CHOP CULT HOME
Email Password
Search
Page 1 of 5 123 ... Last
  1. #1
    Senior Member

    Content on this page requires a newer version of Adobe Flash Player.

    Get Adobe Flash player


    Join Date
    May 2010
    Posts
    940

    Default TECH: Chain Conversion for Sportster

    Seems a lot of talk and questions about this. Here is how I did this on my 96 Sportster 1200, but it should apply to most belt-drive evo Sportsters, with minor variations/part numbers.

    There are companies selling "kits" and such, but ordering the parts individually should save you some serious cash, and it will also allow you to tailor your gear ratio and chain pitch to your preferences.

    Here is what I used..........

    *5-speed trans sprocket spacer HD #33334-85 ------------$20
    *Mainshaft Oil Seal HD #12050 -----------$4
    *Quad Oil Seal HD# 11165------------$3
    *Renthal R3-2 O-Ring 520 chain X114 links --------$80
    *48 Tooth 520 rear sprocket Chris Products (PBI ?)#205348 ------------$60
    *21 Tooth 520 front sprocket PBI # 277X-21-----------$35

    Total-----$202 shipped give or take

    Note I decided to go with 520 pitch chain, not the standard 530. There are arguments on both sides for either choice, but I wanted the lighter 520 set-up. Also, your choice in front/rear sprocket teeth will be a personal choice. I ride in traffic a lot, not much freeway. So my choice was geared towards off the line acceleration, not low freeway RPM's.

    Now you may be able to get that all for a little more or less cash, but this is what I paid...shipped. Got most of it through J&P, the chain through MCSuperstore, and the 21t sprocket on ebay. Your local HD dealer should stock the oil seals and spacer. Beats the hell out of the overpriced kit. You also will need:

    *Red and Blue Loctite
    *Chain Breaker/Riveter
    *Misc. mechanics hand tools
    *Jack
    *Factory Service Manual
    *Torque Wrench
    *1-7/8" Socket for Transmission Nut. I did not have one that size, ended up finding an impact socket for $20 shipped through Amazon. (it's 3/4" drive as well, so be prepared)

    This took me a few hours on a Sunday afternoon.


    Supplies. (that little bag in the upper left corner is a clip-style master link, just incase)......


    Put your bike with the front wheel up against a wall or something immovable. This is so when you are taking the nut off the mainshaft, it will give you leverage......


    Take off the sprocket cover and bungee it up out of the way....



    Take the lock ring off your old pulley....


    No pic of the wrench and huge socket "in action", but I got my impact driver and took off the giant nut. It is REALLY on there. Remember, it is REVERSE THREADED! You can use a breaker bar and heat if you don't have a driver. I got it loose with the driver and finished up with my hand ratchet.....


    Old pulley, lockring, and nut....


    Bare mainshaft (still with the old spacer and seal).....


    If the bike is not lifted yet, do it now so you can take the rear wheel off. I got one of these easy lift things that pivots on the swingarm. Makes maintenance much easier than using my clunky m/c jack....


    Axle out, wheel off. Start taking off the pulley. 5 gallon bucket or milk crate are both good choices. While the wheel is off, you need to take off the old belt. You can cut it off in seconds, but I don't like wasting parts, so I choose to slip the right shock off and pull the belt....


    New sprocket. Weighs less than a pound. Nice....


    Put new sprocket on the wheel. Loctite it up. Torque to specs (55-65 ft-lb)....


    The goods you need for the next step. New spacer, oil seal, quad-ring seal (looks like an o-ring), nut, and the sprocket. I ended up not needing the quad-ring seal (my old one was in perfect shape)....


    A side-by-side of the old spacer and new one (longer).....


    Here's how I got the oil seal out. Took a wood screw, and CAREFULLY screwed in just the tip. Gave me just enough leverage to yank out the old seal, without digging at it with a pick or screwdriver.....


    Look at my balls...


    Now, this is where you would put in the Quad ring seal. On the mainshaft, before the spacer. But mine was great looking still, and the new one I got was a bit flat on one part. I made the executive decision to roll with the old one.
    New spacer going in. Bevel goes TOWARDS transmission....


    I lubed up all the oil rings edges with wheel bearing grease, so it would slide in real easy. Then I GENTLY tapped all around the circumference with a soft rubber mallet.....


    Put the sprocket on....


    Now check alignment with something true. You can't have ANY deviation.....


    Put your chain on. Get the breaker out, and line it up. Before you cut any off, adjust your axle so it sits as far forward as possible. Then line it all up, and decide how much needs to come off. Be conservative. You can always cut more later if you need. I went with 3 links. Making my bike 111 links total needed. Yours may vary......


    Now, the Renthal chain uses a rivet link to close it off. I do not own a rivet adapter for my chain breaker, but it is simple to rig up something. Take a hard screw that will fit inside the hollow "pin-ejector" slot. Stainless works.....



    Take the breaker and put it in the same way you would break a chain, and use the pin driver to stamp the head that needs to be riveted. The screw will keep the other side of the pin from backing out. Repeat on the other pin....


    Starting to get there...


    This next step takes a little balancing act. Put the nut on. Remember, turn left to tighten. Put the bike in 1st gear. Sit on the seat, and take your ratchet and start tightening. Get it until it's nice and snug. Then, take your torque wrench out, and tighten to 50 ft-lb.....



    Now, follow your manual's suggestion on the correct process for setting the final torque on the nut, and also for setting the lock screw. As you can see, the PBI sprocket has a different locking system than stock. Here you have to put a small lock bolt on the flat of the nut, so it can't turn and back out. Don't forget loctite on both.....


    The take-offs....


    I dig the new chain line and overall cleanliness of the chain vs. belt. Note the timing cover. Now is a good time to set the proper tension on the chain, and fasten your axle nut and clip to specs....


    And, the whole picture.....
    Last edited by Tito; 12-21-2011 at 1:24 AM. Reason: long winded

  2. #2
    billdozer
    Guest

    Default

    Thanks Tito. Nice, useful tech. And, nice ignition cover!

  3. #3
    Senior Member

    Content on this page requires a newer version of Adobe Flash Player.

    Get Adobe Flash player


    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    2,990

    Default

    what pegs are those?

  4. #4
    Junior Member

    Content on this page requires a newer version of Adobe Flash Player.

    Get Adobe Flash player


    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Posts
    4

    Default

    Nice how to man and nice ride. That banana seat is the shit.

  5. #5
    Senior Member

    Content on this page requires a newer version of Adobe Flash Player.

    Get Adobe Flash player


    Join Date
    May 2010
    Posts
    940

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by REV View Post
    what pegs are those?
    You can get them on ebay for about $20, just have to cut the nub off, and put in a few minutes with a file. I swiped them off my old honda before I sold it. Search XR+honda+pegs.


  6. #6
    Senior Member

    Content on this page requires a newer version of Adobe Flash Player.

    Get Adobe Flash player


    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    2,990

    Default

    and they hold up well? im known to stand on my pegs and im a big boy...

  7. #7
    Senior Member

    Content on this page requires a newer version of Adobe Flash Player.

    Get Adobe Flash player


    Join Date
    May 2010
    Posts
    940

    Default

    For $20, I imagine they are made by a 7 year old, one-armed Taiwanese girl, cast from melted dental fillings, rusty needles, and discarded cambell's soup cans....and she can crank out 34 sets an hour.

    I stand on them fine, if I need to get a look over traffic, or need to rise off the seat for an unavoidable pothole. But I don't ride for more than a moment on these pegs, or any pegs for that matter.

  8. #8
    Senior Member

    Content on this page requires a newer version of Adobe Flash Player.

    Get Adobe Flash player


    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    1,316

    Default

    Nice write up! Chain conversion is on my to-do list.

    Hey! My ...uh I mean your new bars look great! Any more pics of them?

  9. #9
    Senior Member

    Content on this page requires a newer version of Adobe Flash Player.

    Get Adobe Flash player


    Join Date
    May 2010
    Posts
    940

    Default

    I will show some better pics as soon as I put on my itty-bitty m/c and clutch. They deserve some smaller accessories to really show them off, and it is next on my list. I'll post them in your Chop Market thread as soon as I get that done, I promise.

  10. #10
    Senior Member

    Content on this page requires a newer version of Adobe Flash Player.

    Get Adobe Flash player


    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    134

    Default

    Thanks for the write up. I have all the parts and plan on doing this soon, so this will help for sure. Bike looks nice!

  11. #11
    Senior Member

    Content on this page requires a newer version of Adobe Flash Player.

    Get Adobe Flash player


    Join Date
    May 2010
    Posts
    2,250

    Default

    Great write up Im curious what air cleaner that is

  12. #12
    Senior Member

    Content on this page requires a newer version of Adobe Flash Player.

    Get Adobe Flash player


    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    259

    Default

    Great write up. I've suscribed for future reference.

  13. #13
    Senior Member

    Content on this page requires a newer version of Adobe Flash Player.

    Get Adobe Flash player


    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Posts
    2,665

    Default

    shit, when i did mine a couple years ago i had to cut that damn nut off. they are a bitch.

  14. #14
    Senior Member

    Content on this page requires a newer version of Adobe Flash Player.

    Get Adobe Flash player


    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    151

    Default

    looks awesome! def on my to do list. you should do a writeup on how you cut your enginecovers..

  15. #15
    Senior Member

    Content on this page requires a newer version of Adobe Flash Player.

    Get Adobe Flash player


    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    259

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by MisterFul View Post
    looks awesome! def on my to do list. you should do a writeup on how you cut your enginecovers..
    Here's a good write up I found that I plan on following to do mine.


    Cam cover chop

  16. #16
    Senior Member

    Content on this page requires a newer version of Adobe Flash Player.

    Get Adobe Flash player


    Join Date
    May 2010
    Posts
    940

    Default

    That is a Spitfire A/C. Well made piece.

  17. #17
    Senior Member

    Content on this page requires a newer version of Adobe Flash Player.

    Get Adobe Flash player


    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    2,140

    Default

    Looks awesome and good writeup! Thanks!

    I did a 520 conversion to a gsxr a while back and couldnt find a steel sprocket. I had to get an aluminum one.
    your rear is steel right?

  18. #18
    Senior Member

    Content on this page requires a newer version of Adobe Flash Player.

    Get Adobe Flash player


    Join Date
    May 2010
    Posts
    940

    Default

    Rear is aluminum. I forget which alloy it is. I did some research when I was setting all this up, and most say that if set up correctly, the new alloy sprockets will last plenty long. I'm not too worried about it.
    Last edited by Tito; 12-19-2011 at 3:32 PM.

  19. #19
    Senior Member

    Content on this page requires a newer version of Adobe Flash Player.

    Get Adobe Flash player


    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    2,140

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Tito View Post
    Rear is aluminum. I forget which alloy it is. I did some research when I was setting all this up, and most say that if set up correctly, the new alloy sprockets will last plenty long. I'm not too worried about it.
    No shit? Yeah I don't really have anything against aluminum sprocket, was just wondering if it was or not. I heard you have to use a larger diameter front and rear to clear some obstruction on a rubber mounted sporty, but being a gsxr rear wheel I should be able to find anything with all the stunt bikes out there.

    Thanks again for the writeup. I vote this to greatest hits. Simple yet very informative.

  20. #20
    Senior Member

    Content on this page requires a newer version of Adobe Flash Player.

    Get Adobe Flash player


    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    164

    Default

    great how to I like chain better the belt

Share This



Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Log in

Log in