flash Player.

    Get Adobe Flash player


    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Posts
    2,171

    Default

    Get a shovelhead. Parts are everywhere, most crap is interchangeable. They are easy to work on. Also, if you get a jap or brit bike you will have to search a lot harder for parts. And if you get stuck, tons of people can/ will help you out. Plus

    Shovels are just rad.

  9. #9
    starwolf
    Guest

    Default

    First off, welcome to the CC ! I think most have made some good points here so far. This is what I would recommend. Find a bike for around $1,000 -1,500, be prepared to spend about the same or even more on parts. I recommend older bikes as they don't have as much wiring,and generally are much more appealing to the eye. Preferably this bike will run, tho not always. Make sure its not frozen/ locked up(as in the motor will freely turn over via the kick starter, and it will shift through all gears) This is usually a good sign that not much is wrong internally. something to look for is matching engine & frame #'s, this usually means it has not been molested, and may make registration go a bit easier. Don't worry too much about things like flat tires, bent rims, missing bolts,no seat, rusty gas tank, busted headlight, no speedo or tach, you will obtain these items over the course of the build, think of it sort of like a treasure hunt. You can come up with some really killer shit for not much money if you use your imagination/ingenuity a bit. Get an original service manual and a parts manual for whatever bike you come up with. You can print these off from any public library. Haynes & Clymber manuals usually do not go into as much detail as the original manual,though they can still be helpful. If you get stumped or stuck on something there are many skilled, knowledgeable folks right here on the 33, all you have to do is ask, our advice is free,(though sometimes a touch sarcastic) Some things you may need physical assistance with for example if you don't have a welder/don't know how to weld, you will need to find someone in your local area that can provide these services to you for a reasonable price. Parts are usually not too difficult to find, if you know where to look for them. (even if you have a bastard bike like my 3 Cylinder Triumph)
    Best of luck with whatever you end up with, post lot's of pics of what your doing with it, there is even a chance someone here may see something that might not be to the best of your interest,safety wise, and will let you know about it. Keep in mind too, the only stupid question ,is the unasked question. Again,welcome to CC !
    Last edited by starwolf; 01-30-2012 at 7:23 AM.

  10. #10
    Senior Member

    Content on this page requires a newer version of Adobe Flash Player.

    Get Adobe Flash player


    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    1,290

    Default

    i have a few questions for you.
    1,how thick is your wallet?
    2,do you have any mechanical knowledge?
    3,can you use an angle grinder with flap disks and cut offs?
    4,can you weld?

    a good starting point would be a decent running older bike. dont get some obscure shit that noone else rides or works on.
    but if you get a good decent running bike, you wont learn how to work on your engine, and that (to me) should be the base of any chop. knowing your bike inside and out.

    on your original post you said,
    "purchase a motor during the rebuild"
    this sometimes comes up with new guys (im not being a dick) but you have to really think about that.

    what would you be rebuilding if you dont have a motor? most likely the motor that you purchase will come in the frame. and that is the base of MOST builds. if you dont have a motor, you cant build a frame, without a frame you cant build............. fender, seat, sissy, lincense plate brackets, headlight, tail light, foot controls, battery tray, linkages, brakes....

    cant do any wiring, or really look into what is involved in your charging system/ignition system/starting system/other lights and shit if you dont have a motor to base your reading off of.

    find a bike that has a good following for your first bike. xs650's for example are discussed greatly here, and there are a few xs650 specific forums. same goes for harleys and hondas that i know of.

    availability of parts. i have a xs650. nothing is worse than needing a gasket or something and not being able to get it. we (xs guys) have a few places that we can readily go to online and over the phone to get almost anything that we would ever need for replacement parts for our engines.

    cost.....
    for me that came in waves. i got my bike, had a plan for the welding and shit. made a couple of big orders to get my engine sound and i thought everything was going to be smooth sailing from there. then my buddy that welds get switched to 12/6's and that plan goes out the window. then i realize that i only scratched the surface on my orders to get my bike running. which brings me to my next point. ive gotten to the "just want to get it running" phase a few times. then you have to finish your foot controls and rear brake linkages. then you realize that a rear only drum isnt going to cut it, so you have to get parts for your front brake. then you wire something wrong and you fry your coil and a bunch of other shit. then you got to rebuild your carbs two or ten times. then you need to upgrade your ignition, then your charging system....

    sorry if this seems dickish, but unless your shitting hundred dollar bills, its going to be a long and painful process. nothing will be easy. i was sitting in your spot thinking the same shit your thinking not that long ago.

    you get to a point where the learning and waiting becomes part of the process. its nothing compared to actually riding, but it makes everything that you went through that much better when you do finally get to ride down your street.

    ill leave you with one last little tidbit that ive said before, and ill pry say again

    whatever your time frame for your build, double it.
    whatever you think is reasonable to spend, at least double it. cant weld? dont have a friend that can? double your double. that one little tab that you forgot about will come back to haunt you.

  11. #11
    ARBY
    Guest

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by NeoDutch View Post
    You buy an Indian or Harley (SV, khuckle or pan, it matters not), take off the front mudguard and half of the rear and then stop. Done.

    At last, somebody who knows what the hell they're talking about!

  12. #12
    Senior Member

    Content on this page requires a newer version of Adobe Flash Player.

    Get Adobe Flash player


    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    1,290

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ARBY View Post
    At last, somebody who knows what the hell they're talking about!
    blah blah blah

    new guy said the sacred word 'bobber' and ever feels the need to prove they know harley's and indians history. get over it, the guys that feel the need to prove what a 'real bobbers' is are more annoying than a guy that just got off a hardknock website and wants to spray everything with walmart flat black and want to know where to get whitewalls and red rims.

  13. #13
    livingdeadmc
    Guest

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by cros36 View Post
    blah blah blah

    new guy said the sacred word 'bobber' and ever feels the need to prove they know harley's and indians history. get over it, the guys that feel the need to prove what a 'real bobbers' is are more annoying than a guy that just got off a hardknock website and wants to spray everything with walmart flat black and want to know where to get whitewalls and red rims.
    Hahahahaha my bobber definition could beat up your bobber definition

  14. #14
    Senior Member

    Content on this page requires a newer version of Adobe Flash Player.

    Get Adobe Flash player


    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Posts
    2,663

    Default

    heres a pic of my bobber

    took all the crap off it

  15. #15
    livingdeadmc
    Guest

    Default

    Brah! your so "bobber" now!

  16. #16
    Member

    Content on this page requires a newer version of Adobe Flash Player.

    Get Adobe Flash player


    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    96

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Nosebleed View Post

    3. Yes, paint, powdercoat and chrome are expensive; more so than you thought. Also, they aren't important right now. Focus on putting together a running bike, not a pretty one.

    6. Yes, you should buy/obtain reading material such as Clymer manuals, parts guides or other shop manuals for your bike and become familiar with them before you start turning a wrench. You'll save yourself some time so that you don't have to go back and do things right the 2nd time plus, you won't be as likely to buy parts that won't work for you and then have to buy the right parts the 2nd time.
    These probably the most important pieces of advise you can get. Don't blow your money on crap you don't need.

    If you've got a fat wallet, well, have fun. If you're like evereyone else that doesn't, you'll figure out real quick that your project came to a screeching halt and never got finished because you have a shitload of shiny crap that doesn't make your bike work and a bunch of crap you can't use.

  17. #17
    Senior Member

    Content on this page requires a newer version of Adobe Flash Player.

    Get Adobe Flash player


    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Posts
    2,663

    Default

    heres another one i "bobbed" out

  18. #18
    Senior Member

    Content on this page requires a newer version of Adobe Flash Player.

    Get Adobe Flash player


    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Posts
    2,663

    Default

    and here is a pic of me and my mom. its her birthday today

  19. #19
    Senior Member

    Content on this page requires a newer version of Adobe Flash Player.

    Get Adobe Flash player


    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Posts
    5,468

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by beanhead78 View Post
    heres a pic of my bobber

    .....

    took all the crap off it
    Hahahahahaha!

    That's fucking bobbed to the max! I never seen nobody bob off their engine and wheels!

  20. #20
    Senior Member

    Content on this page requires a newer version of Adobe Flash Player.

    Get Adobe Flash player


    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Posts
    2,663

    Default

    heres another one im working on. still need to take more shit off it

Share This



Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Log in

Log in