CHOP CULT HOME
Email Password
Search
  1. #1
    Senior Member

    Content on this page requires a newer version of Adobe Flash Player.

    Get Adobe Flash player


    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Posts
    197

    Default Smoothing out a tank

    I recently got a new tank from kustomwerks, and my first impression is that it's pretty low quality, but being the only gas tank I've ever bought new, I have no bearing on the situation. The tank is basically just wongy. There's pits and gouges, a few areas that are too high, and a few spots that are faceted from a grinder. I thought maybe some hi build primer would help out, but it can't fix some areas. My brother suggested "bondo for low spots, a hammer for high". Does anyone have tips that may make it easier for me to turn this into a tank that won't look like shit with anything glossier than completely flat paint?

    Thanks

  2. #2
    Senior Member

    Content on this page requires a newer version of Adobe Flash Player.

    Get Adobe Flash player


    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    215

    Default

    Common practice is to skim coat the whole tank. I would never use Bondo. Find your local paint supply shop and tell them you want skim coat.

  3. #3
    Senior Member

    Content on this page requires a newer version of Adobe Flash Player.

    Get Adobe Flash player


    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    210

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by junior1991hd View Post
    Common practice is to skim coat the whole tank. I would never use Bondo. Find your local paint supply shop and tell them you want skim coat.
    Is the skim coat some kind of really thick paint?

  4. #4
    Senior Member

    Content on this page requires a newer version of Adobe Flash Player.

    Get Adobe Flash player


    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Posts
    316

    Default

    It's a "Bondo" type substance but not bondo. I use Evercoat, have had good luck with their products

  5. #5
    Senior Member

    Content on this page requires a newer version of Adobe Flash Player.

    Get Adobe Flash player


    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Posts
    197

    Default

    Here's something I found while looking up skim coat. Seems like a pretty comprehensive write up. http://cbrforum.com/forum/how-mechan...-job**-115135/

  6. #6
    Senior Member

    Content on this page requires a newer version of Adobe Flash Player.

    Get Adobe Flash player


    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    210

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by MetalKing00 View Post
    Here's something I found while looking up skim coat. Seems like a pretty comprehensive write up. http://cbrforum.com/forum/how-mechan...-job**-115135/
    Great link!

  7. #7
    Senior Member

    Content on this page requires a newer version of Adobe Flash Player.

    Get Adobe Flash player


    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Posts
    2,171

    Default

    Skim coat/ glazing putty......after you sand it pretty hit it with the high build primer.
    Fresh tanks just need a lil love I guess.

    It's not quite the nightmare folks make it out to be.

    I guess having a utility sink makes wetsanding less formidable.

  8. #8
    Senior Member

    Content on this page requires a newer version of Adobe Flash Player.

    Get Adobe Flash player


    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Posts
    197

    Default

    I was just kinda expecting a new tank to be smooth and ready. I'll look into the evercoat stuff. That link mentions metal2metal, seems like pretty good stuff. Initially I was thinking this project would be a two or three day, easy one. Now it seems it'll probably last forever, since I'm broke and can only get one thing at a time. Guess that's not the tanks fault though.

    I found another reference to an evercoat product called metalglaze. Seems like that's the skim coat stuff, and metal2metal is more like bondo.
    Last edited by MetalKing00; 03-22-2013 at 7:26 PM.

  9. #9
    Senior Member

    Content on this page requires a newer version of Adobe Flash Player.

    Get Adobe Flash player


    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Posts
    479

    Default

    I am currently working on several brand-new pieces of new sheet metal, both tanks and fenders, for painting clients. All of them have flat spots, low spots, high spot, grind marks, and my personal favorite... stretch marks and gouges from being formed in the dies.

    For high spots, I use a ball-peen hammer to gently turn high spots into slight low spots to be filled/glazed. A lot of guys like to skim coat the entire piece with "icing"... I prefer to use a combination of Evercoat rage body filler and glazing compound to smooth it out. A few nice heavy coats of hi-build or epoxy primer and it should smooth out wet-sanding with either 400-grit or 600-grit sandpaper.

    The best new tanks that I've worked on recently have been Throttle Addiction tanks... needed almost no work to prep for primer.

  10. #10
    Senior Member

    Content on this page requires a newer version of Adobe Flash Player.

    Get Adobe Flash player


    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Posts
    197

    Default

    Cool, thanks for the tips

  11. #11
    Junior Member

    Content on this page requires a newer version of Adobe Flash Player.

    Get Adobe Flash player


    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    4

    Default

    I just recently Molded my frame and tank. It was a pain in the ass to evenly skim coat areas that weren't flat or odd shaped. I found some amazing stuff at the paint supply shop called SlickSand. It's pretty much a super high build primer. It has a hardener that you mix with it and you can lay it on super super heavy. I sprayed about 3 coats and it totally buried 80 grit sanding marks. It hardens really quick. After you mix it you only have about a half hour before it turns into a big jello plug in your spray cup, the second time I sprayed it I got it out of the gun and cleaned faster. It's kind of pricey, was about $34 for a quart but I'll use it every time whenever I do bodywork on weird shaped stuff like tanks, worth every penny.

  12. #12
    Senior Member

    Content on this page requires a newer version of Adobe Flash Player.

    Get Adobe Flash player


    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Posts
    479

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ironheadtodd View Post
    I just recently Molded my frame and tank. It was a pain in the ass to evenly skim coat areas that weren't flat or odd shaped. I found some amazing stuff at the paint supply shop called SlickSand. It's pretty much a super high build primer. It has a hardener that you mix with it and you can lay it on super super heavy. I sprayed about 3 coats and it totally buried 80 grit sanding marks. It hardens really quick. After you mix it you only have about a half hour before it turns into a big jello plug in your spray cup, the second time I sprayed it I got it out of the gun and cleaned faster. It's kind of pricey, was about $34 for a quart but I'll use it every time whenever I do bodywork on weird shaped stuff like tanks, worth every penny.
    Sounds like a very interesting product. How many coats do you typically lay down... probably only a couple due to the very short pot life of it?

    www.flamethrowercustoms.blogspot.com
    www.flamethrowercustoms.com

  13. #13
    Member

    Content on this page requires a newer version of Adobe Flash Player.

    Get Adobe Flash player


    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    86

    Default

    I do body work every day for a living and just recently did my tank and fender. I would hit the whole tank with 80 grit on a DA. That will get rid of some of the imperfections and then use a skim coat. Would definitely only use evercoat products! The other thing you could do is use a sprayable poleyester if you have a spray gun. That will give you a nice even coat. Then sand that down and prime it. If you never used any form of bondo its going to be hard to get a nice even coat on a gas tank.

  14. #14
    diy570
    Guest

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ironheadtodd View Post
    I found some amazing stuff at the paint supply shop called SlickSand. It's pretty much a super high build primer. It has a hardener that you mix with it and you can lay it on super super heavy. I sprayed about 3 coats and it totally buried 80 grit sanding marks. It hardens really quick.
    slicksand is good stuff, like any other evercoat product. i restore old vw's for a living and was never a fan of high build primers, but i started using slicksand a couple years ago and it makes life easy. you'll want at least a 2.0 set up for your gun.

Share This



Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Log in

Log in